• Weekly ARRL Letter

    From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, May 03, 2019 09:42:28
    The ARRL Letter
    May 2, 2019

    * ARRL Reply Comments Stress Need to Update Technician Privileges
    in a Digital World
    * World Scout Jamboree Gearing Up for Significant Amateur Radio
    Presence
    * Science and Technology: An Ultra-Small Transmitter for VLF?
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * ARRL's Free Exam Review for Ham Radio Updated
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * HamSCI, Ham Radio 2.0 to Combine Efforts at Dayton Hamvention
    2019
    * Annual Armed Forces Day Crossband Test Set for May 11
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL Reply Comments Stress Need to Update Technician Privileges in a
    Digital World

    In reply comments to the FCC (comments on comments already filed) on
    its Petition for Rule Making (RM-11828), ARRL has stressed that
    updating HF privileges for the entry-level Technician license "is the
    sole subject and intent" of the petition. ARRL filed its reply
    comments on April 29, urging the FCC to disregard comments irrelevant
    to its petition and maintaining that Technician privileges must be
    relevant within the context of today's technological environment.

    "[T]he increasingly rapid pace of change in communications
    technologies, coupled with the national need for self-training in
    science, technology, engineering, and math" necessitate the rule
    changes requested, ARRL asserted. "ARRL made its request because of
    the gap between today's digital technologies and the privileges
    accorded the current entry-level Technician license." ARRL
    characterized its proposal to update the rules as "balanced and
    modest."

    "If adopted, there would be no change to the operating privileges for
    all license classes other than those of the Technician class," ARRL
    said. In 2018, ARRL asked the FCC to expand HF privileges for
    Technician licensees to include limited phone privileges on 75, 40,
    and 15 meters, plus RTTY and digital mode privileges on 80, 40, and
    15 meters. The FCC invited comments on the proposal in April.

    ARRL pointed out that some comments filed on its petition address
    subjects related to other open proceedings rather than expanding
    Technician privileges, citing comments cross-filed in such
    proceedings as WT Docket 16-239, RM-11708, RM-11759, and RM-11831.
    "Those filings should be considered in the proceedings that they
    address, rather than here," ARRL said.

    ARRL said some opposition appears based on fears of increased
    interference potential due to additional digital operation by
    Technicians. "It is improbable that all, or even a majority, of
    Technician licensees suddenly would develop a passion for the same
    digital technology," ARRL said. "Our hope and expectation is that
    many will engage with digital modes on the high-frequency spectrum at
    issue, but it is unrealistic to suggest that every Technician
    licensee blessed with new privileges would suddenly appear on the
    same band."

    The comments note the development of very efficient digital modes,
    such as FT8, which occupies just 90 Hz of spectrum per signal. "The
    experience with FT8 clearly demonstrates the attraction of the
    digital modes and the spectrum efficiencies that can be achieved,"
    ARRL said. "This is why opening up limited digital opportunities to
    new radio amateurs so clearly would serve the broad public interest
    as well as the specific purposes of Amateur Radio in experimentation
    and innovation, as enumerated in the governing FCC rules."

    ARRL further said that comments regarding disagreement on the
    definition of encryption for masking the content of certain digital
    transmissions are also "out of place in this proceeding" and "should
    not delay initiation of a proceeding" proposing to update Technician
    privileges.

    "Technology has changed dramatically in the Amateur Radio domain, and
    ARRL believes the requested Technician license enhancement would
    foster the regulatory goals for the Amateur Service and continue to
    increase amateurs' historical experimentation and service in a
    meaningful way," ARRL concluded.

    +++
    World Scout Jamboree Gearing Up for Significant Amateur Radio
    Presence

    Amateur Radio will be a part of this summer's 24th World Scout
    Jamboree in West Virginia, the first World Jamboree held in North
    America since 1983. The Jamboree has chosen the theme "Unlock a New
    World." Thousands of Scouts and Scout leaders from some 200 countries
    are expected to attend. The Jamboree's Amateur Radio Exhibit will use
    the call sign NA1WJ -- North America's 1st World Jamboree. It will be
    on the air during the event, July 22 until August 2, at the Summit
    Bechtel Reserve, hosted by Canada, Mexico, and the US. Amateur Radio
    testing is expected to begin as early as July 14. Operating
    frequencies will be posted in real time via Facebook and Twitter or
    via an NA1WJ email group.

    "The goals of the Amateur Radio station at the World Scout Jamboree
    are to introduce Amateur Radio to Scouts and Scout leaders through
    hands-on participation in two-way communication with other stations
    across the globe. This activity will also serve as the Amateur Radio
    voice of the Jamboree," the World Scout Jamboree Amateur Radio
    Exhibit Operational Vision document states. Other facets of Amateur
    Radio at the Jamboree will include Amateur Radio direction finding
    (ARDF), Amateur Radio satellite contacts, and a scheduled Amateur
    Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) contact with an ISS
    crew member.

    "We also expect to launch one or two balloons with Amateur Radio
    payloads and track them as they cross the Atlantic," the vision
    document continues.

    Organizers are encouraging radio amateurs around the globe to get on
    the air during the World Jamboree to help NA1WJ demonstrate Amateur
    Radio for Jamboree visitors.

    The 2019 World Scout Jamboree operation at the Summit Bechtel Scout
    Reserve will take advantage of lessons learned by the K2BSA Amateur
    Radio operation during the 2013 and 2017 USA National Jamborees. It
    will also take advantage of the existing infrastructure, which
    includes three VHF/UHF repeaters installed by Icom America, as well
    as the utility poles for installing antennas. K2BSA ham gear stored
    in West Virginia includes antennas, rotators, and cables.

    Evening operation from NA1WJ will involve at least two operators
    using the buddy system. VHF/UHF repeaters will offer full coverage of
    the Jamboree area via handheld transceivers, facilitating networking
    as well as emergency communication. The exhibit will include an
    Amateur Radio station with the special event call sign W8J.

    The demonstration station will include multiple operating positions
    offering a variety of modes. These include six stations with 100 W HF
    transceivers, computer logging software, and large screen computer
    displays; two VHF/UHF stations for demonstrations and repeater
    monitoring, and two satellite communication systems. The antenna farm
    will include two HF directional antennas, three HF dipoles, three HF
    vertical antennas, VHF/UHF verticals and satellite antennas with
    azimuth and elevation control, a trailer-based crank-up tower, a
    five-band Yagi, a 40-meter rotatable dipole, and a 6-meter Yagi.

    Each station will be able to accommodate four participants at a time,
    plus one control operator. The goal is to give each participant up to
    about 10 minutes of operating time.

    The K2BSA Amateur Radio Association will host a "Radio Scouting"
    booth at Dayton Hamvention^^A(R) (Booth 2205 in Building 2).

    Science and Technology: An Ultra-Small Transmitter for VLF?

    A study, "A high Q piezoelectric resonator as a portable VLF
    transmitter," by Stanford University SLAC National Accelerator
    Laboratory researcher Mark A. Kemp et al., in the April 12, 2019,
    edition of Nature Communications describes using a small rod of
    lithium niobate and taking advantage of the material's piezoelectric
    properties to convert an imposed voltage to a mechanical effect,
    which in turn radiates an electromagnetic current.

    The National Accelerator Lab describes the research in an article,
    "SLAC develops novel compact antenna for communicating where radios
    fail," which said a new type of pocket-sized devices "could be used
    in portable transmitters for rescue missions and other challenging
    applications demanding high mobility" where conventional radios don't
    work, such as under water, through the ground, and over very long
    distances through air. "The device emits VLF radiation with
    wavelengths of tens to hundreds of miles. These waves travel long
    distances beyond the horizon and can penetrate environments that
    would block radio waves with shorter wavelengths."

    "Our device is also hundreds of times more efficient and can transmit
    data faster than previous devices of comparable size," Kemp, the
    project's principal investigator. "Its performance pushes the limits
    of what's technologically possible and puts portable VLF
    applications, like sending short text messages in challenging
    situations, within reach."

    A new compact VLF transmitter,
    developed and tested at SLAC,
    consists of a 4-inch-long
    piezoelectric crystal (clear rod at
    center) that generates VLF
    radiation. [Photo courtesy of Dawn
    Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator
    Laboratory]

    The paper by Kemp et al. points to the fact that large size and high
    loss render conventional transmitter techniques inadequate. "We show
    that a strain-based, piezoelectric transmitter can overcome many of
    the fundamental limitations of conventional electrically small
    antennas (ESA)," the paper's abstract reads. "These transmitters can
    resonate in a very small footprint while exhibiting low losses."

    Taking a deeper dive: "Traditionally, a disadvantage of passive
    high-Q antennas was low bandwidth. Utilizing piezoelectricity as the
    radiating element allows us to dynamically shift the transmitter
    resonant frequency. Therefore, high total Q (low loss) no longer
    constrains the system bandwidth. These are our fundamental
    advancements: Achieving an exceptionally high system Q with no
    external impedance matching network and an effective fractional
    bandwidth beyond the passive Bode-Fano limit. Although demonstrated
    at VLF, this concept straightforwardly scales to other frequency
    bands."

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    So Now What? Podcast

    "Finding the Right Club for You" is the focus of the new (May 2)
    episode of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers. If
    you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you have
    lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What?
    offers insights from those who've been just where you are now. New
    episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode
    weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    ARRL's Free Exam Review for Ham Radio Updated

    ARRL Exam Review for Ham Radio^â*Ť has been updated in advance of the
    release of the ninth edition of The ARRL General Class License Manual
    for Ham Radio. ARRL Exam Review is a free online resource for use
    with current editions of ARRL License Manuals. The service can be
    accessed via a web browser, and uses the official examination
    question pools to construct chapter-by-chapter reviews. Upon
    completing study, Exam Review helps the license candidate take
    practice exams with the same number and variety of questions that he
    or she will encounter on exam day. Practice tests can be taken over
    and over, scored in complete privacy, or even printed with an answer
    key. Exam Review includes quick feedback about the questions missed.

    The update to Exam Review and the new edition General Class License
    Manual coincides with a new General Class question pool released
    earlier this year by the National Conference of Volunteer Examiner
    Coordinators (NCVEC). The new 2019 - 2023 General Class question pool
    becomes effective on July 1, 2019 for examinations in the Amateur
    Radio Service. The 2015 - 2019 General Class pool remains in effect
    for exams given until June 30, 2019. ARRL Exam Review provides access
    to both the current and new General Class questions. (Read more.)
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: No sunspots were visible over the
    April 25 - May 1 reporting week, and so the average daily sunspot
    number dropped to zero after sitting at 8.1 during the previous 7
    days. Average daily solar flux declined from 70.6 to 67.5.
    Geomagnetic indicators were quiet, with average planetary A index at
    5.9, up from 4.7 in the previous week.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 and 70 on May 2 - 3; 72 on May 4 - 5; 74
    on May 6 - 9; 78 on May 10 - 16; 76, 72, and 70 on May 17 - 19; 69 on
    May 20 - 21; 68 on May 22; 67 on May 23 - June 2; 70 and 75 on June 3
    - 4; 78 on June 5 - 12; 76, 72, and 70 on June 13 - 15.

    Predicted planetary A index is 15 and 10 on May 2 - 3; 5 on May 4 -
    9; 8 on May 10; 5 on May 11 - 19; 8 on May 20; 5 on May 21 - 26; 10,
    14, 12, 8, and 5 on May 27 - 31; 10, 12, and 14 on June 1 - 3; 8 on
    June 4 - 6, and 5 on June 7 - 15.

    The New Yorker recently ran an article about aurora borealis tourism.

    Sunspot numbers for April 25 - May 1, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and
    0, with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.5, 67.2, 66.9,
    67.9, 66.9, 68.5, and 67.6, with a mean of 67.5. Estimated planetary
    A indices were 5, 4, 6, 5, 5, 5, and 11, with a mean of 5.9. Middle
    latitude A index was 4, 2, 5, 4, 6, 4, and 8, with a mean of 4.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * May 3 - 4 -- MIE 33 Contest (CW, phone)
    * May 4 -- FISTS Spring Slow Speed Sprint (CW)
    * May 4 - 5 -- New England QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * May 4 - 5 -- 7th Call Area QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * May 4 - 5 -- Indiana QSO Party (CW, phone)
    * May 4 -5 -- Delaware QSO Party (CW, phone)
    * May 4 - 5 -- 10-10 International Spring Contest, CW
    * May 4 - 5 -- SBMS 2.3 GHz and Up Contest (CW, phone)
    * May 4 -- Microwave Spring Sprint (CW, phone)
    * May 4 - 5 -- ARI International DX Contest (CW, phone)
    * May 4 - 5 -- Araucaria World Wide VHF Contest (CW, phone)
    * May 7 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    HamSCI, Ham Radio 2.0 to Combine Efforts at Dayton Hamvention 2019

    Thanks to support from the Yasme Foundation, the citizen science
    organization HamSCI and Ham Radio 2.0 will share space and combine
    efforts at Dayton Hamvention^A(R) 2019, which is also the 2019 ARRL
    National Convention. Their displays will be in Building 4 (Volta),
    which is between the food trucks and the flea market.

    The Ham Radio 2.0 area will serve to host a series of "booth talks"
    both by HamSCI presenters and presenters with a "2-point-0"
    perspective on operating and technology that looks to the future of
    ham radio. Presentations begin at 10 AM on Friday and continue
    through 3 PM on Saturday.

