• Re: Imperial vs. metric

    From Ward Dossche@2:292/854 to Dan Clough on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 07:40:00
    Yes, we (the USA) have done just fine without the metric system,
    and don't need (or want) it, thank you.

    You do know that Boeing has already converted all the settings of its planes to
    metric?

    You are aware that the National Park Service, inside the Parks, will convert, has converted or is converting to metric?

    \%/@rd

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  • From Ward Dossche@2:292/854 to Tony Langdon on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 07:41:17
    Nope. There is only one "cup" in this context. Eight ounces (by
    volume, not weight). Quite simple, really.

    Actually, there are several "cups":

    I'm only interested in the cup of the bra of my wife.

    \%/@rd

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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Tony Langdon on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 08:14:00
    Tony Langdon wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Yes, we (the USA) have done just fine without the metric system,
    and don't need (or want) it, thank you.

    And why not? I can't think of one good reason to hang on to
    imperial measurements, though for various reasons, some fields
    here still use imperial, at least unofficially, because in some
    areas, original measurements were based on imperial.

    Honestly, I don't know. It's almost funny though, in light of the
    recent feather rufflings regarding changes to FidoNet... maybe
    because "that's how we do it". People (including myself) are
    often resistant to change just because of that.

    I actually use metric measurements a lot in my work, and see the
    benefits of it. But on the other hand I like to buy my gasoline
    and milk by the gallon, and read my speedometer in MPH. So do
    nearly all other people in the USA, I guess.

    I like to think that we are "bilingual" when it comes to
    measuring. :)



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  • From Kurt Weiske@1:218/700 to Tony Langdon on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 10:06:00
    Tony Langdon wrote to Bjrn Felten <=-

    1 cup = 250ml
    1 tablespoon = 20ml
    1 teaspoon = 5ml

    I'll save these and put them on my refrigerator, for when I measure
    something more exactly than a pinch, a dash or a glug. :)




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  • From Kurt Weiske@1:218/700 to Dan Clough on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 10:10:00
    Dan Clough wrote to Tony Langdon <=-


    Honestly, I don't know. It's almost funny though, in light of the
    recent feather rufflings regarding changes to FidoNet... maybe
    because "that's how we do it". People (including myself) are
    often resistant to change just because of that.

    Let's debate switching the nodelist to metric in the FIDONEWS echo. I
    bet someone will argue each side, for and against it. Bonus points for
    bringing up some vague reference to Z1 actions last century.



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  • From Kurt Weiske@1:218/700 to Dan Clough on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 10:13:00
    Dan Clough wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    I like to think that we are "bilingual" when it comes to
    measuring. :)

    I did some contract work on a military base and got to spend a lot of
    time speaking with our escorts (we were upgrading wireless networking
    across a base and needed escorts when entering barracks)

    It was enlightening speaking to people from all over the country that
    I'd never get a chance to speak to normally.

    One sargeant was talking about the challenges of maneuvers where they
    measured distances in clicks (km) but still measured distance to
    target in yards, and having to convert between the two in their heads.

    I'd think that a meter is close enough to a yard for most things, but
    when hurling lead down-range, expect that they need a little more
    accuracy.



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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Dan Clough on Thursday, March 28, 2019 07:42:00
    On 03-27-19 08:14, Dan Clough wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    Honestly, I don't know. It's almost funny though, in light of the
    recent feather rufflings regarding changes to FidoNet... maybe
    because "that's how we do it". People (including myself) are
    often resistant to change just because of that.

    That's what it seems to be. Well, we survived the change, as I said, I'm old enough to remember the later stages

    I actually use metric measurements a lot in my work, and see the
    benefits of it. But on the other hand I like to buy my gasoline
    and milk by the gallon, and read my speedometer in MPH. So do
    nearly all other people in the USA, I guess.

