• The last mountain top above sea level

    From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Michiel van der Vlist on Wednesday, August 14, 2019 17:16:11
    MvdV> Not so. It will not be the highest mountain above earth's center, but
    MvdV> the highest mountain above main sea level that will be submerged last.
    MvdV> And that is Mt Everest.

    Now you are wrong. Mt. Everest is the highest point above the *present* sea level. It will no longer be if you raise it by 8840m.

    Because of the centrifugal force that causes the Earth to be "flattened" as you call it -- more accurately become an ellipsoid -- the sea level will be raised equally much more, the closer to the equator you get.

    How can you not understand such elementary physics...?



    ..

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  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Björn Felten on Thursday, August 15, 2019 00:00:49
    Hello Bjrn,

    On Wednesday August 14 2019 17:16, you wrote to me:

    Now you are wrong. Mt. Everest is the highest point above the
    *present* sea level. It will no longer be if you raise it by 8840m.

    Because of the centrifugal force that causes the Earth to be "flattened" as you call it -- more accurately become an ellipsoid --
    the sea level will be raised equally much more, the closer to the
    equator you get.

    How can you not understand such elementary physics...?

    GIGO also applies to physics. The GI in this case is "raise the sea level by 8840m".

    If the planet turns into Sea World, "raising sea level by 8840m" is not how it will happen. Where would all that water come from? If all the ice in the world melts, we are talking 100 or 200 meters at most. So raising the sea level by 8840m is not going to happen.

    Present another model where (almost) all of the earth is covered by water and we can talk again.


    Cheers, Michiel

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  • From Dale Shipp@1:261/1466 to Michiel Van Der Vlist on Thursday, August 15, 2019 01:56:08
    On 08-15-19 00:00, Michiel Van Der Vlist <=-
    spoke to Bjrn Felten about The last mountain top abo <=-

    MVDV> water come from? If all the ice in the world melts, we are
    MVDV> talking 100 or 200 meters at most. So raising the sea level
    MVDV> by 8840m is not going to happen.

    I was wondering who would be the first to point that out.
    Congratulations. OTOH, a raising of ocean levels by much less than 100
    meters would be very serious. Much of popluation lives near sea coast.
    A ten meter rise would have a very big impact on them. A 100 meter rise
    in sea level would entirely wipe the state where I grew up, Florida

    I don't know exactly what would happen where I live, but am pretty sure
    that a 100 meter rise would put most of Maryland from me to the
    Appalachian mountain range under water.

    How would the Netherlands fare? I expect from what little I know that
    the Holland states would vanish.

    Dale Shipp
    fido_261_1466 (at) verizon (dot) net
    (1:261/1466)



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  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Dale Shipp on Thursday, August 15, 2019 14:31:48
    Hello Dale,

    On Thursday August 15 2019 01:56, you wrote to me:

    Congratulations. OTOH, a raising of ocean levels by much less than
    100 meters would be very serious. Much of popluation lives near sea coast. A ten meter rise would have a very big impact on them. A 100
    meter rise in sea level would entirely wipe the state where I grew up, Florida

    Worse case estimate: If all the ice on Antartica and Greenland melts, the average sea level rises by 67 meters.

    Mind you: "average". It would not rise by the same amount everywhere on earth. Near Geenland and Antarctica, it may even fall a bit. That is because of gravitational attraction on the ocean water by the ice masses, sea level is presently higher thers that it would be without the ice. When the ice goes, that extra water flows away fom the region.

    How would the Netherlands fare? I expect from what little I know that
    the Holland states would vanish.

    The Neterhelands is a bit better off than the 67 meters average. It is in the region near enough to Greenland for the gravitational effect to be in favour. Still, a 50 meter sea rise would be disastrous. All of The Netherlands would be
    flooded, except for a small part in the South East. Same for Belgium, Denmark the Northern part of Germany and the Baltic States.


    Cheers, Michiel

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  • From Lee Lofaso@2:203/2 to Michiel van der Vlist on Thursday, August 15, 2019 16:48:37
    Hello Michiel,

    Now you are wrong. Mt. Everest is the highest point above the
    *present* sea level. It will no longer be if you raise it by 8840m.

    Because of the centrifugal force that causes the Earth to be
    "flattened" as you call it -- more accurately become an ellipsoid --
    the sea level will be raised equally much more, the closer to the
    equator you get.

    How can you not understand such elementary physics...?

    MvdV> GIGO also applies to physics. The GI in this case is "raise the sea level
    MvdV> by 8840m".