    +-------------------------------------------------------------------+
    |Friday, 10 AM |HR 2.0|Moonbounce Via the MIT |Marty Sullaway, |
    | | |Remote Linked EME Station|NN1C |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Friday, 11 AM |HamSCI|New Directions in |Bill Engelke, |
    | | |Sporadic-E Research |AB4EJ, University |
    | | | |of Alabama |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Friday, Noon |HR 2.0|Contesting with FT4: |John Pescatore, |
    | | |Issues and Opportunities |K3TN |
    | | |Going Forward | |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Friday, 1 PM |HamSCI|The Third Source of F2 |Carl Luetzelschwab,|
    | | |Region Variability |K9LA |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Friday, 2 PM |HR 2.0|How Real-Time Scoreboards|Victor Androsov, |
    | | |Change Contesting |VA2WA |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Friday, 3 PM |HamSCI|RBN & WSPRNet Response to|Nathaniel Frissell,|
    | | |September 2017 Solar |W2NAF, NJ Institute|
    | | |Flares and Storms |of Technology |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Saturday, 10 |HR 2.0|Balloon Pico Races |Bill Brown, WB8ELK |
    |AM | | | |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Saturday, 11 |HamSCI|To Be Announced | |
    |AM | | | |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Saturday, Noon|HR 2.0|Youth Contesting Program |Jocelyn Brault, |
    | | |in North America |KD8VRX, and Bryant |
    | | | |Rascoll, KG5HVO |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Saturday, 1 PM|HamSCI|Propagation on 630 and |Carl Luetzelschwab,|
    | | |2200 Meters |K9LA |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Saturday, 2 PM|HR 2.0|SOTA and New Methods of |Paula Uscian, K9IR |
    | | |Portable Operating | |
    |--------------+------+-------------------------+-------------------|
    |Saturday, 3 PM|HamSCI|HF Satellite Observations|Gareth Perry, NJ |
    | | |of Field Day |Institute of |
    | | | |Technology |
    +-------------------------------------------------------------------+

    In addition to the presentations, the Ham Radio 2.0 area will be home
    to a mini-booth staffed by members of the Young Amateurs Radio Club
    (YARC) and the Young Contesters Program (YCP) that is associated with
    the European Youngsters On The Air (YOTA) program. It's an
    opportunity to get acquainted with radio amateurs doing interesting
    things in interesting places.

    HamSCI also will offer the HamSCI Forum Saturday, 9:15 - 10:30 AM
    (Forum Room 4).

    Full details are on the HamSCI website.

    Annual Armed Forces Day Crossband Test Set for May 11

    The Army Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) will host the
    traditional military/Amateur Radio communication tests to mark the
    68th annual Armed Forces Day (AFD) on Saturday, May 11. The event is
    open to all radio amateurs. Armed Forces Day is May 18, but the AFD
    Crossband Military-Amateur Radio event traditionally takes place 1
    week earlier in order to avoid conflicting with Dayton
    Hamvention^A(R). Complete information, including military stations,
    modes, and frequencies, is available on the US Army MARS website.

    "For more than 50 years, military and amateur stations have taken
    part in this event, which is only an exercise scenario, designed to
    include hobbyist and government radio operators alike," the event
    announcement said. "The AFD Crossband Test is a unique opportunity to
    test two-way communications between military communicators and radio
    stations in the Amateur Radio Service, as authorized in 47 CFR
    97.111. These tests provide opportunities and challenges for radio
    operators to demonstrate individual technical skills in a
    tightly-controlled exercise scenario that does not impact any public
    or private communications."

    During the event, military stations in various locations will
    transmit on selected military frequencies and announce the specific
    ham frequencies they are monitoring.

    Military stations expected to be on the air for the event include
    those in Arizona, Japan, Hawaii, Okinawa, Washington, DC (and
    elsewhere in the contiguous states), the USS Midway, the USS
    Yorktown, the USS Iowa, LST-325, the US Naval Academy in Annapolis,
    and the Newport Naval Radio Station Museum in Rhode Island. The
    MARSCOMM and MARSRADIO nationwide networks will have multiple
    stations on the air across the continental US.

    An AFD message will be transmitted utilizing the Military Standard
    (MIL-STD) serial PSK waveform (M110) followed by MIL-STD Wide Shift
    FSK (850 Hz RTTY), as described in MIL-STD 188-110A/B. Technical
    information is available. The AFD message will also be sent in CW and
    RTTY, as indicated on the full schedule. Anyone wanting a QSL should
    complete the request form on the MARS website.
    In Brief...

    School Club Roundup (SCR) certificates are now available for the
    February 2019 event as well as for any future SCRs. Download these
    via the Certificate menu item on the ARRL Contests Portal. Top
    US/Canada performers included the Russell Elementary Amateur Radio
    Club (KM4RE) in the Elementary/Primary category; Schofield Middle
    School Ham Radio Club (N4SMS) in Middle/Intermediate/Junior High
    category; LASA High School Amateur Radio Club (K5LBJ) in the Senior
    High category, and Purdue University (W9YB) in the College/University
    category. Complete results are on the School Club Roundup Results
    page.

    +++

    Some 50 students in Gujarat, India, on April 12 were introduced to
    Amateur Radio, satellites, and Amateur Radio on the International
    Space Station (ARISS). Rajesh Vagadia, VU2EXP, gave a brief talk on
    Amateur Radio, the ISS, ham satellites, astronauts, and the April
    ARISS SSTV event. During a visible pass of the ISS, Vagadia, using a
    three-element Yagi, handheld transceiver, and a recording device, was
    able to record two SSTV images. "It was an exciting experience for
    all, sighting the ISS, and at the same time getting signals from it,"
    Vagadia commented afterward. "[It] felt like having a handshake with
    the ISS crew!" Decoded images were shared with all students as
    souvenirs.

    +++

    AMSAT Academy will take place on Thursday, May 16, the day before
    Dayton Hamvention^A(R). AMSAT says this is a unique opportunity for
    both beginners and advanced satellite operators to learn about
    Amateur Radio in space and working the FM, linear transponder, and
    digital satellites now in orbit. AMSAT Academy will take place on
    Thursday, May 16, 9 AM until 5 PM, at the Dayton Amateur Radio
    Association (DARA) clubhouse, 6619 Bellefontaine Road, in Dayton,
    Ohio. The $85 registration fee includes a full day of instruction
    taught by some of the most-accomplished AMSAT operators; a digital
    copy of Getting Started with Amateur Satellites (2019 ed.); 1 year of
    AMSAT Basic membership; pizza buffet lunch, and an invitation to the
    Thursday night AMSAT get together at Ticket Pub & Eatery in Fairborn.
    Registration closes on May 10 and will not be available at the door.
    No refunds or cancellations. Register at the AMSAT Store.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * May 5 -- Eastern Pennsylvania Section Convention, Bristol,
    Pennsylvania
    * May 17 - 19 -- Dayton Hamvention -- ARRL National Convention,
    Xenia, Ohio
    * May 31 - June 1 -- Arizona State Convention, Prescott, Arizona
    * May 31 - June 2 -- Northwestern Division Convention, Seaside,
    Oregon
    * June 1 -- Georgia Section Convention, Marietta, Georgia
    * June 1 - 2 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention, Prospect,
    Pennsylvania
    * June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention (Ham-Com), Plano,
    Texas
    * June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention, Owensville, Ohio
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From mark lewis@1:3634/12.73 to Sean Dennis on Friday, May 03, 2019 12:48:12
    On 2019 May 03 09:42:28, you wrote to All:

    A new compact VLF transmitter,
    developed and tested at SLAC,
    consists of a 4-inch-long
    piezoelectric crystal (clear rod at
    center) that generates VLF
    radiation. [Photo courtesy of Dawn
    Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator
    Laboratory]

    you may want to cut out pictures and their captions... that or place a link for
    the pics... i stripped them when i was doing them because they don't realy make any sense in our text-only environment...

    )\/(ark

    Always Mount a Scratch Monkey
    Do you manage your own servers? If you are not running an IDS/IPS yer doin' it wrong...
    ... If you can't learn to do it well, learn to enjoy doing it badly.
    ---
    * Origin: (1:3634/12.73)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to mark lewis on Friday, May 03, 2019 14:24:29
    Hello mark,

    03 May 19 12:48 at you wrote to me:

    you may want to cut out pictures and their captions... that or place a link for the pics... i stripped them when i was doing them because
    they don't realy make any sense in our text-only environment...

    I'll have to figure out how to do that since the pictures all have alt tags as per spec.

    Later,
    Sean

    ... If wishes were horses beggars might ride. - John Ray
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Holger Granholm@2:20/228 to Mark Lewis on Saturday, May 04, 2019 13:51:00
    In a message on 05-03-19 mark lewis said to Sean Dennis:

    Hello Mark,

    On 2019 May 03 09:42:28, you wrote to All:

    A new compact VLF transmitter,
    developed and tested at SLAC,
    consists of a 4-inch-long
    piezoelectric crystal (clear rod at
    center) that generates VLF
    radiation. [Photo courtesy of Dawn
    Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator
    Laboratory]

    you may want to cut out pictures and their captions... that or place
    a link for the pics... i stripped them when i was doing them because
    they don't realy make any sense in our text-only environment...

    That's no problem since it's still easy to read, or if one wants to edit
    it before printing out the bulletin.


    Have a nice day,

    Holger

    .. Let's all raise a toast to the ghost we love the most.
    -- MR/2 2.30


    --- PCBoard (R) v15.22 (OS/2) 2
    * Origin: Coming to you from the Sunny Aland Islands. (2:20/228)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, May 10, 2019 06:07:11
    The ARRL Letter
    May 9, 2019

    * Mobile Event App will Help Dayton Hamvention Visitors to Navigate
    the Show
    * Dayton Hamvention to Provide Information Radio Station on 1620 AM
    * High-Altitude Celebration at SAQ
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * ARRL Field Day Site Locator is Live, Promotional Material and FD
    Gear Now Available
    * May 14 FT4 Mock Contest Session Canceled, New WSJT-X Beta Version
    Pending
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Spectrum: FCC Adopts Order on Use of Bands above 24 GHz for
    Next-Gen Wireless
    * Hams Help Trace "Mystery" Signal Disrupting Keyless Entry Devices
    in Ohio
    * Former ARRL Headquarters Staffer Ellen White, W1YL, is Krenkel
    Medalist
    * DX Voice from Mount Athos Monk Apollo, SV2ASP, SK
    * "Put Howard to Work" Event Canceled
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Mobile Event App will Help Dayton Hamvention Visitors to Navigate the
    Show

    Dayton Hamvention^A(R) 2019, host of the ARRL National Convention,
    will mark the debut of a free mobile event app to help attendees
    navigate the extensive Hamvention program, activities, and exhibits
    using their smartphones or tablets. Hamvention is May 17 - 19 at the
    Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio.

    A collaborative effort between ARRL and Dayton Hamvention, the app
    was developed by TripBuilder Media^â*Ť. ARRL Convention and Event
    Coordinator Eric Casey, KC2ERC, has been readying the app, with
    content contributions from Dayton Hamvention Committee members, and
    he has introduced it in a new ARRL YouTube video.

    "Our goal is to have all of the printed program content mirrored in
    the app, organized so that you can schedule the forums you're
    planning to attend, and find the exhibitors you want to visit," Casey
    said. In addition to including exhibits and forums, the app will
    highlight schedules and details for affiliated events, such as
    dinners and other special gatherings, and a feature to allow
    attendees to follow the hourly prize drawings from wherever they are.

    "Use the app so you don't miss a winning ticket!" Casey suggested.
    The Dayton Hamvention Prize Committee will populate the app as
    winners are drawn.

    Attendees are also encouraged to tap on the "MyProfile" icon to
    optionally include their name and call sign, email address, and any
    other information they'd like to share with other attendees. "One of
    the neat features of this app is connecting with other Dayton
    Hamvention guests who choose to share their contact info," says
    Casey. "The icon labeled 'Scan Badge' will allow users to scan a QR
    Code displayed on a second device using the 'MyBadge' icon --
    instantly connecting your shared contact information with another
    ham. After all, Dayton Hamvention and the ARRL National Convention is
    where you meet with other members and friends from this great big
    world of Amateur Radio."

    [IMG]The free 2019 Dayton Hamvention event app is available for both
    Apple and Android smart devices. A web-browser version is also
    available, which is optimized for nearly any browser or other mobile
    device type. Visit your app store to download the Apple and Android
    versions (search "Hamvention") or find links on the ARRL National
    Convention web page. If you are reading this article on a mobile
    device, click here to be automatically redirected to the appropriate
    app store to download the app, or to be redirected to the web browser
    version. Email with any questions about the app.

    +++
    Dayton Hamvention to Provide Information Radio Station on 1620 AM

    Dayton Hamvention^A(R) again will provide an Information Radio
    Station at 1620 kHz on the AM band to help ease the trip for inbound
    attendees. Hamvention will host ARRL's 2019 National Convention.

    The low-power station will offer traffic, weather, parking, and event
    information to motorists as they approach Xenia, which is bracing to
    handle an influx of nearly 30,000 visitors -- roughly doubling the
    city's population for the weekend.

    Due to the web of two-lane roads that serves the Greene County
    Fairgrounds and Expo Center, a sophisticated shuttle-bus operation
    will be in place to alleviate traffic congestion. The 1620 AM signal
    will blanket Xenia and be audible in surrounding Greene and
    Montgomery counties, directing approaching attendees to special
    parking facilities.

    The service is being provided to Dayton Hamvention by Information
    Station Specialists of Zeeland, Michigan, which this year will
    utilize a newly designed, high-efficiency/high-capacity antenna. The
    transmitter and antenna system will be on display during Dayton
    Hamvention at Booth 6503.
    High-Altitude Celebration at SAQ

    On May 1, the Day of Industrial Culture in Europe sponsored "WORK it
    OUT," during which workers all over the continent displayed their
    skills in choreographed dance. The occasion involved thousands of
    dancers in a "massive Pan-European dance event" at 1500 UTC.
    Participants included a dozen women and men at SAQ in Sweden -- the
    VLF Alexanderson alternator transmitter and UNESCO World Heritage
    Site -- all apparently unafraid of heights.