    You'll get used to it. As I said, from what I see, much of American industry has already changed to metric behind the scenes. I see metric in more and more stuff from the US. However, one thing I will point out is that your gallons aren't what we had bere in the pre-metric days. A US gallon would leave us somewhat short changed. So another reason to go metric - no confusion with different measurements having the same name. :)

    I like to think that we are "bilingual" when it comes to
    measuring. :)

    And I truly am, because I haven't forgotten the old, and still have to use it in certain specialised areas, where metric would simply be unwieldy.

    ... All the easy problems have been solved.

    Apparently, converting the US public to metric isn't one of them. ;)


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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Kurt Weiske on Thursday, March 28, 2019 07:44:00
    On 03-27-19 10:06, Kurt Weiske wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    Tony Langdon wrote to Bjrn Felten <=-

    1 cup = 250ml
    1 tablespoon = 20ml
    1 teaspoon = 5ml

    I'll save these and put them on my refrigerator, for when I measure something more exactly than a pinch, a dash or a glug. :)

    Be careful, find your local variants. These are Australian measures. However, the so-called "metric" measures are similar, except that the metric tablespoon is only 15ml, not 20. :D The other 2 metric measures are the same as the Australian ones.

    We must have bigger tablespoons here. :D


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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Kurt Weiske on Thursday, March 28, 2019 07:57:00
    On 03-27-19 10:13, Kurt Weiske wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    One sargeant was talking about the challenges of maneuvers where they measured distances in clicks (km) but still measured distance to
    target in yards, and having to convert between the two in their heads.

    Yeah, sounds like something I'd do. :)

    I'd think that a meter is close enough to a yard for most things, but
    when hurling lead down-range, expect that they need a little more accuracy.

    It depends, you're off by almost 10% if you don't do the conversion, which will have a huge impact when hurling shells a few km. I certainly wouldn't want to be among the frontline soldiers if my artillery gunners didn't conver the metres to yards properly (if the shells fall 10% short, guess where they're gonna land! ;) ). Also in sport, it's gonna mess up times if one doesn't do the conversion, though 91.44 metres doesn't sound as neat as 100 yards. :)


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  • From Kurt Weiske@1:218/700 to Tony Langdon on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 15:44:39
    Re: Re: Imperial vs. metric
    By: Tony Langdon to Kurt Weiske on Thu Mar 28 2019 07:44 am

    Be careful, find your local variants. These are Australian measures. However, the so-called "metric" measures are similar, except that the metric tablespoon is only 15ml, not 20.

    The only metric "recipe" I have is Bisto instant gravy granules, which calls for 250 ml of boiling water and 4 tablespoons (no metric equivalent given) of gravy granules.

    Where I do have problems is with Jamie Oliver's recipes. I like his style, but the cuts of meat he uses don't always have equivalents here - or if they do they're called something else or not common here. Makes for a challenge.
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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Kurt Weiske on Thursday, March 28, 2019 10:50:00
    On 03-27-19 15:44, Kurt Weiske wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    The only metric "recipe" I have is Bisto instant gravy granules, which calls for 250 ml of boiling water and 4 tablespoons (no metric
    equivalent given) of gravy granules.

    Hmm, where did the recipe come from? Any idea of the source country? Though normally, recipes have some degree of tolerance, and it's the individual character than makes each meal a delight.

    Where I do have problems is with Jamie Oliver's recipes. I like his
    style, but the cuts of meat he uses don't always have equivalents here
    - or if they do they're called something else or not common here. Makes for a challenge.

    I don't know his recipes, I'm not a big fan of cooking shows. :)


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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Kurt Weiske on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 20:06:00
    Kurt Weiske wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Honestly, I don't know. It's almost funny though, in light of the
    recent feather rufflings regarding changes to FidoNet... maybe
    because "that's how we do it". People (including myself) are
    often resistant to change just because of that.

    Let's debate switching the nodelist to metric in the FIDONEWS
    echo. I bet someone will argue each side, for and against it.
    Bonus points for bringing up some vague reference to Z1 actions
    last century.

    ROTFLMAO! Hehe, yeah I have no doubt that could be argued for
    damn near eternity. LOL that's funny right there. :)

    In the end it would surely come down to being the fault of Z1.



