• Fuel consumption

    From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Björn Felten on Thursday, May 23, 2019 00:51:56
    Bjrn Felten -> Kurt Weiske skrev 2019-05-22 23:45:
    fuel consumption on 120km/h highway speed going down to around 5 litres/100 km

    As an extra service to all the poor sods, still locked away from the metric system, the above calculates to 47 US MPG.




    ..

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; sv-SE; rv:1.9.1.16) Gecko/20101125
    * Origin: news://eljaco.se (2:203/2)
  • From Henri Derksen@2:280/1208 to Fabio Bizzi on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 23:39:00
    Hello Fabio,

    I had a 2001 V70 wagon, the plain old model - and loved it. I
    still want to get a 2004 XC70 if I can find a well-maintained one
    - that was the last purely Volvo (designed and built by Volvo) if
    memory serves. I think the next year was the year they came out
    with that Ford Taurus world platform.

    The V70 wagon was a great car!!! I loved and still love it! :)
    XC is a SUV and it's also too modern for me, I don't like SUV and modern cars. ;)

    Me neither.
    My current car is a VW Lupo 3L 1.2 TDI from 1999, so almost 20 years old,
    and still going strong after 450.000 km.
    I started in 1978 with a VW 1300 Type 1 build in 1967, it had only 6 Volts
    and a mechanical petrol tank meter. The washer system was powerd by pressed air, the best system I have ever seen, no electricity needed to wash the windscreen, and you could very the height and water amount with your finger. When you filled it again, you pump it up with pressed air from a footpump or the one from the gas station with or without filling the petrol tank,
    and/or the tires with air, very simple I think.
    My later cars were a Citroen GS, Suzuki Alto, Suzuki Samurai
    and now the VW Lupo 3L 1.2 TDI. I liked that 7 year 4x4WD Samurai period.
    I am not sure what will be the next one, but I am still looking around for
    a small car with at least has the radius of about 400 km or greater to
    travel to Mortsel.be and back from Arnhem.nl
    Now I can drive for at least 1100 km's before filling my tank is necessarry with again 40 Liter diesel. My record was 1650 km at one filling when driving at the special tyres (Bridgestone B381 Ecopia) wich I can't get anymore ;-(. That trip was to Wolfsburg.de, of course at only 90 km/h. ;-).

    In my city Arnhem.nl a H2 filling station is build this year 2019.
    So I am looking forward for a car driving at H2, because CNG, LPG, Diesel, Petrol shall all be gone after 2030, because that are fossil fuels.
    There are not enough production goods to produce electric accumulators,
    besides the too small grid capacity to fill all the electric cars there are coming. So I think green H2 produced by sunpanels and/or windturbines shall
    be the answer for our mass mobility in future.

    Automotive greetings from Henri.

    ---
    * Origin: Connectivity is the Future; UniCorn BBS 31 26 4425506 (2:280/1208)
  • From Fabio Bizzi@2:335/364.1 to Henri Derksen on Thursday, May 23, 2019 09:15:56
    Hello Henri!

    22 May 19 23:39, you wrote to me:

    I don't like SUV and modern cars. ;)

    Me neither.

    C'mon brother, let the good times rolls! :)

    My current car is a VW Lupo 3L 1.2 TDI from 1999, so almost 20 years
    old, and still going strong after 450.000 km. I started in 1978 with a
    VW 1300 Type 1 build in 1967, it had only 6 Volts and a mechanical
    [...]

    VW was and in a relative way still are great cars.
    When I was young I was in love with italian cars, expecially Alfa Romeo, in Italy they was "The CAR" for the mid class.

    But the decline phase was in progress, and let me sauy that from the later 70s the quality of the materials and the assemblying started to be poor.

    BMW, Volvo and VW instead started the trend to improve materials assembly quality, a 1982 320i E30 BMW didn't performed like an Alfa Romeo 75 but it was a lot reliable than an Alfa 75 (the proof is that now we have a lot of BMW E30 and a really few of Alfa 75).

    BTW, I loved my father's Fiat 124 Sport Coupe 1400cc (Model BC), great design, incredible engine and a real drive pleasure, but later a felt in love with a VW
    Transporter T2 that I owned in the first '90s, I owned also a Fiat 126 (my first car), a Fiat panda 30 (126's two cylinders engine, a mixer :D ) and a Fiat uno and other common cars that don't worth to speak about.