    [IMG]Video, likely shot by a drone and posted on YouTube, shows
    appropriately equipped workers arrayed across the T-bar support of
    one of SAQ's tall antenna support towers, dancing to "WORK it OUT," a
    techno-style theme based largely on Beethoven's "Ode to Joy." They
    joined other worker groups -- displaying various levels of dancing
    prowess -- who took part in the May Day event at 41 industrial
    monuments in 12 European countries.

    SAQ maintains a 1920s-vintage electromechanical radio transmitter
    once used for transatlantic telecommunication in that pre-high-power
    transmitting tube era. The nearly century-old Alexanderson Alternator
    at SAQ transmits on CW at 17.2 kHz on special occasions from
    Grimeton, Sweden. Read more about SAQ in the July 2019 issue of QST.

    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "It's About Time!" is the topic of the new (May 9) episode of the
    ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet,
    or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to
    doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone
    or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can
    also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration
    required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free
    Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never
    listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.
    ARRL Field Day Site Locator is Live, Promotional Material and FD Gear
    Now Available

    Amateur Radio's most popular operating event, ARRL Field Day is June
    22 - 23. See the May issue of QST, page 85, for the official Field
    Day announcement. The complete 2019 ARRL Field Day packet is online.

    The Field Day site locator is now up and running, and by mid-week,
    475 sites already were in the database. To find a Field Day site near
    you, enter your town and state in the "Location or Call Sign" box at
    the upper left. Listings also are available by state or Canadian
    province. To add a site, visit the Add Field Day Station page.
    Information on promoting Field Day is available. Also, visit the
    Field Day social media page for information on promoting your Field
    Day operation via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and
    YouTube.

    The ARRL Public Relations Committee will host a series of live
    video/audio conference calls every Thursday starting on May 9 to help
    ARRL PIOs with their Field Day publicity efforts. Field Day public
    service announcements (PSAs) are set to be posted to the ARRL Field
    Day web page this week.

    Official FD 2019 Gear!

    Official Field Day gear and supplies available from ARRL including
    pocket T-shirts, hats, pins, patches, stickers, and coffee mugs are a
    great way to acknowledge -- and commemorate -- your participation in
    this most popular on-the-air operating event in Amateur Radio.

    Encourage club members, family, friends, and prospective hams to take
    part using ARRL Field Day with recruitment posters and attractive
    "Get on the Air" (GOTA) pins for those newcomers.

    ARRL's new Radio Communications vinyl banner is perfect for showing
    off Amateur Radio at ARRL Field Day, any public exhibit or
    recruitment display. It's good for indoor and outdoor use and
    reusable for years to come.

    Clubs are encouraged to order early. Place a group order and pay just
    $12.50 shipping for all orders over $50 (while supplies last). Get
    your 2019 ARRL Field Day supplies from the ARRL online store or by
    calling (888) 277-5289 in the US, Monday through Friday, from 8 AM to
    5 PM Eastern Time. Outside the US, call (860) 594-0355.

    The complete 2019 ARRL Field Day packet is online. ARRL encourages
    participants to register their Field Day operations using the FD Site
    Locator.
    May 14 FT4 Mock Contest Session Canceled, New WSJT-X Beta Version
    Pending

    A second hour-long FT4 "practice contest" set for May 14 UTC has been
    cancelled, following the success of an initial mock contest held on
    May 9 UTC (the evening of Wednesday, May 8, in continental US time
    zones). The event followed ARRL RTTY Roundup rules, with everyone
    working everyone. WSJT-X program suite developer Joe Taylor, K1JT,
    was among those jumping into the fray. He called the exercise "very
    useful" and has drawn some preliminary conclusions as to how the FT4
    protocol functions in a contest setting.

    "FT4 works well, but -- as implemented WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc5 -- it has
    some rough spots and performance issues," Taylor said in a post to
    the Yahoo WSJT Meteor Scatter and Weak Signal Group. "Many of these
    have been fixed already during this beta-testing period, and more
    improvements are still to come."

    Taylor said a second mock contest session using the current -rc5
    "release candidate" (beta version) would not be helpful, and it's not
    convenient for the developers to build and distribute -rc6 in time
    for a session early next week, a few days before the Dayton
    Hamvention. "Instead, we are aiming now to release WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc6
    about 2 weeks later -- probably in the last week of May or the first
    week of June," Taylor said. "Another mock contest practice session
    will be scheduled soon after that release." The current -rc5 beta
    version will expire automatically on June 7.

    Post observations and comments to the Yahoo WSJT Group reflector or
    to the WSJT Development Group Mailing List. Read more.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: We saw zero sunspots April 21 - May
    2, but on May 3 sunspots returned. The average daily sunspot number
    rose to 16.1 this week, and the average daily solar flux increased as
    well, from 67.5 to 73.5. Both the average middle latitude and
    planetary A index this week were 6.6, and last week those numbers
    were 4.7 and 5.9, respectively.

    Predicted solar flux is 75 on May 9 - 11; 73 on May 12 - 15; 74 and
    76 on May 16 - 17; 72 on May 18 - 20; 68 on May 21 - 22; 67 on May 23
    - 26; 69, 68, 69, 70, and 72 on May 27 - 31; 75 on June 1; 76 on June
    2 - 13; 72 on June 14 - 16; 68 on June 17 - 18, and 67 on June 19 -
    22.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on May 9 - 10; 14 and 12 on May 11 -
    12; 5 on May 13 - 19; 8 on May 20; 5 on May 21 - 27; 10, 12, 8, and
    10 on May 28 - 31; 5, 12, and 14 on June 1 - 3; 8 on June 4 - 6; 5 on
    June 7 - 15; 8 on June 16, and 5 on June 17 - 22.

    Sunspot numbers for May 2 - 8 were 0, 11, 12, 14, 25, 27, and 24,
    with a mean of 16.1. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 69.2, 69.8, 72.3,
    73.5, 76, 78.7, and 75.3, with a mean of 73.5. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 12, 7, 10, 4, 5, 5, and 3, with a mean of 6.6. Middle
    latitude A index was 13, 8, 9, 4, 5, 5, and 2, with a mean of 6.6.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * May 11 -- FISTS Spring Unlimited Sprint (CW)
    * May 11 - 12 -- CQ - M International DX Contest (CW, phone)
    * May 11 - 12 -- VOLTA WW RTTY Contest
    * May 11 - 12 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * May 11 - 12 -- Arkansas QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * May 11 - 12 -- 50 MHz Spring Sprint (CW, phone)
    * May 12 -- WAB 7 MHz Phone/CW
    * May 13 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * May 13 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (SSB)
    * May 16 -- NAQCC CW Sprint

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Spectrum: FCC Adopts Order on Use of Bands above 24 GHz for Next-Gen
    Wireless

    The FCC on April 12 adopted a Report and Order (GN Docket 14-177)
    aimed at making available millimeter wave (mmW) spectrum at or above
    24 GHz for fifth-generation (5G) wireless, Internet of Things, and
    other advanced spectrum-based services, including satellite broadband
    services. The FCC first adopted rules to allow Fixed-Satellite
    Service (FSS) Earth stations to be individually licensed to transmit
    in the 50.4 - 51.4 GHz band using criteria identical to those
    applicable in the 24.75 - 25.25 GHz band.

    "This action will allow FSS operators to provide faster, more
    advanced services to their customers," the FCC said in announcing the
    action.

    The Commission also established a coordination process to accommodate
    the military's potential need for additional sites in the upper 37
    GHz band (37.6 - 38.6 GHz band) in limited circumstances, while
    protecting the interests of non-federal licensees in this band.

    "The[se] steps are an integral step toward the auction of the Upper
    37 GHz, 39 GHz, and 47 GHz spectrum bands slated to begin later this
    year," the FCC said.

    Hams Help Trace "Mystery" Signal Disrupting Keyless Entry Devices in
    Ohio

    A recent article in The New York Times reported that many garage door
    openers and keyless vehicle entry fobs in an Ohio town near Cleveland
    mysteriously stopped working. While the article invoked The X-Files
    and hinted initially that a NASA research center might be involved,
    the cause was not so much mystifying as arcane.

    "Garage door repair people, local ham radio enthusiasts, and other
    volunteer investigators descended on the neighborhood with various
    meters," the May 4 article by Heather Murphy recounted. "Everyone
    agreed that something powerful was interfering with the radio
    frequency that many fobs rely on, but no one could identify the
    source."

    More than a dozen residents reported intermittent issues getting
    their key fobs and garage door openers to operate, and most lived
    within a few blocks of each other. At one point, the local power
    utility started shutting off power to areas where the strongest RF
    signal was detected, but the signal persisted. Dan Dalessandro,
    WB8ZQH, a TV repairer, was among several hams who investigated. He
    initially picked up "little blips" on a signal detector, but finally,
    on one block and at a particular house, the signal was quite loud.

    "The source of the problem was a homebrew, battery-operated device
    designed by a local resident to alert him if someone was upstairs
    when he was working in his basement," the Times reported. "It did so
    by turning off a light." The inventor, not identified for privacy
    concerns, had no malicious intent nor any no inkling that his device
    was wreaking havoc on the neighborhood until a North Olmstead City
    Council member and a volunteer knocked on his door. The device
    operated on 315 MHz, the frequency many keyless-entry devices use
    under FCC Part 15 rules. The device's battery was removed, the signal
    stopped, and all who were involved breathed sighs of relief.
    Former ARRL Headquarters Staffer Ellen White, W1YL, is Krenkel
    Medalist

    ARRL Headquarters staff alumna and Life Member Ellen White, W1YL, has
    been awarded the Russian E.T. Krenkel Medal, a prestigious award
    granted to individuals and organizations for outstanding global
    contributions to Amateur Radio.

    First licensed in 1946, White had already learned Morse code in high
    school, and even today, she only rarely operates any other mode. She
    served for more than 25 years (1952 - 1978) on the Headquarters
    staff, at one point heading up ARRL contesting activities. She
    retired as Deputy Communications Manager and became QST "How's DX?"
    editor. On her own time, she recorded QST on tape for the vision
    impaired through the US Library of Congress talking book program.

    Ellen White, W1YL [Photo courtesy of
    MABUHAY DXstitch]

    Her husband Bob White, W1CW (SK), was ARRL DXCC manager. Their son
    Jim White, K4OJ (SK), also once served on the ARRL HQ staff and was
    president of the Florida Contest Group, which now holds his call
    sign.

    For several years now, Ellen White has been operating via the W7RN
    remote contest station in Nevada to stay active on CW as W1YL/7,
    usually on 40 meters at around 1000 UTC. She is on the roster of the
    A-1 Operators Club and has served as a West Central Florida Assistant
    Section Manager. The article "A Conversation with Ellen White, W1YL,"
    by Rosalie White, K1STO (no relation), appeared in the May/June 2015
    edition of NCJ.

    "It has been quite a ride and one I could not have made without ham
    radio," White told ARRL. "I am proud and delighted to be a chosen
    recipient of 'The Krenkel.""

    QST was awarded a Krenkel Medal in 2018.

    The award's namesake, Ernst Teodorovich Krenkel, was a radio amateur
    who, over the years, used the call signs RAEM, U3AA, and UA3AA.
    Krenkel's image appears on postage stamps from the USSR and Russia,
    and he authored a biography entitled My Callsign is RAEM. Read more.
    -- Thanks to George Wagner, K5KG
    DX Voice from Mount Athos Monk Apollo, SV2ASP, SK

    Mount Athos' best-known radio amateur, Monk Apollo, SV2ASP, died on
    May 5 after complications resulting from cancer. He was 64. Monk
    Apollo was essentially the lone DX voice from Mount Athos, the 20th
    most-wanted DXCC entity, where he operated from his Orthodox
    Monastery of Docheiariou. Born into a large family in western Greece,
    he became a monk in 1973, eventually joining the ascetic monastery on
    Mount Athos in 1980.

    When the need for reliable communication from the monastery surfaced
    in the 1980s, Monk Apollo followed a recommendation to become a radio
    amateur, which he did in 1988. He had to wait for permission from the
    Holy Council to operate, however, before he was able to get on the
    air for the first time in 1990. He celebrated his 10th anniversary on
    the air with the special call sign SY2A.

    Monk Iakovos, SV2RSG, who lives at Koutloumousiou Holy Monastery on
    Mount Athos, was licensed in 2015 and has been active on the air. He
    is a member of DX Plus Hellenic Radio Amateur Team.

    Peter Vekinis, KH6VP, has visited Mount Athos a few times recently to
    help Monk Iakovos, and an article on his experiences there will
    appear in an upcoming issue of QST. Read more.

    "Put Howard to Work" Event Canceled

    In late April, ARRL had announced that ARRL CEO Howard Michel,
    WB2ITX, would be on the air at W1AW on Monday, May 13, giving ARRL
    members a chance to chat with the CEO and get to know him better as a
    ham. An issue was raised, however, that this event may be a potential
    FCC rule violation.

    The particular rule is AS:97.113: "A station is also not allowed to
    transmit communication in which the station licensee or control
    operator has a pecuniary interest, including communications on behalf
    of an employer." Given that ARRL is Michel's employer and that an
    effort was made to publicize an event at which members of the
    organization could chat with the CEO, such an event could be
    perceived as a benefit to the organization. So, out of an abundance
    of caution and to avoid any potential violation of FCC rules, or even
    the appearance of a violation, Michel decided to cancel plans for the
    "Put Howard to Work" event.

    "I've operated W1AW before and will continue to do so in the future,"
    Michel said. "I hope to meet many of you on the air, but only as part
    of my regular ham radio activities and not as part of an
    ARRL-promoted event."