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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Kurt Weiske on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 20:09:00
    Kurt Weiske wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    I like to think that we are "bilingual" when it comes to
    measuring. :)

    I did some contract work on a military base and got to spend a
    lot of time speaking with our escorts (we were upgrading wireless networking across a base and needed escorts when entering
    barracks)

    It was enlightening speaking to people from all over the country
    that I'd never get a chance to speak to normally.

    One sargeant was talking about the challenges of maneuvers where
    they measured distances in clicks (km) but still measured
    distance to target in yards, and having to convert between the
    two in their heads.

    I'd think that a meter is close enough to a yard for most things,
    but when hurling lead down-range, expect that they need a little
    more accuracy.

    Yes, I would imagine so. Except for VERY large sized lead, which
    might have a bigger plus/minus allowance. :)




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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Tony Langdon on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 20:17:00
    Tony Langdon wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    I like to think that we are "bilingual" when it comes to
    measuring. :)

    And I truly am, because I haven't forgotten the old, and still
    have to use it in certain specialised areas, where metric would
    simply be unwieldy.

    Yes, me too. Much of my work is very specialized and uses a lot
    of metric measurements. I'm pretty used to both "scales".

    ... All the easy problems have been solved.

    Apparently, converting the US public to metric isn't one of them.
    ;)

    Hehe, you got that right!




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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Dan Clough on Thursday, March 28, 2019 15:01:00
    On 03-27-19 20:17, Dan Clough wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    Yes, me too. Much of my work is very specialized and uses a lot
    of metric measurements. I'm pretty used to both "scales".

    While all my "general" measurements are done in metric, and imperial is used for specific things derived from the past. While many of the measurements have been converted to metric, we still use imperial, because the numbers work out.

    And some more well known sports have some weird hybrids. Take track and field, for instance. Distances are metric - 100m, 200m, 400m, etc. But the lane eidth is 1.22m, which just happens to be 4 feet. Hurdle heights are seemingly weird numbers from 106.7cm doen to 68cm, but in imperial, they range from 3'6" down to 2"3" in 3 inch increments.

    Then it gets weirder. The full weight shot put is 16lb (approx 7.26kg), but under and overage weights are purely metric - 3, 4, 5, 6kg.

    And pole vault, well that's purely imperial. Pole lengths are in feet and loading weights are in pounds.

    Go figure. :D

    ... All the easy problems have been solved.

    Apparently, converting the US public to metric isn't one of them.
    ;)

    Hehe, you got that right!

    Hehehe. :D


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  • From Holger Granholm@2:20/228 to Ward Dossche on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 09:44:00
    In a message on 03-26-19 Ward Dossche said to Bjrn Felten:

    Hi Ward,

    I prefer the D-cup ... that's a decent handful.

    I'd rather choose a B or C cup --- You see my hands aren't so big ;o)


    Have a nice day,

    Holger


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  • From Ward Dossche@2:292/854 to Holger Granholm on Thursday, March 28, 2019 07:49:56
    Holger,

    I prefer the D-cup ... that's a decent handful.

    I'd rather choose a B or C cup --- You see my hands aren't so big ;o)

    Use both of them ... at the same time.

    \%/@rd

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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Tony Langdon on Thursday, March 28, 2019 08:58:00
    Tony Langdon wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Yes, me too. Much of my work is very specialized and uses a lot
    of metric measurements. I'm pretty used to both "scales".

    While all my "general" measurements are done in metric, and
    imperial is used for specific things derived from the past.
    While many of the measurements have been converted to metric, we
    still use imperial, because the numbers work out.

    And some more well known sports have some weird hybrids. Take
    track and field, for instance. Distances are metric - 100m,
    200m, 400m, etc. But the lane eidth is 1.22m, which just happens
    to be 4 feet. Hurdle heights are seemingly weird numbers from
    106.7cm doen to 68cm, but in imperial, they range from 3'6" down
    to 2"3" in 3 inch increments.