    MvdV> If the planet turns into Sea World, "raising sea level by 8840m" is not how
    MvdV> it will happen. Where would all that water come from? If all the ice in the
    MvdV> world melts, we are talking 100 or 200 meters at most. So raising the sea
    MvdV> level by 8840m is not going to happen.

    MvdV> Present another model where (almost) all of the earth is covered by water
    MvdV> and we can talk again.

    I can make that happen.
    But it will not be science as you know it.

    --Lee

    --
    Our Nuts, Your Mouth

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  • From Lee Lofaso@2:203/2 to Dale Shipp on Thursday, August 15, 2019 22:19:29
    Hello Dale,

    MVDV>> water come from? If all the ice in the world melts, we are
    MVDV>> talking 100 or 200 meters at most. So raising the sea level
    MVDV>> by 8840m is not going to happen.

    I was wondering who would be the first to point that out.
    Congratulations. OTOH, a raising of ocean levels by much less than 100 meters would be very serious. Much of popluation lives near sea coast.
    A ten meter rise would have a very big impact on them. A 100 meter rise in sea level would entirely wipe the state where I grew up, Florida

    I don't know exactly what would happen where I live, but am pretty sure that a 100 meter rise would put most of Maryland from me to the Appalachian mountain range under water.

    How would the Netherlands fare? I expect from what little I know that
    the Holland states would vanish.

    New Orleans survived Katrina. But not the breeches in the levee
    the next morning. Will New Orleans survive the rising waters of the
    ocean? The city is already 9 feet below city level, with levees
    surrounding the area.

    It is not just New Orleans that would disappear, but also much of
    the land surrounding the city. Most of South Louisiana would no
    longer be land, but open water. I do not expect the city of New
    Orleans to survive beyond the year 2050. So better to have your
    fun now, while you still can.

    --Lee

    --
    As Good As It Looks

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  • From David Drummond@3:640/305 to Lee Lofaso on Friday, August 16, 2019 08:44:25
    On 16/08/2019 06:19, Lee Lofaso -> Dale Shipp wrote:

    How would the Netherlands fare? I expect from what little I know that
    the Holland states would vanish.

    New Orleans survived Katrina.

    Has all been restored and all of the residents return?

    But not the breeches in the levee
    the next morning. Will New Orleans survive the rising waters of the ocean? The city is already 9 feet below city level, with levees surrounding the area.

    --

    Regards
    David

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  • From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Michiel van der Vlist on Friday, August 16, 2019 05:08:44
    How can you not understand such elementary physics...?

    MvdV> GIGO also applies to physics. The GI in this case is "raise the sea
    MvdV> level by 8840m".

    Nice retraction...




    ..

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  • From Lee Lofaso@2:203/2 to David Drummond on Friday, August 16, 2019 13:45:56
    Hello David,

    How would the Netherlands fare? I expect from what little I know that
    the Holland states would vanish.

    New Orleans survived Katrina.

    Has all been restored and all of the residents return?

    The pre-Katrina population was larger than what it is now.
    Many of the former residents were unable to return, and have
    permanently relocated to other places, mostly in Texas. The
    lower ninth ward consisted mainly of renters, and most of
    them had no option other than to live elsewhere. Many areas
    were taken over by developers and new housing built for those
    who could afford the pricy new digs. Old communities that
    once existed are gone and will never return.

    Remember, 80% of the city was flooded. The French Quarter
    and other historic places, along with the CBD, remained mainly
    intact with little damage. And it did take quite a while, and
    lots of government dough, to rebuild what could be rebuilt.

    The Louisiana Superdome had to undergo major renovation. The
    state would have been unable to do the job without federal
    help. But repairs were made, and the sports arena was saved.
    The same can be said of other places.

    Of course, all will be gone within the next 30 years. Even
    if no other massive storm hits The City That Care Forgot.

    But not the breeches in the levee
    the next morning. Will New Orleans survive the rising waters of the
    ocean? The city is already 9 feet below city level, with levees
    surrounding the area.

    I'm going to miss Louisiana when it is gone ...

    --Lee

    --
    Laying Pipe Since '88

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  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Björn Felten on Friday, August 16, 2019 20:38:10
    Hello Bjrn,

    On Friday August 16 2019 05:08, you wrote to me:

    How can you not understand such elementary physics...?

    MvdV>> GIGO also applies to physics. The GI in this case is "raise the
    MvdV>> sea level by 8840m".

    Nice retraction...

    It is not a retraction. I still say that if a Deus ex Magina gathers enough water to raise the sea level high enoug to cover all mountains, the mountain presently highest above sea level will go last.

    But at my age, I find engaging in peeing contests no longer attractive.


    Cheers, Michiel

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