    The "Put Howard to Work!" event was conceived by the ICQ Amateur/Ham
    Radio Podcast, on which Michel was a guest on March 31. "We are
    disappointed, of course, at this turn of events, but fully understand
    and endorse ARRL's decision," said ICQ Podcast Presenter Frank
    Howell, K4FMH.
    In Brief...

    Support ARRL when shopping for Mother's Day. Mother's Day is Sunday,
    May 12. If you're looking for the perfect gift, shop at AmazonSmile
    and choose American Radio Relay League, Inc. (ARRL) as your charity
    of choice. With every purchase you make at AmazonSmile, Amazon will
    make a contribution to ARRL. This helps the League to extend its
    reach in public service, advocacy, education, technology, and
    membership. Make Mom smile, and get her something special this year
    while supporting Amateur Radio and ARRL. Help to support ARRL all
    year long: Bookmark ARRL's link and support Amateur Radio and ARRL
    every time you shop online.

    +++

    National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting will expand its
    hours during Dayton Hamvention^A(R). The museum, located at the site
    of the former Voice of America Bethany Relay Station in West Chester,
    Ohio (between Dayton and Cincinnati, off the I-75 Tylersville Road
    exit), will be open Thursday and Friday, May 16 and 17, 4 - 9 PM;
    Saturday, May 18, ^ 1 - 9 PM, and Sunday, May 19, 1 - 5 PM during
    Dayton Hamvention 2019 weekend. The WC8VOA station also will be open.
    The museum includes a comprehensive collection of Drake Amateur Radio
    gear. More information is on the VOA Museum website.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * May 17 - 19 -- Dayton Hamvention -- ARRL National Convention,
    Xenia, Ohio
    * May 31 - June 1 -- Arizona State Convention, Prescott, Arizona
    * May 31 - June 2 -- Northwestern Division Convention, Seaside,
    Oregon
    * June 1 -- Georgia Section Convention, Marietta, Georgia
    * June 1 - 2 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention, Prospect,
    Pennsylvania
    * June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention (Ham-Com), Plano,
    Texas
    * June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention, Owensville, Ohio
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
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    Subscribe to...
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, May 17, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    May 16, 2019

    * ARRL Invites Applications for Volunteer Monitor Positions
    * FCC is Not Reinstating a Vanity Call Sign Fee
    * Radio Amateurs to Demonstrate Emergency Messaging Capabilities
    for Red Cross, FEMA
    * FCC Chairman Proposes Call Blocking By Default to Combat
    Robocalls
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Arizona Homeowners Association and Hams Agree on Outdoor Antenna
    Guidelines
    * First Ham Satellite -- OSCAR 1 -- will Join AMSAT's 50th
    Anniversary Celebration at Dayton
    * ITU Working Party 5A1 Completes Draft New Report on WRC-19 Agenda
    Item 1.1
    * Dayton Hamvention and ARISS Working Together Again this Year
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right!
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL Invites Applications for Volunteer Monitor Positions

    ARRL is now accepting applications from individuals interested in
    becoming part of the new Volunteer Monitor program, a joint
    undertaking of the FCC and ARRL. The program seeks volunteers who --
    working under the direction of ARRL -- will monitor and survey the
    Amateur Radio bands both to detect improper activity and to recognize
    exemplary on-the-air behavior.

    Prospective Volunteer Monitors must be ARRL members. They will
    undergo a training and certification program administered by ARRL,
    and will be vetted by ARRL through at least one oral interview and a
    preliminary evaluation by ARRL staff. Such requirements will continue
    for Volunteer Monitors once they are selected.

    Volunteer Monitors will serve 3-year terms at the pleasure of ARRL,
    and ARRL will reserve the right to terminate the participation of any
    Volunteer Monitor for any reason.

    Volunteer Monitors must be able to utilize state-of-the-art receiving
    equipment and to access no-cost remote receive sites, if requested.
    Applicants must possess strong writing and communication skills and
    an understanding of the importance of thorough documentation. They
    must have basic word processing and data entry skills and be able to
    send such information, including recordings, to ARRL electronically.

    Applicants must have no history of warning letters or other
    enforcement-related action from the FCC, must hold a Technician or
    higher class license, and must have been licensed for at least 3
    years.

    Applicants should send applications to volunteer-monitor@arrl.org for
    processing.

    In February, Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, was named to oversee the
    development and implementation phases of the Volunteer Monitor
    program, which will replace the Official Observer (OO) program.
    Hollingsworth once handled Amateur Radio enforcement for the FCC.

    +++
    FCC is Not Reinstating a Vanity Call Sign Fee

    An erroneous report this week suggested that the FCC planned to again
    impose an Amateur Radio vanity call sign application (regulatory) fee
    of $70 for the 10-year term. This incorrect conclusion resulted from
    an incomplete reading of the May 7 FCC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
    (NPRM) in the matter of the assessment and collection of regulatory
    fees for fiscal year 2019.

    Although the Schedule of Regulatory Fees does show a $7 annual fee
    for Amateur Radio vanity call signs, a boldface heading in that
    section of the NPRM states, "REGULATORY FEES. This section is no
    longer in effect as it has been amended by RAY BAUM'S Act of 2018..."
    Section 9(e)(2) of RAY BAUM'S Act gives the Commission discretion to
    exempt a party from paying regulatory fees when the FCC determines
    that the cost of collection exceeds the amount collected. A new
    section 9(e)(1) incorporated the Amateur Radio vanity fee exemption
    from FCC rules into the statute.

    The NPRM makes clear in several other places that regulatory fees no
    longer apply to Amateur Radio licenses. The FCC eliminated the
    regulatory fee for Amateur Radio vanity call signs in 2015.

    +++

    Radio Amateurs to Demonstrate Emergency Messaging Capabilities for
    Red Cross, FEMA

    Just days ahead of the 2019 hurricane season, dozens of hams along
    the US East Coast will demonstrate Amateur Radio's ability to deliver
    messages without commercial power, infrastructure, or permanently
    established stations for officials of the American Red Cross and the
    Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The Thursday, May 23,
    event will take place in coordination with ARRL, during a joint
    meeting with Red Cross and FEMA officials in Baltimore. The
    demonstration will be a mock response to a simulated disaster
    scenario -- a major hurricane with mass casualties striking the east
    coast. Amateur Radio operators at portable stations from New England
    to the Carolinas will deliver messages to W1AW, which will then
    coordinate and deliver the information to officials attending the
    joint FEMA-Red Cross meeting in Baltimore.

    Messaging will be handled using digital modes, which can allow for
    the transmission of images as well as text, as a showcase for the
    full range of modern Amateur Radio technology. The American Red Cross
    will also have a NexGen Emergency Response Vehicle parked at W1AW in
    Connecticut as part of the training exercise, which will take place
    from 1330 to 1530 UTC.

    ARRL and its members have a long history of working with emergency
    response agencies, such as the American Red Cross and FEMA, to
    provide or support communication in times of disaster for served
    agencies and partners. A principal served agency, the Red Cross
    shelters, feeds, and provides emotional support to victims of
    disasters.

    +++
    FCC Chairman Proposes Call Blocking By Default to Combat Robocalls

    FCC Chair Ajit Pai is proposing action to help consumers block
    unwanted robocalls. He has circulated a declaratory ruling that, if
    adopted, would allow phone companies to block unwanted calls to their
    customers by default. In addition, companies could allow consumers to
    block calls not on their own contacts lists. A draft Further Notice
    of Proposed Rulemaking would propose a safe harbor for providers that
    implement network-wide blocking of calls that fail caller
    authentication under the SHAKEN/STIR framework, once it is
    implemented.

    FCC Chair Ajit Pai.

    "Allowing call blocking by default could be a big benefit for
    consumers who are sick and tired of robocalls," Pai said. "By making
    it clear that such call blocking is allowed, the FCC will give voice
    service providers the legal certainty they need to block unwanted
    calls from the outset." Pai encouraged carriers to start providing
    these services free of charge and by default to current and future
    customers.

    According to an FCC news release, many voice providers have held off
    developing and deploying call-blocking tools by default because of
    uncertainty about whether these tools are legal. "Allowing default
    call blocking by voice providers could significantly increase
    development and consumer adoption of such tools," the FCC said. "This
    blocking could be based on analytics and consumer 'white lists.'
    Similar analytics are currently used by third-party developers in
    call-blocking apps." The FCC said consumer white lists could be based
    on a customer's own contacts list.

    Pai also proposed seeking public comment on how caller ID
    authentication standards, known as SHAKEN/STIR, can inform call
    blocking. He has demanded that carriers adopt these standards to
    combat malicious spoofing. This system of signing calls as legitimate
    as they pass through the phone networks may be useful for
    call-blocking tools, the FCC said.

    The May 15 action would mark the first by the FCC to directly combat
    robocalls that spoof legitimate, in-service numbers. This follows
    adoption of new rules in 2017, which allowed blocking of calls before
    they reach consumers when they are highly likely to be illegitimate.
    "These calls might appear to come from nonexistent area codes or from
    numbers on the Do Not Originate list that do not make outbound calls
    -- like the FCC's own consumer help line, which was added to the list
    following scam calls that spoofed the agency's 888-CALL-FCC number,"
    the Commission said.

    The FCC will consider these measures at its June 6 open meeting.

    So Now What? Podcast

    Due to the ARRL National Convention at Dayton Hamvention^(R)
    beginning on Thursday, May 16, there will be no new episode this week
    of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers. At
    Hamvention, the podcast team will doing some special guest interviews
    for an upcoming episode of the podcast. In addition, keep an eye on
    ARRL's social media feeds -- Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and
    Twitter -- for photos and video from Hamvention.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you
    have lots of questions. The biweekly So Now What? podcast has
    answers, offering insights from those who've been just where you are
    now. New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Sunspot activity continues, and
    this reporting week, the average daily sunspot number rose from 16.1
    to 22.7, while average daily solar flux went from 73.5 to 75.7. The
    two sunspot groups that appeared on May 3 and May 6 are fading fast
    and rotating off the visible solar disc. Two geomagnetically active
    days occurred on May 11 and 14, when the planetary A index reached 25
    and 36.

    Predicted solar flux is 72 on May 16 - 18; 70 on May 19; 68 on May 20
    - 22; 67 on May 23 - 29; 70, 72, 74, and 76 on May 30 - June 2; 77 on
    June 3 - 11; 75 on June 12; 72 on June 13 - 14; 70 on June 15; 69 on
    June 16 - 17; 68 on June 18; 67 on June 19 - 25, and 70, 72, 74, and
    76 on June 26 - 29.

    Predicted planetary A index is 28, 20, and 8 on May 16 - 18; 5 on May
    19 - 27; 10, 12, 8, and 10 on May 28 - 31; 5 on June 1 - 15; 8 on
    June 16; 5 on June 17 - 23; 10, 12, 8, and 10 on June 24 - 27, and 5
    on June 28 - 29.

    On May 10, Jeff, N8II, in West Virginia reported a sporadic-E opening
    on 10 meters. Also on May 10, Jon, N0JK, reported 6-meter sporadic-E
    openings from Kansas.

    Sunspot numbers for May 9 - 15 were 25, 24, 26, 24, 23, 24, and 13,
    with a mean of 22.7. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 76.2, 76.3, 78, 76,
    74.7, 74.4, and 74, with a mean of 75.7. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 7, 7, 25, 4, 6, 36, and 6, with a mean of 13. Middle
    latitude A index was 8, 7, 19, 5, 5, 23, and 8, with a mean of 10.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service web page, read "What the Numbers
    Mean...," and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * May 17 - 19 -- Portuguese Navy Day Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * May 18 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * May 18 -- UN DX Contest (DX, phone)
    * May 18 - 19 -- NZART Sangster Shield Contest (CW)
    * May 18 - 19 -- His Majesty the King of Spain Contest, CW
    * May 18 - 19 -- EU PSK DX Contest
    * May 18 - 19 -- Aegean RTTY Contest
    * May 18 - 19 -- Baltic Contest (CW, phone)
    * May 20 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * May 22 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * May 22 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (Digital)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Arizona Homeowners Association and Hams Agree on Outdoor Antenna
    Guidelines

    The Board of Directors of an antenna-restricted community in Arizona
    voted overwhelmingly in April to allow radio amateurs to erect
    certain outdoor antennas on their properties. Some 75 hams live in
    the 10,000-home Sun City Grand, a self-contained residential
    community for older adults in Surprise, Arizona. An article in the
    Grand Ham Newsletter by Gordon Bousman, NW7D, called it "a big win"
    and said the Sun City Grand community homeowners association (HOA) is
    believed to be the largest in the US to permit Amateur Radio
    antennas. The HOA board includes one radio amateur. The new antenna
    guidelines went into effect on May 9.

    "The road to success took nearly a year of meetings, negotiations,
    and occasional setbacks driven by a team of dedicated amateurs who
    were persistent in reaching our goals," Bousman said in his article.
    "While our initial discussion points focused on the possibility of
    passage of the [Amateur Radio] Parity Act, we later shifted our focus
    to the value that Amateur Radio operators can bring to the community
    in the event of an emergency or crisis."

    Bousman told ARRL the group "somewhat" modeled its antenna proposal
    after that of the Sun City Texas Ham Radio group in Georgetown,
    Texas, which permitted outdoor antennas several years ago.

    Gordon Bousman, NW7D.

    The types of antennas permitted are modest. The list includes
    flagpole antennas that do not exceed 16 feet, verticals that do not
    rise more than 5 feet above the peak of a home, and wire antennas no
    higher than 5 feet above the roof peak. No traps in wire antennas are
    allowed and towers of any type remain prohibited.

    "[These] antennas should provide amateurs very adequate capabilities
    to work long distances on the HF bands and to be able to adequately
    communicate across our community on the VHF/UHF bands -- as well as
    being able to reach most repeaters in the Phoenix area valley,
    including several emergency repeaters," the newsletter article
    stated.