    Then it gets weirder. The full weight shot put is 16lb (approx
    7.26kg), but under and overage weights are purely metric - 3, 4,
    5, 6kg.

    And pole vault, well that's purely imperial. Pole lengths are in
    feet and loading weights are in pounds.

    Go figure. :D

    Very interesting stuff there. I did know that track and field had
    sort of a hybrid system in place. Sometimes I wish they still ran
    the "Mile" race instead of the 1500m. The "4-minute Mile" and all
    that.

    When I ran track in high school many years ago, everything was
    still imperial. I ran the Mile, 2-Mile, and one leg of the Mile-Relay
    (one lap of the track which was 440 yards). Everything was
    measured in yards (100, 220, 440) then. Don't remember about
    hurdle heights as I never did that. High jump and pole vault were
    in feet/inches.

    I would guess that the USA will eventually switch over to Metric,
    but I think that is still a long ways (decades) off.



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  • From Kurt Weiske@1:218/700 to Tony Langdon on Thursday, March 28, 2019 06:42:00
    Tony Langdon wrote to Kurt Weiske <=-

    The only metric "recipe" I have is Bisto instant gravy granules, which calls for 250 ml of boiling water and 4 tablespoons (no metric
    equivalent given) of gravy granules.

    Hmm, where did the recipe come from? Any idea of the source country? Though normally, recipes have some degree of tolerance, and it's the individual character than makes each meal a delight.

    It's on an imported container of gravy, not a recipe per se.



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  • From Kurt Weiske@1:218/700 to Dan Clough on Thursday, March 28, 2019 06:48:00
    Dan Clough wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    Apparently, converting the US public to metric isn't one of them.
    ;)

    I remember an attempt in the late 70s by the Department of
    Transportation - road signs appeared in Miles/KM, and cars started to
    come with speedometers in Miles and KM/hour. They disappeared in a
    couple of years, to be replaced by just MPH.

    That was also when they mandated that 55mph be at the top of the
    speedometer dial, and limit the speed to 85 mph. The needles usually
    went past 85, and some people found a reducing gear that GM made that
    would make the speedometer read MPH on the (higher) KM/h dial.



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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Dan Clough on Friday, March 29, 2019 08:08:00
    On 03-28-19 08:58, Dan Clough wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    Very interesting stuff there. I did know that track and field had
    sort of a hybrid system in place. Sometimes I wish they still ran
    the "Mile" race instead of the 1500m. The "4-minute Mile" and all
    that.

    They do sometimes run the mile at local meets, obviously because of its historical significance. When it's offered, the mile is a popular distance. I've never done it at a meet (doesn't fit what I do), but I did run a mile on the track last year out of season as a virtual race, which was run by the New York Road Runners (you can run their virtual races anywhere in the world). :)

    When I ran track in high school many years ago, everything was
    still imperial. I ran the Mile, 2-Mile, and one leg of the Mile-Relay (one lap of the track which was 440 yards). Everything was

    Hmm, a middle distance runner. :) I'm a sprinter, and my longest distance in track season is normally 400 metres. Normally I'd be right at the end of track season and looking to do some longer stuff for the winter, but I've got the Australian Masters in late April, so my track season has effectively been extended for a month (which suits me better). :)

    measured in yards (100, 220, 440) then. Don't remember about
    hurdle heights as I never did that. High jump and pole vault were
    in feet/inches.

    Hurdle heights obviously haven't changed, except for being relabelled with metric values. But the heights are still the original imperial ones. As I said, while pole vault heights and stand positions are metric, the poles themselves are still in feet and pounds. :) For example, I usually have my stands on 50cm, best height is 1.5 metres (a mere 20cm better than high jump - need more training ;) ). But I normally use a 13 foot pole with a 170 pound ratiung. :)

    I would guess that the USA will eventually switch over to Metric,
    but I think that is still a long ways (decades) off.

    It would appear so.


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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Kurt Weiske on Friday, March 29, 2019 08:09:00
    On 03-28-19 06:42, Kurt Weiske wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    It's on an imported container of gravy, not a recipe per se.