    Now I drive the last car owned by my father a BMW 320i E46 six cylinders and I'm restoring a 1983 BMW 320i E30 in my garage, for everyday I use my wife's car a Dacia Sandero Stepway 0.9TCe LPG. Let me say, an incredible engine, and a
    surprising car, but obviusly it isn't in my hart.

    And please, avoid Mortsel, strange people live there. :P :P :P

    In my city Arnhem.nl a H2 filling station is build this year 2019.
    So I am looking forward for a car driving at H2, because CNG, LPG,
    Diesel, Petrol shall all be gone after 2030, because that are fossil fuels. There are not enough production goods to produce electric accumulators, besides the too small grid capacity to fill all the
    electric cars there are coming. So I think green H2 produced by
    sunpanels and/or windturbines shall be the answer for our mass
    mobility in future.

    I totally agree with you, but in Italy we have the greatest petrol refineries, so here is hard to have a real electric transition.

    Now we have a good hibrid cars presence but the transition to a real electric mobility with H2 stations is far away. :(

    Automotive greetings from Henri.

    Vintage cars greethings from Fabio! :)

    Ciao!
    Fabio

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: ]\/[imac Rebirth Boss Point (2:335/364.1)
  • From Henri Derksen@2:280/1208 to Fabio Bizzi on Thursday, May 23, 2019 14:26:00
    Hello Fabio,

    When I was young I was in love with italian cars, expecially Alfa Romeo,
    in Italy they was "The CAR" for the mid class.

    My brother started in 1980 wit an Alfa Sud,
    you know that 4 cyl. 4 stroke boxer engine with frontwheeldrive?
    Marvelous engine.

    But the decline phase was in progress, and let me sauy that from the
    later 70s the quality of the materials and the assemblying started to be poor.

    Rust was the main problem.
    I have heard the personal at the carworks were angry,
    and made the products of lesser quallity than possible to force the
    management to pay more salaries. You know that story?

    French cars had the same rust problem (Citroen 2CV and Renault 4)
    but there they had to use a large amount of used metal in new cars,
    and that metal was not clean enough, so rust started already in the show room.

    BMW, Volvo and VW instead started the trend to improve materials
    assembly quality, a 1982 320i E30 BMW didn't performed like an Alfa
    Romeo 75 but it was a lot reliable than an Alfa 75 (the proof is that
    now we have a lot of BMW E30 and a really few of Alfa 75).

    The Alfa Romeo Gulia 1600 with a profiled suitcase hood was famous.
    At that time too expensive for us starting working after completing study.
    The later model had a flat suitcase hood, wich was loved less.

    BTW, I loved my father's Fiat 124 Sport Coupe 1400cc (Model BC), great design, incredible engine and a real drive pleasure,

    My father bought in 1976 when I was the first person with a driving license
    a 1973 model Fiat 128. The engine was marvelous, but also there the rust
    was the big problem in the sixties and seventies.

    but later a felt in love with a VW Transporter T2 that I owned in the
    first '90s,

    I know the T2 very well in my youth for transportation from house to school and
    back every day in 1968, 1969 and 1970. It has a loud 4 cyl 4 stroke
    aircooled boxer petrol engine of 1600 cc's that took a lot of petrol.

    In 1977 I was hired in as a T2 driver for one week with students for work in a brewery, because I did not drink alcohol as the others did very much.
    I have learned much in that one single week.

    I owned also a Fiat 126 (my first car),

    That's the car with the engine at the back.
    One colleage at work had such a small car.
    Did not they call it the Bambino ?

    a Fiat panda 30 (126's two cylinders engine, a mixer :D )

    I know the Panda, but not exactly all the models.

    After we sold the Fiat 128, we were not interested in Fiat anymore.

    and a Fiat uno and other common cars that don't worth to speak about.

    Indeed.

    My brother and I had a hobby that years to read the characteristics of a car from a book and the other has to mention what make and model it was,
    lovely to do. If it was wrong you may do another one, if you were wrong,
    the other had a chance to mention a difficult or less used model.
    That was the period you could easyally oversee the total range of models of every make. Nowadays that's more difficult.