    Radio amateurs will need to apply to the HOA's Architectural Review
    Committee Standards Office to obtain approval and may only erect two
    outdoor antennas.

    Bousman said more than a dozen antenna applications were submitted in
    the first week and other hams are working on designs. Read more.

    First Ham Satellite -- OSCAR 1 -- will Join AMSAT's 50th Anniversary
    Celebration at Dayton

    A working prototype of OSCAR 1, Amateur Radio's first satellite, will
    be on display at AMSAT's Dayton Hamvention^(R) booth. AMSAT's exhibit
    will be in Building 1 (Maxim Hall) at the Greene County Fairgrounds
    and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. OSCAR 1 (Orbiting Satellite Carrying
    Amateur Radio) was launched into orbit in 1961, at the dawn of the
    Space Age. Built by a group of California-based radio amateurs for
    about $60, OSCAR 1 was the first nongovernmental satellite. It
    transmitted a simple "HI" in CW for nearly 20 days and was heard in
    28 different countries. W1AW Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q,
    recently had to troubleshoot a problem with ARRL's OSCAR 1 in
    preparation for its Dayton appearance in a special "OSCAR Park"
    display commemorating AMSAT's 50th anniversary. He said it was a
    "rather humbling" experience.

    "Apparently, OSCAR 1 was not transmitting properly," Carcia said.
    "So, I took it back into the shop, changed the power cable, and
    checked the transmitter. I had to tweak it just a bit." Carcia said
    the satellite now functions.

    Only three OSCAR 1 satellites were made. One was launched into orbit,
    of course, while the Smithsonian Institution houses the other.
    "Assuming it doesn't get bounced around too much en route, it will be
    transmitting a chirpy 'HI' on 145.224 MHz," Carcia said. "The load is
    a 50 W resistor, so you can copy it about 50 feet or so away from the
    source."

    AMSAT will present Amateur Radio satellite operation demonstrations
    outside the main entrance of Maxim Hall, 8 AM - 4:30 PM, on all three
    days of Hamvention. "AMSAT will be demonstrating actual contacts with
    the operational amateur satellites," AMSAT said in its weekly AMSAT
    News Service newsletter. "We especially want to invite youth to make
    a contact via an amateur satellite. All are invited to observe,
    participate, and ask questions."

    AMSAT will hold its forum in Room 2 on Saturday, May 18, starting at
    12:10 PM EDT. AMSAT Vice President of User Services Robert Bankston,
    KE4AL, will moderate the session.
    ITU Working Party 5A1 Completes Draft New Report on WRC-19 Agenda
    Item 1.1

    Working Group 1 of ITU-R Working Party 5A completed work on the
    sharing and compatibility studies required for World
    Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) Agenda Item 1.1 during
    the meeting of WP 5A that concluded on May 9. The report, which began
    as a nine-page document in 2016, grew to 158 pages developed from 60
    input contributions over a 3-year period. Working Group 5A1,
    responsible for amateur matters, is chaired by Dale Hughes, VK1DSH.

    Agenda item 1.1 calls on the ITU to study Amateur Service spectrum
    needs in Region 1 in the 50 - 54 MHz band, taking into account the
    results of sharing studies between the Amateur Service and other
    services using the band to ensure protection of these services.

    The report describes work undertaken to prepare for Agenda Item 1.1
    of WRC-19 and the associated Conference Preparatory Meeting (CPM),
    which addressed the technical background for WRC. National
    administrations will use the Draft New Report and the CPM Report to
    prepare proposals for WRC-19 later this year. Region 1 Regional
    Telecommunications Organizations (RTOs) will hold preparatory
    meetings this summer to develop common multi-country proposals.
    WRC-19 will only consider proposals actually offered by
    administrations or RTOs.

    No impact on Amateur Radio allocations in Regions 2 and 3 is
    anticipated. WRC-19 takes place October 28 - November 22 in Sharm
    el-Sheikh, Egypt.

    Dayton Hamvention and ARISS Working Together Again this Year

    Dayton Hamvention^(R) will support the Amateur Radio on the
    International Space Station (ARISS) program this year by including
    the first-ever ARISS Forum, on Friday, May 17, from 1:15 - 2:15 PM in
    Room 3. Speakers will present current and future lifelong learning
    activities for hams and students via ARISS SSTV, APRS, voice
    repeaters, radio experiments, and robots.

    Attendees will also learn about the next-gen on-orbit hardware
    systems, updates on school activities, the ARISS initiative to fly
    ham radio on the human spaceflight lunar Gateway, how to maximize
    hams' opportunities to make ARISS connections and listen to the ISS
    crew in home stations, and meet special guests.

    Hamvention will boost ARISS by once again featuring a special
    ticket-drawing right before the Sunday bonus prize drawing. The
    winner will receive an ARISS Challenge Coin display. A challenge coin
    is the premium received by donors who give $100 or more to ARISS. The
    ARISS exhibit in Building 1 will display equipment that will replace
    and upgrade the ham station gear now on board. Hamvention visitors
    donating $10 will receive a new ARISS lapel pin and a chance to win
    an ARISS Challenge Coin, with the winning ticket to be drawn at the
    ARISS booth on Sunday morning. Online donations are also invited.
    In Brief...

    An Amateur Radio weather warning alerted residents of an Ohio town to
    a possible tornado. A handful of Ohio SKYWARN weather spotters on
    April 14 forwarded reports to National Weather Service (NWS)
    Cleveland of a possible tornado near Shelby. As a result, NWS
    Cleveland was able to issue a tornado warning before the storm struck
    the town. No lives were lost, but six were injured. The tornado was
    rated as an EF-2 storm, but it was on the ground for 17 miles and
    covered a swath of 1/2 mile. Immediately after receiving word of the
    strike, coordinating through the county emergency management agency
    (EMA), District Emergency Coordinator Danny Baily, W8DLB, and others
    headed immediately to Shelby, where they met with law enforcement.
    Because all of District 6 was activated, it was decided to activate
    two counties to the north and three counties to the south of
    Richland. DMR Ohio Talk Group 3139 was used to coordinate resources.
    While no telecommunications were knocked out of service, hams were
    assigned to walk the perimeter to keep an eye open for any problems.
    -- Thanks to Ohio Section Emergency Coordinator Stan Broadway, N8BHL,
    in DELARA News

    +++

    The ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference (DCC) has reissued a
    call for papers for its 2019 event. Technical papers are invited for
    presentation at the Conference, set for September 20 - 22 at the
    Marriott Detroit Metro Airport Hotel. Papers will also be published
    in the Conference Proceedings. Authors do not need to attend the
    conference to have their papers included in the Proceedings. The
    submission deadline is August 5. Submit papers via email or mail to
    Maty Weinberg, KB1EIB, ARRL, 225 Main St., Newington, CT 06111.
    Papers will be published exactly as submitted, and authors will
    retain all rights.

    +++

    The 2019 GNU Radio Conference (GRCon19), September 16 - 20 in
    Huntsville, Alabama, is seeking papers and presentations. Submissions
    are due by July 1. The GNU Radio Conference highlights the
    substantial and remarkable progress of the world's premier
    open-source digital signal processing framework for software-defined
    radios. In addition to presenting GNU Radio's theoretical and
    practical presence in academia, industry, the military, and among
    radio amateurs and hobbyists, GNU Radio Conference 2019 will have a
    special focus on the 50th anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 mission,
    which landed the first humans on the moon -- hence, the selection of
    "The Rocket City," home to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, as
    the venue. Papers for inclusion in the Technical Proceedings are
    welcome, but submitters do not need to submit papers to the
    Proceedings in order to present at GRCon19. For more information,
    visit the GRCon19 website.

    +++

    Amateur Radio Roundtable will Livestream 50 Hours of Dayton
    Hamvention^(R). Amateur Radio Roundtable and host Tom Medlin, W5KUB,
    will be back at Dayton Hamvention to livestream the activity and
    action before, during, and after the May 17 - 19 event. Amateur Radio
    Roundtable's show coverage will go live on Thursday, May 16, and
    continue through the weekend. "This is a big event and we have
    viewers in about 150 countries," Medlin said. "Astronaut Doug
    Wheelock, KF5BOC, will join us again for the 7th year as cohost. Join
    in the live chat room." More information is on the W5KUB Facebook
    group.

    +++

    Selected Sessions of the 2019 Contest University (CTU) will be
    Livestreamed, Compliments of Icom America. Streaming on the CTU
    website will begin on May 16 at 1200 UTC. Topics include Radiosport
    Contesting with Integrity; 2BSIQ & SO3R: Riding the Edge of Human
    Capabilities, and No-Compromise Remote Contesting.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Getting It Right!

    In "High-Altitude Celebration at SAQ," which appeared in the May 9
    edition of The ARRL Letter, we identified the wrong "B" composer.
    Ludwig van Beethoven composed "Ode to Joy."

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * May 17 - 19 -- Dayton Hamvention -- ARRL National Convention,
    Xenia, Ohio
    * May 31 - June 1 -- Arizona State Convention, Prescott, Arizona
    * May 31 - June 2 -- Northwestern Division Convention, Seaside,
    Oregon
    * June 1 -- Georgia Section Convention, Marietta, Georgia
    * June 1 - 2 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention, Prospect,
    Pennsylvania
    * June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention (Ham-Com), Plano,
    Texas
    * June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention, Owensville, Ohio
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur
    Radio's most popular and informative journal, delivered to your
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    * Listen to ARRL Audio News, available every Friday.

    Subscribe to...
    * NCJ -- National Contest Journal. Published bimonthly, features
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    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.



    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, May 24, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    May 23, 2019

    * Dayton Hamvention Attracts a Happy Crowd
    * Springtime Section Manager Election Results Announced
    * Magnetic Loop Antenna Designs Multiply
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * FCC Re-Charters Technological Advisory Council for New Term
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * June Event in Europe to Assess Activity, Ability to Share
    Spectrum on 6 Meters
    * CQ Announces 2019 Hall of Fame Inductees
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter will not publish on Thursday, May 30, and there will
    be no edition of ARRL Audio News on Friday, May 31. The ARRL Letter
    will return on June 6.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Dayton Hamvention Attracts a Happy Crowd

    Dayton Hamvention^(R), hosting the 2019 ARRL National Convention,
    chalked up its third year at its new venue, the Greene County
    Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. Amateur Radio's largest
    annual gathering took place May 17 - 19. Hamvention officials have
    not yet released a 2019 attendance figure, but last year's show drew
    28,417 -- the third largest attendance ever. For many hams,
    Hamvention offers an opportunity each spring to renew old
    acquaintances and make new ones, and for manufacturers to debut their
    latest and greatest gear.

    "These were some of the biggest crowds I've seen since Dayton
    Hamvention relocated to Xenia," ARRL Product Development Manager Bob
    Inderbitzen, NQ1R, said.

    Hamvention visitors enjoyed largely comfortable weather, with some
    drizzle on opening day. By all accounts, the crowd was animated and
    amiable. This year marked the first that Hamvention offered free
    Sunday admission.

    ARRL President Rick
    Roderick, K5UR.

    "Dayton Hamvention 2019 was a fantastic event and was a great setting
    for the ARRL National Convention," said ARRL President Rick Roderick,
    K5UR. "Thank you to everyone for stopping by the ARRL exhibit area to
    visit with ARRL officials, staff, and volunteers. It's always a
    pleasure to be able to have a face-to-face QSO with everyone. Isn't
    ham radio great? The greatest hobby in the world!"

    A free ARRL/Dayton Hamvention mobile event app helped visitors
    navigate the landscape of exhibitors and forums. Attendees also used
    the app to follow the hourly prize drawings, connect with other
    visitors, and view maps of the sprawling fairgrounds. The new app got
    a positive reception.

    Members of the Nashua (New
    Hampshire) Area Radio Society
    received the Dayton
    Hamvention^(R) Club of the
    Year Award. At ARRL's
    invitation, NARS hosted an
    interactive exhibit to serve
    as a model for other clubs to
    emulate. (L - R) Scott
    Andersen, NE1RD; Jamey
    Finchum, AC1DC; Fred Kemmerer,
    AB1OC; Brian McCaffrey, W1BP;
    Anita Kemmerer, AB1QB; Dave
    Merchant, K1DLM; Abby Finchum,
    AB1BY, and Charlie Dunn,
    W1CBD. [Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R,
    photo]

    The Nashua (New Hampshire) Area Radio Society (NARS) -- the 2019
    Dayton Hamvention Club of the Year -- led the "ARRL Spotlight on
    Radio Clubs and Mentoring" forum. NARS members described the ways the
    club builds and maintains a strong and active membership through its
    website, licensing classes, and programs that fit members' schedules.
    The success rate for licensing classes is 93%, and the club retains
    70% of active members. Instructors from the ARRL Education &
    Technology Program shared resources available for introducing radio
    science and wireless technology.

    In step with the shared ARRL Convention-Hamvention theme, "Mentoring
    the Next Generation," the 2019 Youth Forum moderated by Carole Perry,
    WB2MGP, drew attendees of all ages.

    ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX,
    addresses the ARRL Member Forum.
    [Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, photo]

    It was standing room only at Saturday's ARRL Member Forum, which
    featured a panel of ARRL Board members with ARRL Great Lakes Division
    Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, moderating. Pacific Division Director
    Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, who chairs the Legislative Advocacy Committee,
    addressed the Board's decision to hit the pause button on the Amateur
    Radio Parity Act. He said the Board intends to renew efforts to get a
    bill passed and will craft a new strategy to make that happen.

    Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH,
    discusses the new Volunteer
    Monitor Program. [Allison
    McLellan photo]

    President Roderick and CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, stressed the need
    to attract more Technician licensees into ARRL. Roderick challenged
    forum attendees to make sure their clubs are welcoming newcomers and
    helping them to get active and engaged as radio amateurs. At Michel's
    "Engaging Today's Radio Amateur" presentation, audience members
    expressed support for the new directions Michel is taking ARRL in
    terms of delivering more value to members.

    The Youngsters on the Air (YOTA)
    delegation (L - R); Florian
    Zwingl, OE3FTA; Larissa
    Rentmeister (SWL); Markus
    Grosser, DL8GM; Phillip Springer,
    DK6SP. YOTA is a project of IARU
    Region 1. [Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R,
    photo]

    Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, headed up a Sunday forum on ARRL's new
    Volunteer Monitor Program. Hollingsworth explained how the program
    evolved out of an FCC request. Hollingsworth explained that he polled
    FCC District Directors to see which areas of the US needed the most
    attention. He said that's where most Volunteer Monitors will be
    deployed.

    ARRL's Public Service Communications Panel Discussion drew a large
    crowd of Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) members and other
    active volunteers.

    Dayton Hamvention Radio
    Amateur of the Year
    Nathaniel Frissell,
    W2NAF (left), with Joe
    Taylor, K1JT, of WSJT-X
    renown. [Bob
    Inderbitzen, NQ1R,
    photo]

    Audience members expressed constructive concerns over the new ARES
    Plan and with reinforcing Amateur Radio recognition nationwide.

    "ARRL's big team included 118 members supporting exhibits,
    activities, and presentations to help all radio amateurs become more
    active, involved, and engaged," Inderbitzen said. "Together we helped
    represent the very best of our Amateur Radio Service and ARRL."

    At a Thursday Donors' Reception, President Roderick presented the
    National Convention recognition award to Hamvention Chairman Jack
    Gerbs, WB8SCT, and Dayton Amateur Radio Association (DARA) President
    (and past Hamvention General Chair) Ron Cramer, KD8ENJ.

    +++
    Springtime Section Manager Election Results Announced

    In the only contested Section Manager election this spring, ARRL
    members in Utah have re-elected Mel Parkes, NM7P, as Section Manager
    for a new 2-year term of office that starts on July 1. Parkes, of
    Layton, received 481 votes; his opponent, Pat Malan, N7PAT, of South
    Jordan, received 233 votes. Parkes has served as Section Manager
    since 1999. Ballots were counted and verified at ARRL Headquarters on
    May 21.

    Elsewhere, John Gotthardt, K1UAF, of Wolfeboro, will become Section
    Manager of New Hampshire on July 1. He was the only nominee for the
    post after New Hampshire Section Manager Pete Stohrer, K1PJS, of
    Concord, decided not to run for a new term after serving since 2013.
    Gotthardt is currently the Section Traffic Manager and also serves as
    Net Manager and Official Relay Station.

    Steve Ostrove, K2SO, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, will become the
    Northern New Jersey Section Manager once again in July. Ostrove
    previously served as Section Manager from 2016 until 2017. Northern
    New Jersey SM Rob Roschewsk, KA2PBT, decided not to run for a new
    term after serving for the past 2 years.

    Several incumbent Section Managers faced no opposition and were
    declared re-elected to new terms starting on July 1: Marty Pittinger,
    KB3MXM (Maryland-DC); John Bigley, N7UR (Nevada); Bob Beaudet, W1YRC
    (Rhode Island); Dan Pruitt, AE6SX (San Joaquin Valley), and Dale
    Durham, W5WI (West Texas).

    +++

    Magnetic Loop Antenna Designs Multiply

    Magnetic loops have become popular as effective and compact antennas
    for traveling and stealth applications. An HF magnetic loop design by
    John Chappell, W3HX, was an honorable mention in the 2018 QST Antenna
    Design Competition. Chappell's mag loop offers coverage on 80 - 20
    meters, and he runs FT8 at 50 W. See his article on page 39 of the
    June 2019 issue of QST.

    The magnetic loop for 40 and 20
    meters designed by Richard Robbins,
    WA8RR. [Photo courtesy of DELARA
    News]

    Richard Robbins, WA8RR, wanted to build one of his own for 40 and 20
    meters, and he described his efforts in a recent edition of his
    club's newsletter, DELARA News. An online calculator helped him come
    up with the basics, and he decided on a 10-foot circumference loop
    constructed from half-inch copper pipe that would handle 100 W. His
    prototype, constructed from a piece of pipe "hand bent into an
    approximate circle," a Dayton Hamvention flea market capacitor, and a
    coax drive loop, would tune the two bands -- although, as expected,
    tuning was very sensitive and affected by body capacitance.

    He worked up a reduction drive and remote motorized tuning, and was
    able to make several FT8 contacts, using his antenna analyzer to tune
    the loop. "The tuning would shift as I was transmitting," Robbins
    recounted. "This is a result of a very high circulating current and
    heating of the separate components." Encouraged, he went for a
    higher-end design constructed around a 5 - 500 pf vacuum variable
    capacitor, the project's most expensive component (these go for $150
    or more on eBay). "It is big and heavy," Robbins said. He had a metal
    fabricator bend a new piece of thin-wall copper tubing into a more
    aesthetically pleasing circle.

    "To drive the capacitor, I obtained a stepper motor and driver, an
    Arduino controller board, and a four-channel remote," Robbins
    explained. "I used some sample programs to develop the code that
    would move the capacitor at different speeds depending on how long
    the remote was pressed. I added markings on the capacitor, so I could
    quickly move to different bands." -- Thanks to DELARA News
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Do Dipoles Have to be Straight?" is the topic of the current (May 9)
    episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet,
    or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to
    doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone
    or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can
    also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration
    required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free
    Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never
    listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.

    FCC Re-Charters Technological Advisory Council for New Term

    The FCC has re-chartered its Technological Advisory Council (TAC) for
    a 2-year term. Comprised of a diverse group of leading technology
    experts, the TAC provides technical expertise to the FCC to identify
    important areas of innovation and develop informed technology
    policies.

    Greg Lapin, N9GL, will continue to represent ARRL on the TAC.

    "The TAC will consider and advise the Commission on a variety of
    topics such as the deployment of 5G technology, the evolution of
    broadband networks and devices and their implications, the spectrum
    needs of unmanned aircraft systems, new developments in antenna
    technology, and the applications of artificial intelligence to
    telecommunications networks," the FCC said in announcing the
    re-charter.

    Dennis Roberson, Executive Chairman of entigenlogicTM, chairs the
    Council. Michael Ha, Deputy Chief of the FCC Policy and Rules
    Division, is the Designated Federal Officer.

    The TAC will next meet on June 21. The public is welcome. The FCC
    Public Notice includes the names of all TAC members, some of whom are
    radio amateurs. -- FCC Public Notice
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: May 18 was the last day we saw
    sunspot activity, after more than 2 weeks with sunspots visible
    daily. The average daily sunspot number declined to 5.3 this week
    from 22.7 the previous week. Average daily solar flux declined from
    75.7 to 69.8. Geomagnetic conditions were quieter, with the average
    daily planetary A index declining from 13 to 5.

    Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 68 on May 23 - 27; 70
    on May 28 - 30; 72 on May 31; 74 on June 1; 76 on June 2 - 10; 74 on
    June 11; 72 on June 12 - 13; 70 on June 14 - 15; 69 on June 16 - 17;
    68 on June 18; 67 on June 19 - 25; 70, 72, and 74 on June 26 - 28,
    and 76 on June 29 - July 6.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on May 23 - 24; 8 on May 25; 5 on
    May 26 - 27; 10; 8; 8 and 10 on May 28 - 31; 5 on June 1 - 15; 8 on
    June 16 - 18; 5 on June 19 - 23; 10, 12, 8, and 10 on June 24 - 27,
    and 5 on June 28 - July 6.

    On May 20, Markus Hansen, VE7CA, wrote to say he's been hearing many
    10-meter beacons from California, and one from Utah.

    Sunspot numbers for May 16 - 22 were 13, 13, 11, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 5.3. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 73.6, 72.1, 70.6, 68,
    68.7, 68, and 67.3, with a mean of 69.8. Estimated planetary A index
    was8, 5, 5, 3, 6, 4, and 4, with a mean of 5. The mid-latitude A
    index was 9, 7, 8, 3, 7, 4, and 5, with a mean of 6.1.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * May 25 - 26 -- CQ World Wide WPX Contest, CW
    * May 30 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, CW
    * June 1 -- Wake-Up! QRP Sprint (CW)
    * June 1 - 2 -- SEANET Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 1 - 2 -- 10-10 International Open Season PSK Contest
    * June 1 - 2 -- DigiFest
    * June 1 - 2 -- UKSMG Summer Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 1 - 2 -- Kentucky QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 1 - 2 -- IARU Region 1 Field Day (CW)
    * June 1 - 2 -- Dutch Kingdom Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 1 - 2 -- RSGB National Field Day (CW)
    * June 2 -- PVRC Reunion (CW, phone)
    * June 4 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * June 6 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 6 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    June Event in Europe to Assess Activity, Ability to Share Spectrum on
    6 Meters

    The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) has thrown its support
    behind an upcoming operating event on 6 meters aimed at assessing
    activity on 6 meters and the ability of Amateur Radio to share
    spectrum with government users on the band. The worldwide Amateur
    Radio community is invited to participate in the Czech-sponsored
    Pohotovostní (readiness) Test -- or "P-Test" -- which will take place
    on June 13. Agenda Item 1.1 for World Radiocommunication Conference
    2019 (WRC-19) will consider an Amateur Service allocation in the 50 -
    54 MHz band in Region 1 (Europe, Africa, Asiatic Russia), taking into
    account studies looking into sharing between the Amateur Service and
    the mobile, fixed, radiolocation, and broadcasting services, "in
    order to ensure protection of these services."

    The Czech Republic's telecommunications regulator CTO is
    investigating if theoretical study results match real life. The June
    test follows an initial trial that took place in late February in the
    Czech Republic. One objective was to verify that military and Amateur
    Radio stations could coexist on the band. The second test will take
    place when enhanced propagation is more likely. During the event,
    other 50 MHz band users will operate their own communication systems,
    and the IARU has cautioned radio amateurs not to interfere with their
    activities.

    "The purpose of this event is to show regulators that amateurs and
    military stations can coexist without causing harmful interference to
    each other," said an IARU Region 1 news article by Hans Blondeel
    Timmerman, PB2T.

    The June 13 event will take place in two activity periods: The first
    will run from 0730 until 0900 UTC, and the second will take place
    from 1100 to 1230 UTC. Participating stations will call "CQ P
    (Contest)" and exchange signal reports, a sequential serial number, a
    six-character grid locator, and a geographical location.

    Maximum power output will be 25 W PEP, the maximum power under Czech
    Amateur Radio Service regulations. Stations outside of the Czech
    Republic are requested to use the same output power to enable
    comparisons with the February test. The use of spotting networks is
    permitted. Submit logs no later than 1230 UTC on June 15.

    "We would like to involve amateur stations experimenting with
    wideband modes in this test," the IARU news article said. This could
    include reduced-bandwidth digital television or other wide-band
    emissions. Such stations would participate in the second activity
    period. Read more.

    CQ Announces 2019 Hall of Fame Inductees

    CQ Magazine over the weekend announced the 2019 inductees to its
    Amateur Radio, DX, and Contest halls of fame.

    The CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame added 5 new members for 2019,
    making a total of 326 inductees since its establishment in 2001. The
    CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame honors radio amateurs who have made
    significant contributions "to Amateur Radio, to their professional
    careers or to some other aspect of life on our planet." The 2019
    inductees are:

    John Attaway, Sr., K4IIF (SK); Dave Bernstein, AA6YQ; Doreen
    Bogdan-Martin, KD2JTX; Predescu Florin Cristian, YO0CNU, and Ellen
    White, W1YL.

    CQ inducted two new members to its CQ DX Hall of Fame, which honors
    those DXers who not only excel in personal performance, but also give
    back to the hobby in outstanding ways. CQ DX Editor Bob Schenck,
    N2OO, presented Hall of Fame plaques at an induction ceremony held at
    the annual Dayton DX dinner on May 17.

    The 2019 inductees to the CQ DX Hall of Fame are: Joe Taylor, K1JT,
    and Silvano Borsa, I2YSB, and the Italian DXpedition Team.

    The CQ DX Hall of Fame was established in 1967 to recognize those
    amateurs who have made major contributions to DXing and
    DXpeditioning. This weekend marked the 54th ^ annual induction.

    CQ magazine inducted three new members into the CQ Contest Hall of
    Fame, which honors contesters who stand out in their own contesting
    performance while also contributing greatly to the avocation as a
    whole. CQ Contesting Editor David Siddall, K3ZJ, presented Hall of
    Fame plaques at an induction ceremony held at the annual Dayton
    Contest Dinner on May 18.

    The 2019 inductees to the CQ Contest Hall of Fame are: Bruce Horn,
    WA7BNM, and Dean Straw, N6BV, and Kresimir "Chris" Kovarik, 9A5K
    (SK).

    The CQ Contest Hall of Fame was established in 1986 to recognize
    those amateurs who have made major contributions to the art of radio
    contesting. This year's inductions bring the total number of members
    of the CQ Contest Hall of Fame to 74. Read more.
    In Brief...

    Educator, author, and contester Fred Cady, KE7X, of Bozeman, Montana,
    died on May 16. An ARRL Life Member, he turned 77 earlier this month.
    Cady was a professor emeritus of electrical and computer engineering
    at Montana State University. He coauthored The Successful Ham Radio
    Operator's Handbook with Vic DiCiccio, VE3YT. He also wrote several
    manuals on how to use Elecraft equipment. First licensed in 1959,
    Cady earned a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of
    Canterbury in New Zealand, and was a senior member of the Institute
    of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He taught for more
    than 40 years and published five textbooks on microcomputers. An avid
    CW contester, Cady was a member of the world record-holding Team
    Vertical contest group. "Fred was my very dear friend and an
    important mentor for me," DiCiccio said. "Working with him to write
    The Successful Ham book was a joy. He helped so many people as a
    professor, author of his books, and in his role as a volunteer
    fireman, fire chief, and deputy chief. He will be deeply missed."