    But what is the source (or is that sauce? ;) ) country?


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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Kurt Weiske on Friday, March 29, 2019 08:29:00
    On 03-28-19 06:48, Kurt Weiske wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Dan Clough wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    Apparently, converting the US public to metric isn't one of them.
    ;)

    I remember an attempt in the late 70s by the Department of
    Transportation - road signs appeared in Miles/KM, and cars started to
    come with speedometers in Miles and KM/hour. They disappeared in a
    couple of years, to be replaced by just MPH.

    By then, the Australian metric conversion was complete (it was completed in the mid 70s).

    That was also when they mandated that 55mph be at the top of the speedometer dial, and limit the speed to 85 mph. The needles usually
    went past 85, and some people found a reducing gear that GM made that would make the speedometer read MPH on the (higher) KM/h dial.

    I've seen one of those conversion gears. My first car had one put in aftermarket by a third party before I got the car, to make its early 70s era mph speedo read km/h, but Dad removed it, because of course, it also screws up the odometer, and besides I can handle mph in a metric world. :)

    Interestingly, the car was a Holden, which was the Australian subsidiary of GM.
    So it might have been the same gear. This one fitted behind the dial, and the speedo cable attached to the other end of the converter.


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  • From Carol Shenkenberger@1:275/100 to Björn Felten on Saturday, March 30, 2019 12:11:56
    Re: Imperial vs. metric
    By: Bjrn Felten to Carol Shenkenberger on Tue Mar 26 2019 09:06 am

    I will still use a cup of this and ts of that
    bno matter what you say!

    We used cups in Sweden too. More than a century ago.

    But we figured out that there were more cup sizes than one, but only one deciliter. So in the name of reproducibility, we went for the universally adopted measurements.

    So to us a tablespoon equals 15ml, a teaspoon 5ml and a pinch 1ml. I bet neither tablespoons, teaspoons nor pinches are all of equal size in your kitchen. Unless of course you have them all defined by the metric system... 8-)

    Same here in measure except the pinch. Your's is 1/4 teaspoon and ours is 1/8 ts (roughly). Call it .5 ml

    xxcarol
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  • From Carol Shenkenberger@1:275/100 to Tony Langdon on Saturday, March 30, 2019 12:16:55
    Re: Re: Imperial vs. metric
    By: Tony Langdon to Bjrn Felten on Tue Mar 26 2019 08:51 pm

    So to us a tablespoon equals 15ml, a teaspoon 5ml and a pinch 1ml. I
    bet neither tablespoons, teaspoons nor pinches are all of equal size
    in your kitchen. Unless of course you have them all defined by the
    metric system... 8-)

    Actually, there are standard metric values for the units used in cooking, at least here in Australia.


    1 cup = 250ml
    1 tablespoon = 20ml
    1 teaspoon = 5ml

    It seems different countries use slightly different volumes for these culinary units.

    Yes, to my and Bjorn's aspect, your TB is 5ml bigger.

    xxcarol
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  • From Carol Shenkenberger@1:275/100 to Tony Langdon on Saturday, March 30, 2019 12:26:05
    Re: Re: Imperial vs. metric
    By: Tony Langdon to Dan Clough on Wed Mar 27 2019 09:11 am

    Yes, we (the USA) have done just fine without the metric system,
    and don't need (or want) it, thank you.

    And why not? I can't think of one good reason to hang on to imperial measurements, though for various reasons, some fields here still use imperial, at least unofficially, because in some areas, original measurements were based on imperial.

    Our fire competitions are like that. Most of the specs were laid down in the mid 1800s, when Australia was still a British colony. All the track measurements are unaltered (some newer events have been specified in metric though), but today are expressed in metric with ugly numbers, for the most part (some weights have been rounded off to the nearest kg though). The young people who join the team quickly get to learn some imperial measurements, because they're more useful when setting things up.

