• The AR-15 rifle

    From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Dan Clough on Thursday, May 23, 2019 00:28:04
    An AR-15 is *NOT* a military weapon, and never has been.

    You obviously don't know your weapons history. Even I, a Swede, know that the AR-15 was used in Vietnam by the thousands.

    (from Wikipedia)

    In January 1963, Secretary McNamara received reports that M14 production was insufficient to meet the needs of the armed forces and ordered a halt to M14 production. At the time, the AR-15 was the only rifle that could fulfill a requirement of a "universal" infantry weapon for issue to all services. McNamara ordered its adoption.



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  • From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to BOB ACKLEY on Thursday, May 23, 2019 00:44:38
    Ah, but they were. I carried one (but didn't fire it) when I was at Da Nang in 1965

    I wonder if Dan can man up and give you an apology. He's probably too young to understand that every person who has ever served in the military knows his weapon by the time inside out. Including the name.

    I for instance know everything there is to know about my service weapon, Carl Gustav m/45. And nobody can claim that it was not my dedicated weapon by then.

    Oh, BTW, speaking of Vietnam, during the Vietnam War, the US Navy SEALs used
    the Swedish Carl Gustav m/45 extensively. One of the gun's qualities which appealed to the US Navy was that the m/45 can fire almost immediately out of the water (over the beach). 8-)

    I wonder what weapon Dan used in his military days. If any...




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  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/1384.125 to Björn Felten on Thursday, May 23, 2019 09:31:33
    Hi! Björn,

    On 05/23/2019 08:44 AM, you wrote:

    I for instance know everything there is to know about my service weapon, Carl Gustav m/45.

    Same, same here. On our L1A1 SLRs, I can still carry out safety procedures/instant actions (on misfiring), disassembly, cleaning and re-assembly in my sleep, from over 40 years ago. OTOH, I can't remember much about the Steyr AUG since I fired it during one range shoot only in my last year prior to retiring (as a civil servant) in '93.

    I wonder what weapon Dan used in his military days. If any...

    Must've been a M-14. It ain't anything like an AR-16/Colt.

    Cheers,
    Paul.

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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Björn Felten on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 18:55:00
    Bjrn Felten wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    An AR-15 is *NOT* a military weapon, and never has been.

    You obviously don't know your weapons history. Even I, a
    Swede, know that the AR-15 was used in Vietnam by the thousands.

    You're wrong. Those rifles were AR-15 *style* rifles. Not
    AR-15's. When the military adopted that *style* of rifle, it was
    designated the M-16.

    (from Wikipedia)

    In January 1963, Secretary McNamara received reports that M14
    production was insufficient to meet the needs of the armed forces
    and ordered a halt to M14 production. At the time, the AR-15 was
    the only rifle that could fulfill a requirement of a "universal"
    infantry weapon for issue to all services. McNamara ordered its
    adoption.

    That's misleading. Try reading more here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AR-15_style_rifle#Comparison_to_military_versions

    I don't know how I can make it any more simple, so that you can
    understand it. An AR-15 rifle is a *civilian* firearm and is not
    used by *ANY* military.



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  • From Lee Lofaso@2:203/2 to All on Thursday, May 23, 2019 19:35:29
    An AR-15 is *NOT* a military weapon, and never has been.

    You obviously don't know your weapons history. Even I, a
    Swede, know that the AR-15 was used in Vietnam by the thousands.

    You're wrong. Those rifles were AR-15 *style* rifles. Not
    AR-15's. When the military adopted that *style* of rifle, it was designated the M-16.

    The NRA is incorrect. The AR-15 was designed, and used, as
    a military weapon. Bjrn cited Wikipedia for a very incomplete
    and shortened history of the AR-15. The AR-15 used in the
    military was *not* an AR-15 style rifle, as the NRA would like
    folks to believe.

    Here is the complete history of the AK-15, which soundly refutes
    the made-up story concocted by the NRA about the weapon.

    https://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/the-complete-history-of-
    the-ar-15-rifle

    (from Wikipedia)

    In January 1963, Secretary McNamara received reports that M14
    production was insufficient to meet the needs of the armed forces
    and ordered a halt to M14 production. At the time, the AR-15 was
    the only rifle that could fulfill a requirement of a "universal"
    infantry weapon for issue to all services. McNamara ordered its
    adoption.