    +++

    Radio Amateurs in India recently provided post-disaster
    communication. According to a May 12 article in The Hindu newspaper,
    after Cyclone Fani struck eastern India on May 3, two teams of
    Amateur Radio operators from Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal came to
    the rescue. The town of Puri in the state of Odisha remained cut off
    for 2 days, and VHF communication systems used by police had very
    limited range. The Odisha state control room was not able to
    establish regular communication with district headquarters,
    "resulting in utter confusion in relief and rescue operations," the
    newspaper said. Emergency managers now are looking into how and why
    post-disaster communication failed for the first time since 1999. In
    the wake of Cyclone Fani, ham radio provided the primary mode of
    communication for the first several hours.

    +++

    IARU Member-Societies have ratified leadership nominations and will
    consider new members International Amateur Radio Union (IARU)
    member-societies on May 3 completed voting to ratify the nominations
    of IARU President Tim Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA, and Vice President Ole
    Garpestad, LA2RR, to new terms. With 57 affirmative votes required
    for ratification, Ellam received 75 votes, and Garpestad received 74
    votes. Applications for IARU membership have been received via IARU
    Region 1 from the Saudi Amateur Radio Society (SARS) and the
    Seychelles Amateur Radio Association (SARA). As of January 2019,
    there were 66 members out of a total of 479 licensed radio amateurs
    in Saudi Arabia. SARA has six members, two of whom are licensed. It
    is believed that there are four licensed amateurs in Seychelles.
    Voting will close on October 9.

    +++

    The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) has announced a Cricket
    World Cup Amateur Radio Marathon, from May 30 until July 14. The
    Cricket World Cup will take place in England and Wales. UK and
    international call signs will be active on nine HF bands on SSB, CW,
    and digital modes. Award certificates will be offered based on the
    number of contacts made with the special UK and international
    stations. Sponsors are inviting other countries to take part and to
    activate special call signs with the suffix "19CWC" or similar. A
    total of 31 special call signs will be on the air in the UK, with
    GB19CWC representing the 2019 Cricket World Cup Headquarters in
    England. Listen for other "GB19" prefix call signs. Teams will field
    special event stations as well. Details, including the rules for
    awards and a list of international call signs, are on the RSGB
    website. Follow your progress on the Ham Log website. Email for more
    information on the marathon. -- Thanks to Nick Totterdell, G4FAL

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * May 31 - June 1 -- Arizona State Convention, Prescott, Arizona
    * May 31 - June 2 -- Northwestern Division Convention, Seaside,
    Oregon
    * June 1 -- Georgia Section Convention, Marietta, Georgia
    * June 1 - 2 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention, Prospect,
    Pennsylvania
    * June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention (Ham-Com), Plano,
    Texas
    * June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention, Owensville, Ohio
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, May 31, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    May 23, 2019

    * Dayton Hamvention Attracts a Happy Crowd
    * Springtime Section Manager Election Results Announced
    * Magnetic Loop Antenna Designs Multiply
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * FCC Re-Charters Technological Advisory Council for New Term
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * June Event in Europe to Assess Activity, Ability to Share
    Spectrum on 6 Meters
    * CQ Announces 2019 Hall of Fame Inductees
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter will not publish on Thursday, May 30, and there will
    be no edition of ARRL Audio News on Friday, May 31. The ARRL Letter
    will return on June 6.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Dayton Hamvention Attracts a Happy Crowd

    Dayton Hamvention^(R), hosting the 2019 ARRL National Convention,
    chalked up its third year at its new venue, the Greene County
    Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. Amateur Radio's largest
    annual gathering took place May 17 - 19. Hamvention officials have
    not yet released a 2019 attendance figure, but last year's show drew
    28,417 -- the third largest attendance ever. For many hams,
    Hamvention offers an opportunity each spring to renew old
    acquaintances and make new ones, and for manufacturers to debut their
    latest and greatest gear.

    "These were some of the biggest crowds I've seen since Dayton
    Hamvention relocated to Xenia," ARRL Product Development Manager Bob
    Inderbitzen, NQ1R, said.

    Hamvention visitors enjoyed largely comfortable weather, with some
    drizzle on opening day. By all accounts, the crowd was animated and
    amiable. This year marked the first that Hamvention offered free
    Sunday admission.

    ARRL President Rick
    Roderick, K5UR.

    "Dayton Hamvention 2019 was a fantastic event and was a great setting
    for the ARRL National Convention," said ARRL President Rick Roderick,
    K5UR. "Thank you to everyone for stopping by the ARRL exhibit area to
    visit with ARRL officials, staff, and volunteers. It's always a
    pleasure to be able to have a face-to-face QSO with everyone. Isn't
    ham radio great? The greatest hobby in the world!"

    A free ARRL/Dayton Hamvention mobile event app helped visitors
    navigate the landscape of exhibitors and forums. Attendees also used
    the app to follow the hourly prize drawings, connect with other
    visitors, and view maps of the sprawling fairgrounds. The new app got
    a positive reception.

    Members of the Nashua (New
    Hampshire) Area Radio Society
    received the Dayton
    Hamvention^(R) Club of the
    Year Award. At ARRL's
    invitation, NARS hosted an
    interactive exhibit to serve
    as a model for other clubs to
    emulate. (L - R) Scott
    Andersen, NE1RD; Jamey
    Finchum, AC1DC; Fred Kemmerer,
    AB1OC; Brian McCaffrey, W1BP;
    Anita Kemmerer, AB1QB; Dave
    Merchant, K1DLM; Abby Finchum,
    AB1BY, and Charlie Dunn,
    W1CBD. [Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R,
    photo]

    The Nashua (New Hampshire) Area Radio Society (NARS) -- the 2019
    Dayton Hamvention Club of the Year -- led the "ARRL Spotlight on
    Radio Clubs and Mentoring" forum. NARS members described the ways the
    club builds and maintains a strong and active membership through its
    website, licensing classes, and programs that fit members' schedules.
    The success rate for licensing classes is 93%, and the club retains
    70% of active members. Instructors from the ARRL Education &
    Technology Program shared resources available for introducing radio
    science and wireless technology.

    In step with the shared ARRL Convention-Hamvention theme, "Mentoring
    the Next Generation," the 2019 Youth Forum moderated by Carole Perry,
    WB2MGP, drew attendees of all ages.

    ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX,
    addresses the ARRL Member Forum.
    [Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, photo]

    It was standing room only at Saturday's ARRL Member Forum, which
    featured a panel of ARRL Board members with ARRL Great Lakes Division
    Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, moderating. Pacific Division Director
    Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, who chairs the Legislative Advocacy Committee,
    addressed the Board's decision to hit the pause button on the Amateur
    Radio Parity Act. He said the Board intends to renew efforts to get a
    bill passed and will craft a new strategy to make that happen.

    Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH,
    discusses the new Volunteer
    Monitor Program. [Allison
    McLellan photo]

    President Roderick and CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, stressed the need
    to attract more Technician licensees into ARRL. Roderick challenged
    forum attendees to make sure their clubs are welcoming newcomers and
    helping them to get active and engaged as radio amateurs. At Michel's
    "Engaging Today's Radio Amateur" presentation, audience members
    expressed support for the new directions Michel is taking ARRL in
    terms of delivering more value to members.

    The Youngsters on the Air (YOTA)
    delegation (L - R); Florian
    Zwingl, OE3FTA; Larissa
    Rentmeister (SWL); Markus
    Grosser, DL8GM; Phillip Springer,
    DK6SP. YOTA is a project of IARU
    Region 1. [Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R,
    photo]

    Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, headed up a Sunday forum on ARRL's new
    Volunteer Monitor Program. Hollingsworth explained how the program
    evolved out of an FCC request. Hollingsworth explained that he polled
    FCC District Directors to see which areas of the US needed the most
    attention. He said that's where most Volunteer Monitors will be
    deployed.

    ARRL's Public Service Communications Panel Discussion drew a large
    crowd of Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) members and other
    active volunteers.

    Dayton Hamvention Radio
    Amateur of the Year
    Nathaniel Frissell,
    W2NAF (left), with Joe
    Taylor, K1JT, of WSJT-X
    renown. [Bob
    Inderbitzen, NQ1R,
    photo]

    Audience members expressed constructive concerns over the new ARES
    Plan and with reinforcing Amateur Radio recognition nationwide.

    "ARRL's big team included 118 members supporting exhibits,
    activities, and presentations to help all radio amateurs become more
    active, involved, and engaged," Inderbitzen said. "Together we helped
    represent the very best of our Amateur Radio Service and ARRL."

    At a Thursday Donors' Reception, President Roderick presented the
    National Convention recognition award to Hamvention Chairman Jack
    Gerbs, WB8SCT, and Dayton Amateur Radio Association (DARA) President
    (and past Hamvention General Chair) Ron Cramer, KD8ENJ.

    +++
    Springtime Section Manager Election Results Announced

    In the only contested Section Manager election this spring, ARRL
    members in Utah have re-elected Mel Parkes, NM7P, as Section Manager
    for a new 2-year term of office that starts on July 1. Parkes, of
    Layton, received 481 votes; his opponent, Pat Malan, N7PAT, of South
    Jordan, received 233 votes. Parkes has served as Section Manager
    since 1999. Ballots were counted and verified at ARRL Headquarters on
    May 21.

    Elsewhere, John Gotthardt, K1UAF, of Wolfeboro, will become Section
    Manager of New Hampshire on July 1. He was the only nominee for the
    post after New Hampshire Section Manager Pete Stohrer, K1PJS, of
    Concord, decided not to run for a new term after serving since 2013.
    Gotthardt is currently the Section Traffic Manager and also serves as
    Net Manager and Official Relay Station.

    Steve Ostrove, K2SO, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, will become the
    Northern New Jersey Section Manager once again in July. Ostrove
    previously served as Section Manager from 2016 until 2017. Northern
    New Jersey SM Rob Roschewsk, KA2PBT, decided not to run for a new
    term after serving for the past 2 years.

    Several incumbent Section Managers faced no opposition and were
    declared re-elected to new terms starting on July 1: Marty Pittinger,
    KB3MXM (Maryland-DC); John Bigley, N7UR (Nevada); Bob Beaudet, W1YRC
    (Rhode Island); Dan Pruitt, AE6SX (San Joaquin Valley), and Dale
    Durham, W5WI (West Texas).

    +++

    Magnetic Loop Antenna Designs Multiply

    Magnetic loops have become popular as effective and compact antennas
    for traveling and stealth applications. An HF magnetic loop design by
    John Chappell, W3HX, was an honorable mention in the 2018 QST Antenna
    Design Competition. Chappell's mag loop offers coverage on 80 - 20
    meters, and he runs FT8 at 50 W. See his article on page 39 of the
    June 2019 issue of QST.

    The magnetic loop for 40 and 20
    meters designed by Richard Robbins,
    WA8RR. [Photo courtesy of DELARA
    News]

    Richard Robbins, WA8RR, wanted to build one of his own for 40 and 20
    meters, and he described his efforts in a recent edition of his
    club's newsletter, DELARA News. An online calculator helped him come
    up with the basics, and he decided on a 10-foot circumference loop
    constructed from half-inch copper pipe that would handle 100 W. His
    prototype, constructed from a piece of pipe "hand bent into an
    approximate circle," a Dayton Hamvention flea market capacitor, and a
    coax drive loop, would tune the two bands -- although, as expected,
    tuning was very sensitive and affected by body capacitance.

    He worked up a reduction drive and remote motorized tuning, and was
    able to make several FT8 contacts, using his antenna analyzer to tune
    the loop. "The tuning would shift as I was transmitting," Robbins
    recounted. "This is a result of a very high circulating current and
    heating of the separate components." Encouraged, he went for a
    higher-end design constructed around a 5 - 500 pf vacuum variable
    capacitor, the project's most expensive component (these go for $150
    or more on eBay). "It is big and heavy," Robbins said. He had a metal
    fabricator bend a new piece of thin-wall copper tubing into a more
    aesthetically pleasing circle.

    "To drive the capacitor, I obtained a stepper motor and driver, an
    Arduino controller board, and a four-channel remote," Robbins
    explained. "I used some sample programs to develop the code that
    would move the capacitor at different speeds depending on how long
    the remote was pressed. I added markings on the capacitor, so I could
    quickly move to different bands." -- Thanks to DELARA News
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Do Dipoles Have to be Straight?" is the topic of the current (May 9)
    episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet,
    or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to
    doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone
    or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can
    also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration
    required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free
    Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never
    listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.

    FCC Re-Charters Technological Advisory Council for New Term

    The FCC has re-chartered its Technological Advisory Council (TAC) for
    a 2-year term. Comprised of a diverse group of leading technology
    experts, the TAC provides technical expertise to the FCC to identify
    important areas of innovation and develop informed technology
    policies.

    Greg Lapin, N9GL, will continue to represent ARRL on the TAC.

    "The TAC will consider and advise the Commission on a variety of
    topics such as the deployment of 5G technology, the evolution of
    broadband networks and devices and their implications, the spectrum
    needs of unmanned aircraft systems, new developments in antenna
    technology, and the applications of artificial intelligence to
    telecommunications networks," the FCC said in announcing the
    re-charter.

    Dennis Roberson, Executive Chairman of entigenlogicTM, chairs the
    Council. Michael Ha, Deputy Chief of the FCC Policy and Rules
    Division, is the Designated Federal Officer.