    Here, we use metrics when doing business things but in cooking, not so much.

    xxcarol
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  • From Carol Shenkenberger@1:275/100 to Kurt Weiske on Saturday, March 30, 2019 12:35:18
    Re: Re: Imperial vs. metric
    By: Kurt Weiske to Tony Langdon on Wed Mar 27 2019 10:06 am

    Tony Langdon wrote to Bjrn Felten <=-

    1 cup = 250ml
    1 tablespoon = 20ml
    1 teaspoon = 5ml

    I'll save these and put them on my refrigerator, for when I measure something more exactly than a pinch, a dash or a glug. :)

    Please add squizzle. Thats about 1/16 to 1/8 ts or .5 to .025 ml

    Oh, a glug is depending on the product but generally 3TB (45ml)

    xxcarol
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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Carol Shenkenberger on Sunday, March 31, 2019 08:07:00
    On 03-30-19 12:16, Carol Shenkenberger wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    1 cup = 250ml
    1 tablespoon = 20ml
    1 teaspoon = 5ml

    It seems different countries use slightly different volumes for these culinary units.

    Yes, to my and Bjorn's aspect, your TB is 5ml bigger.

    It would appear so. :)


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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Carol Shenkenberger on Sunday, March 31, 2019 08:09:00
    On 03-30-19 12:26, Carol Shenkenberger wrote to Tony Langdon <=-

    Here, we use metrics when doing business things but in cooking, not so much.

    Cooking here is generally either metric or whatever cups and spoons you have in the kitchen to measure with! :D Personally, I do a lot by eye anyway. :)


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  • From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Carol Shenkenberger on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 09:06:59
    (Moved from a private echo, where it was totally OT.)

    I will still use a cup of this and ts of that
    bno matter what you say!

    We used cups in Sweden too. More than a century ago.

    But we figured out that there were more cup sizes than one, but only one deciliter. So in the name of reproducibility, we went for the universally adopted measurements.

    So to us a tablespoon equals 15ml, a teaspoon 5ml and a pinch 1ml. I bet neither tablespoons, teaspoons nor pinches are all of equal size in your kitchen. Unless of course you have them all defined by the metric system... 8-)



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  • From Ward Dossche@2:292/854 to Björn Felten on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 09:18:20
    But we figured out that there were more cup sizes than one, ...

    I prefer the D-cup ... that's a decent handful.

    \%/@rd

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  • From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Ward Dossche on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 09:35:48
    But we figured out that there were more cup sizes than one, ...

    I prefer the D-cup ... that's a decent handful.

    Well, even there the cup sizes demonstrate the problem. They were nicknamed:

    A: egg cup
    B: tea cup
    C: coffee cup
    D: challenge cup

    As every tea drinker knows, the tea cup is about twice as big as a coffee cup...





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  • From Ward Dossche@2:292/854 to Björn Felten on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 10:00:26
    But we figured out that there were more cup sizes than one, ...

    I prefer the D-cup ... that's a decent handful.
    ...
    As every tea drinker knows, the tea cup is about twice as big as a
    coffee cup...

    I wasn't thinking of that kind of cup.

    \%/@rd

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  • From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Ward Dossche on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 13:08:09
    I prefer the D-cup ... that's a decent handful.
    ..
    As every tea drinker knows, the tea cup is about twice as big as a
    coffee cup...

    I wasn't thinking of that kind of cup.

    Do you seriously think that I thought so?



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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Björn Felten on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 07:40:00
    Bjrn Felten wrote to Carol Shenkenberger <=-

    I will still use a cup of this and ts of that
    bno matter what you say!

    We used cups in Sweden too. More than a century ago.

    But we figured out that there were more cup sizes than one,
    but only one deciliter. So in the name of reproducibility, we
    went for the universally adopted measurements.

    Nope. There is only one "cup" in this context. Eight ounces (by
    volume, not weight). Quite simple, really.