    That's misleading. Try reading more here:

    That is *not* misleading, although it is incomplete due to shortened
    length.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AR-15_style_rifle#Comparison_to_military_versions

    I don't know how I can make it any more simple, so that you can
    understand it. An AR-15 rifle is a *civilian* firearm and is not
    used by *ANY* military.

    There are many AR-15 style rifles. None of them being the AR-15
    that was designed, tested, and used by the US military.

    The NRA does not want anybody to know that. Now they're busted.

    --Lee

    --
    Your Hole Is Our Goal

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  • From Lee Lofaso@2:203/2 to Björn Felten on Thursday, May 23, 2019 19:35:35
    Hello Bjrn,

    An AR-15 is *NOT* a military weapon, and never has been.

    You obviously don't know your weapons history. Even I, a Swede, know that the AR-15 was used in Vietnam by the thousands.

    Some gun nuts only listen to the NRA, which tells them only
    what they want to know. Not that any of what the NRA says or
    publishes is accurate, or even makes sense. Be that as it
    may, here is the complete history of the AR-15 that is beyond
    dispute -

    https://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/the-complete-history-of-
    the-ar-15-rifle

    (from Wikipedia)

    In January 1963, Secretary McNamara received reports that M14 production
    was
    insufficient to meet the needs of the armed forces and ordered a halt to M14 production. At the time, the AR-15 was the only rifle that could fulfill a requirement of a "universal" infantry weapon for issue to all services. McNamara ordered its adoption.

    Now you done it! You questioned the NRA! Now prepare for a
    rebuttal. By Wikepidea (written by the NRA).

    --Lee

    --
    Sleep With Someone New

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  • From Lee Lofaso@2:203/2 to All on Thursday, May 23, 2019 21:35:15
    By the way, AR-15's are not used in war. By anybody.

    Ah, but they were. I carried one (but didn't fire it) when I was
    at Da Nang in 1965

    No, you didn't. Your memory is getting fuzzy.

    You carried either an M-14 or an M-16.

    An AR-15 is *NOT* a military weapon, and never has been. It also
    is *NOT* the same thing as an M14/M16. I would hope that you know
    the differences, and I'm wondering why you apparently do not.

    Yes, he did. And many others did, too.

    Complete history of the AR-15 rifle -

    https://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/the-complete-history-of-
    the-ar-15-rifle

    --Lee

    --
    Big Or Small We Lay Them All

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  • From BOB ACKLEY@1:123/140 to BJƒRN FELTEN on Saturday, May 25, 2019 11:18:28
    Ah, but they were. I carried one (but didn't fire it) when I was
    at Da
    Nang in 1965

    I wonder if Dan can man up and give you an apology. He's probably
    too young
    to understand that every person who has ever served in the military
    knows his
    weapon by the time inside out. Including the name.

    I for instance know everything there is to know about my service weapon, Carl Gustav m/45. And nobody can claim that it was not my dedicated
    weapon by
    then.

    Oh, BTW, speaking of Vietnam, during the Vietnam War, the US Navy
    SEALs used
    the Swedish Carl Gustav m/45 extensively. One of the gun's qualities which appealed to the US Navy was that the m/45 can fire almost immediately
    out of
    the water (over the beach). 8-)

    I wonder what weapon Dan used in his military days. If any...

    At Da Nang I was stationed at Monkey Mountain, which is on the end of the peninsula that forms the bay at Da Nang. There was a padlocked wooden
    cabinet in the barracks that contained a bunch of AR-15s and magazines
    for them, the key to the padlock was in a paper envelope taped to the
    door. Anyhow, standard procedure was that one person in the truck would
    be armed when the truck took the new shift up the hill, and that person
    pulled the weapon out of the cabinet, carried it up the hill and the
    person on the relieved shift would bring it back down and put it back int
    he cabinet. Shortly before I left there was an alert for some (idiot)
    reason and they decreed that *everybody* in the truck would carry a
    weapon. OK, fine, we got to the top of the hill and I could NOT clear my weapon, the slide simply would NOT come back - four of us tried to do it
    an none of us could. It took our guard two hours, with tools, to break
    down that weapon and clean it. The next day there was a whole crew going through that cabinet cleaning and checking the weapons
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