    Now I drive the last car owned by my father a BMW 320i E46 six cylinders and I'm restoring a 1983 BMW 320i E30 in my garage, for everyday I use
    my wife's car a Dacia Sandero Stepway 0.9TCe LPG. Let me say, an
    incredible engine, and a surprising car, but obviusly it isn't in my
    hart.

    I understand, it has not the quality of the German cars.
    We call that: "Deutsche Grundlichkeit."

    And please, avoid Mortsel, strange people live there. :P :P :P

    I know, I have never seen his street, only his face when he once visited our RISC OS and Linux computerclub in Mortsel to give him a 2:1 transformer
    for use with a USA modem he had then. Pity I never heard the results.

    So I think green H2 produced by sunpanels and/or windturbines
    shall be the answer for our mass mobility in future.

    I totally agree with you, but in Italy we have the greatest petrol refineries, so here is hard to have a real electric transition.

    Yes, and I think it is a long way before the whole transition from fossil energy to electric or H2 wil be fullfilled.

    Now we have a good hibrid cars presence but the transition to a real electric mobility with H2 stations is far away. :(

    Yes, but in the near future that transition has to start.
    In The Netherlands there are sold 50 % more electric cars in 2018 than in 2017. So it is a start.

    Automotive greetings from Henri.

    ---
    * Origin: Computing Apart Together (2:280/1208)
  • From Fabio Bizzi@2:335/364.1 to Henri Derksen on Friday, May 24, 2019 09:21:02
    Hello Henri!

    23 May 19 14:26, you wrote to me:

    My brother started in 1980 wit an Alfa Sud,
    you know that 4 cyl. 4 stroke boxer engine with frontwheeldrive?
    Marvelous engine.

    That was a winning project, the engine was powerful and reliable, the road holding and handling where never seen before in a front-wheel drive, but them had a killer problem, in short time them vanished for the rust. :(

    I have heard the personal at the carworks were angry,
    and made the products of lesser quallity than possible to force the management to pay more salaries. You know that story?

    It was a major Italian issue in the '70s, the class fight between workers and masters was strong and this was a way to fight (the wrong way imho).

    My father bought in 1976 when I was the first person with a driving license a 1973 model Fiat 128. The engine was marvelous, but also
    there the rust was the big problem in the sixties and seventies.

    The Fiat 128 was a really popular model in Italy, overall a good car.
    The rust was a common problem in all Italian Cars in the range of '70-'90 years.

    I owned also a Fiat 126 (my first car),

    That's the car with the engine at the back.

    It was the model that come in place of the fiat 500, it had the same engine type and displacement, two cylinders air cooled, back displacement and the mechanical starter (a small lever placed on the floor of the car that pulled a cable that phisically link the starter electical engine to the flywheel like the fiat 500), look at this: https://youtu.be/_Y6z4UyhPKA
    The second lever is the "choke".

    A really fun car! :)

    Did not they call it the Bambino ?

    Never heard in Italy.

    After we sold the Fiat 128, we were not interested in Fiat anymore.

    You did the right choice. ;)

    Ciao!
    Fabio

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: ]\/[imac Rebirth Boss Point (2:335/364.1)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Fabio Bizzi on Friday, May 24, 2019 10:05:40
    Hello Fabio,

    On Friday May 24 2019 09:21, you wrote to Henri Derksen:

    It was the model that come in place of the fiat 500, it had the same engine type and displacement, two cylinders air cooled, back
    displacement and the mechanical starter (a small lever placed on the
    floor of the car that pulled a cable that phisically link the starter electical engine to the flywheel like the fiat 500), look at this: https://youtu.be/_Y6z4UyhPKA The second lever is the "choke".

    My first car was a Fiat 500. Yes, I remember the two levers between the front seats beside the hand brake..

    BTW, my mother's Renault 4 (La Reine) in which I learned yo drive also had a similar starter lever next to the hand brake. Same as the Renault Dauphine in whch I did tghe driver's test.

    A really fun car! :)

    Yep the Fiat 500 was a fun car. It carried me to many of the EU countries. France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Spain, Andorra, Monaco, Italy, Germany, Austria, Switserland, The UK, Ireland, Czecho Slovakia and Poland. I once dismounted the
    engine, carried it inside my house boat to replace a valve. Then carried it back out and remounted it.

    Unfortunately the Fiat 500 had a serious rust problem and it so it ended on the
    scrao yard...


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: http://www.vlist.org (2:280/5555)