    So to us a tablespoon equals 15ml, a teaspoon 5ml and a pinch
    1ml. I bet neither tablespoons, teaspoons nor pinches are all of
    equal size in your kitchen. Unless of course you have them all
    defined by the metric system... 8-)

    Again, a tablespoon and a teaspoon are specific sizes by volume,
    nothing variable about them. A pinch is designed to be a
    judgement call.

    Yes, we (the USA) have done just fine without the metric system,
    and don't need (or want) it, thank you.



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  • From Björn Felten@2:203/2 to Dan Clough on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 14:08:59
    Eight ounces (by volume, not weight). Quite simple, really.

    If you (as usual) ignore the rest of the world, yes it's simple to the simpletons:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluid_ounce




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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Björn Felten on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 20:51:00
    On 03-26-19 09:06, Bjrn Felten wrote to Carol Shenkenberger <=-

    So to us a tablespoon equals 15ml, a teaspoon 5ml and a pinch 1ml. I bet neither tablespoons, teaspoons nor pinches are all of equal size in your kitchen. Unless of course you have them all defined by the metric system... 8-)

    Actually, there are standard metric values for the units used in cooking, at least here in Australia.


    1 cup = 250ml
    1 tablespoon = 20ml
    1 teaspoon = 5ml

    It seems different countries use slightly different volumes for these culinary units.


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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Björn Felten on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 18:58:00
    Bjrn Felten wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Eight ounces (by volume, not weight). Quite simple, really.

    If you (as usual) ignore the rest of the world, yes it's
    simple to the simpletons:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluid_ounce

    I think it was quite clear in my post that I was referring to the
    USA methods of measuring. Even said that in the last sentence of
    my post. Very convenient of you to snip out the context that
    would have made that clear, but lessened the "impact" of your
    silly statement.

    We (USA) don't give a rat's ass how you measure stuff, nor that
    you think you're superior in some vague way because of it.
    Really, we don't.



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  • From David Drummond@3:640/305 to Dan Clough on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 10:43:38
    On 27/03/2019 09:58, 1:123/115 wrote:

    We (USA) don't give a rat's ass how you measure stuff, nor that
    you think you're superior in some vague way because of it.
    Really, we don't.

    Could this be one of the reasons that the USA is so highly admired throughout the world? They go out of their way to get on with other people/cultures?

    No, perhaps not...

    --

    Gang warily
    David

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  • From Tony Langdon@3:633/410 to Dan Clough on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 09:11:00
    On 03-26-19 07:40, Dan Clough wrote to Bjrn Felten <=-

    Nope. There is only one "cup" in this context. Eight ounces (by
    volume, not weight). Quite simple, really.

    Actually, there are several "cups":

    US
    UK
    Australian
    Canadian
    Metric

    And they're all different, except that the Australian cup happens to equal the metric cup (250ml).

    Similarly for tablespoons and teaspoons, there's several different measures, depending on where you are.

    So to us a tablespoon equals 15ml, a teaspoon 5ml and a pinch
    1ml. I bet neither tablespoons, teaspoons nor pinches are all of
    equal size in your kitchen. Unless of course you have them all
    defined by the metric system... 8-)

    Again, a tablespoon and a teaspoon are specific sizes by volume,
    nothing variable about them. A pinch is designed to be a
    judgement call.

    Specific, but the exact value depends where you are. :)

    Yes, we (the USA) have done just fine without the metric system,
    and don't need (or want) it, thank you.

    And why not? I can't think of one good reason to hang on to imperial measurements, though for various reasons, some fields here still use imperial, at least unofficially, because in some areas, original measurements were based on imperial.

    Our fire competitions are like that. Most of the specs were laid down in the mid 1800s, when Australia was still a British colony. All the track measurements are unaltered (some newer events have been specified in metric though), but today are expressed in metric with ugly numbers, for the most part (some weights have been rounded off to the nearest kg though). The young people who join the team quickly get to learn some imperial measurements, because they're more useful when setting things up.

    I'm old enough to remember the latter days of the transition to mertic in the 1970s, and I'm still well versed in both systems. But I use metric for everything that's not specifically suited to imperial units.


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