    The TAC will next meet on June 21. The public is welcome. The FCC
    Public Notice includes the names of all TAC members, some of whom are
    radio amateurs. -- FCC Public Notice
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: May 18 was the last day we saw
    sunspot activity, after more than 2 weeks with sunspots visible
    daily. The average daily sunspot number declined to 5.3 this week
    from 22.7 the previous week. Average daily solar flux declined from
    75.7 to 69.8. Geomagnetic conditions were quieter, with the average
    daily planetary A index declining from 13 to 5.

    Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 68 on May 23 - 27; 70
    on May 28 - 30; 72 on May 31; 74 on June 1; 76 on June 2 - 10; 74 on
    June 11; 72 on June 12 - 13; 70 on June 14 - 15; 69 on June 16 - 17;
    68 on June 18; 67 on June 19 - 25; 70, 72, and 74 on June 26 - 28,
    and 76 on June 29 - July 6.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on May 23 - 24; 8 on May 25; 5 on
    May 26 - 27; 10; 8; 8 and 10 on May 28 - 31; 5 on June 1 - 15; 8 on
    June 16 - 18; 5 on June 19 - 23; 10, 12, 8, and 10 on June 24 - 27,
    and 5 on June 28 - July 6.

    On May 20, Markus Hansen, VE7CA, wrote to say he's been hearing many
    10-meter beacons from California, and one from Utah.

    Sunspot numbers for May 16 - 22 were 13, 13, 11, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 5.3. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 73.6, 72.1, 70.6, 68,
    68.7, 68, and 67.3, with a mean of 69.8. Estimated planetary A index
    was8, 5, 5, 3, 6, 4, and 4, with a mean of 5. The mid-latitude A
    index was 9, 7, 8, 3, 7, 4, and 5, with a mean of 6.1.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * May 25 - 26 -- CQ World Wide WPX Contest, CW
    * May 30 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, CW
    * June 1 -- Wake-Up! QRP Sprint (CW)
    * June 1 - 2 -- SEANET Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 1 - 2 -- 10-10 International Open Season PSK Contest
    * June 1 - 2 -- DigiFest
    * June 1 - 2 -- UKSMG Summer Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 1 - 2 -- Kentucky QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 1 - 2 -- IARU Region 1 Field Day (CW)
    * June 1 - 2 -- Dutch Kingdom Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 1 - 2 -- RSGB National Field Day (CW)
    * June 2 -- PVRC Reunion (CW, phone)
    * June 4 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * June 6 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 6 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    June Event in Europe to Assess Activity, Ability to Share Spectrum on
    6 Meters

    The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) has thrown its support
    behind an upcoming operating event on 6 meters aimed at assessing
    activity on 6 meters and the ability of Amateur Radio to share
    spectrum with government users on the band. The worldwide Amateur
    Radio community is invited to participate in the Czech-sponsored
    Pohotovostní (readiness) Test -- or "P-Test" -- which will take place
    on June 13. Agenda Item 1.1 for World Radiocommunication Conference
    2019 (WRC-19) will consider an Amateur Service allocation in the 50 -
    54 MHz band in Region 1 (Europe, Africa, Asiatic Russia), taking into
    account studies looking into sharing between the Amateur Service and
    the mobile, fixed, radiolocation, and broadcasting services, "in
    order to ensure protection of these services."

    The Czech Republic's telecommunications regulator CTO is
    investigating if theoretical study results match real life. The June
    test follows an initial trial that took place in late February in the
    Czech Republic. One objective was to verify that military and Amateur
    Radio stations could coexist on the band. The second test will take
    place when enhanced propagation is more likely. During the event,
    other 50 MHz band users will operate their own communication systems,
    and the IARU has cautioned radio amateurs not to interfere with their
    activities.

    "The purpose of this event is to show regulators that amateurs and
    military stations can coexist without causing harmful interference to
    each other," said an IARU Region 1 news article by Hans Blondeel
    Timmerman, PB2T.

    The June 13 event will take place in two activity periods: The first
    will run from 0730 until 0900 UTC, and the second will take place
    from 1100 to 1230 UTC. Participating stations will call "CQ P
    (Contest)" and exchange signal reports, a sequential serial number, a
    six-character grid locator, and a geographical location.

    Maximum power output will be 25 W PEP, the maximum power under Czech
    Amateur Radio Service regulations. Stations outside of the Czech
    Republic are requested to use the same output power to enable
    comparisons with the February test. The use of spotting networks is
    permitted. Submit logs no later than 1230 UTC on June 15.

    "We would like to involve amateur stations experimenting with
    wideband modes in this test," the IARU news article said. This could
    include reduced-bandwidth digital television or other wide-band
    emissions. Such stations would participate in the second activity
    period. Read more.

    CQ Announces 2019 Hall of Fame Inductees

    CQ Magazine over the weekend announced the 2019 inductees to its
    Amateur Radio, DX, and Contest halls of fame.

    The CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame added 5 new members for 2019,
    making a total of 326 inductees since its establishment in 2001. The
    CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame honors radio amateurs who have made
    significant contributions "to Amateur Radio, to their professional
    careers or to some other aspect of life on our planet." The 2019
    inductees are:

    John Attaway, Sr., K4IIF (SK); Dave Bernstein, AA6YQ; Doreen
    Bogdan-Martin, KD2JTX; Predescu Florin Cristian, YO0CNU, and Ellen
    White, W1YL.

    CQ inducted two new members to its CQ DX Hall of Fame, which honors
    those DXers who not only excel in personal performance, but also give
    back to the hobby in outstanding ways. CQ DX Editor Bob Schenck,
    N2OO, presented Hall of Fame plaques at an induction ceremony held at
    the annual Dayton DX dinner on May 17.

    The 2019 inductees to the CQ DX Hall of Fame are: Joe Taylor, K1JT,
    and Silvano Borsa, I2YSB, and the Italian DXpedition Team.

    The CQ DX Hall of Fame was established in 1967 to recognize those
    amateurs who have made major contributions to DXing and
    DXpeditioning. This weekend marked the 54th ^ annual induction.

    CQ magazine inducted three new members into the CQ Contest Hall of
    Fame, which honors contesters who stand out in their own contesting
    performance while also contributing greatly to the avocation as a
    whole. CQ Contesting Editor David Siddall, K3ZJ, presented Hall of
    Fame plaques at an induction ceremony held at the annual Dayton
    Contest Dinner on May 18.

    The 2019 inductees to the CQ Contest Hall of Fame are: Bruce Horn,
    WA7BNM, and Dean Straw, N6BV, and Kresimir "Chris" Kovarik, 9A5K
    (SK).

    The CQ Contest Hall of Fame was established in 1986 to recognize
    those amateurs who have made major contributions to the art of radio
    contesting. This year's inductions bring the total number of members
    of the CQ Contest Hall of Fame to 74. Read more.
    In Brief...

    Educator, author, and contester Fred Cady, KE7X, of Bozeman, Montana,
    died on May 16. An ARRL Life Member, he turned 77 earlier this month.
    Cady was a professor emeritus of electrical and computer engineering
    at Montana State University. He coauthored The Successful Ham Radio
    Operator's Handbook with Vic DiCiccio, VE3YT. He also wrote several
    manuals on how to use Elecraft equipment. First licensed in 1959,
    Cady earned a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of
    Canterbury in New Zealand, and was a senior member of the Institute
    of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He taught for more
    than 40 years and published five textbooks on microcomputers. An avid
    CW contester, Cady was a member of the world record-holding Team
    Vertical contest group. "Fred was my very dear friend and an
    important mentor for me," DiCiccio said. "Working with him to write
    The Successful Ham book was a joy. He helped so many people as a
    professor, author of his books, and in his role as a volunteer
    fireman, fire chief, and deputy chief. He will be deeply missed."

    +++

    Radio Amateurs in India recently provided post-disaster
    communication. According to a May 12 article in The Hindu newspaper,
    after Cyclone Fani struck eastern India on May 3, two teams of
    Amateur Radio operators from Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal came to
    the rescue. The town of Puri in the state of Odisha remained cut off
    for 2 days, and VHF communication systems used by police had very
    limited range. The Odisha state control room was not able to
    establish regular communication with district headquarters,
    "resulting in utter confusion in relief and rescue operations," the
    newspaper said. Emergency managers now are looking into how and why
    post-disaster communication failed for the first time since 1999. In
    the wake of Cyclone Fani, ham radio provided the primary mode of
    communication for the first several hours.

    +++

    IARU Member-Societies have ratified leadership nominations and will
    consider new members International Amateur Radio Union (IARU)
    member-societies on May 3 completed voting to ratify the nominations
    of IARU President Tim Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA, and Vice President Ole
    Garpestad, LA2RR, to new terms. With 57 affirmative votes required
    for ratification, Ellam received 75 votes, and Garpestad received 74
    votes. Applications for IARU membership have been received via IARU
    Region 1 from the Saudi Amateur Radio Society (SARS) and the
    Seychelles Amateur Radio Association (SARA). As of January 2019,
    there were 66 members out of a total of 479 licensed radio amateurs
    in Saudi Arabia. SARA has six members, two of whom are licensed. It
    is believed that there are four licensed amateurs in Seychelles.
    Voting will close on October 9.

    +++

    The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) has announced a Cricket
    World Cup Amateur Radio Marathon, from May 30 until July 14. The
    Cricket World Cup will take place in England and Wales. UK and
    international call signs will be active on nine HF bands on SSB, CW,
    and digital modes. Award certificates will be offered based on the
    number of contacts made with the special UK and international
    stations. Sponsors are inviting other countries to take part and to
    activate special call signs with the suffix "19CWC" or similar. A
    total of 31 special call signs will be on the air in the UK, with
    GB19CWC representing the 2019 Cricket World Cup Headquarters in
    England. Listen for other "GB19" prefix call signs. Teams will field
    special event stations as well. Details, including the rules for
    awards and a list of international call signs, are on the RSGB
    website. Follow your progress on the Ham Log website. Email for more
    information on the marathon. -- Thanks to Nick Totterdell, G4FAL

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * May 31 - June 1 -- Arizona State Convention, Prescott, Arizona
    * May 31 - June 2 -- Northwestern Division Convention, Seaside,
    Oregon
    * June 1 -- Georgia Section Convention, Marietta, Georgia
    * June 1 - 2 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention, Prospect,
    Pennsylvania
    * June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention (Ham-Com), Plano,
    Texas
    * June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention, Owensville, Ohio
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, June 07, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    June 6, 2019

    * Emergency Messaging Demonstration for Red Cross, FEMA is a
    Success
    * Ohio ARES Activates in Wake of Tornadoes that Badly Damaged Hara
    Arena
    * Hurricane Michael Investigation Digs into Factors that Hindered
    Wireless Services Recovery
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * New FT4 Beta Release "Leaps and Bounds" Better than Earlier
    Iterations
    * China Set to Launch New Amateur Satellite with "Sail Ball"
    Stabilization
    * Mexican Amateur Radio Volunteers Provide Communication in
    Wildfire Response
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * AMSAT, ARISS Veteran Keith D. Pugh, W5IU, SK
    * Yasme Foundation Designates Supporting Grant, Excellence Award
    Recipients
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Emergency Messaging Demonstration for Red Cross, FEMA is a Success

    On May 23, with Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency
    (FEMA) officials monitoring, dozens of radio amateurs along the US
    east coast demonstrated Amateur Radio's ability to deliver messages
    without commercial power, infrastructure, or permanently established
    stations. The event took place in coordination with ARRL, as a mock
    response to a simulated disaster scenario -- a major hurricane with
    mass casualties. During the event, radio amateurs at portable
    stations from New England to the Carolinas delivered message traffic
    to W1AW, which coordinated and delivered the information to officials
    attending a joint Red Cross-FEMA meeting in Baltimore.

    W1AW Station Manager Joe Carcia,
    NJ1Q (front), and ARRL Emergency
    Preparedness Assistant Manager Ken
    Bailey, K1FUG, working the mics
    while Red Cross volunteer Rosty
    Slabicky, W2ROS, looks on. [Michelle
    Patnode, W3MVP, photo]

    "About a dozen stations participated in the demonstration, including
    operators in Maine, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, northern
    New Jersey, western Pennsylvania, Delaware, and South Carolina," ARRL
    Communications Manager Dave Isgur, N1RSN, said. "Red Cross officials
    were on-site at W1AW and at the receiving station in Baltimore. At
    both sites, they indicated that were impressed with Amateur Radio's
    ability to deliver messages digitally so that could be displayed on a
    computer screen and in a format that matched the format for messages
    that the Red Cross uses." Isgur said ABC, CBS, and Fox TV affiliates
    sent reporting teams to W1AW.

    A few stations, including W1AW and stations in Baltimore, generated
    local media coverage of their participation, much of it tied into the
    notion of "Amateur Radio operators and the partner agencies they
    serve are getting ready for the 2018 hurricane season," which begins
    on June 1 and continues through November 30.

    W1AW Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, said the exercise went well
    overall. "Conditions were a bit tepid at best, but we were able to
    establish voice contact first, and then proceed with the digital
    traffic (MT63-1KS) during the roll call," Carcia said. "Digital
    signals were good. I needed just one retransmit. We used fldigi with
    flmsg. This made life so much easier."

    +++
    Ohio ARES Activates in Wake of Tornadoes that Badly Damaged Hara
    Arena

    Hara Arena, in Trotwood, Ohio, which served as the home for Dayton
    Hamvention^(R) for more than 6 decades, was among the structures
    extensively damaged when tornadoes swept through the Dayton area on
    Memorial Day. WHIO-TV drone video showed that the roof and side of
    the structure had been blown off in several places by the EF3
    (severe-scale damage) event. Ohio Section Emergency Coordinator Stan
    Broadway, N8BHL, said ARES counties and districts activated after
    nearly 40 tornado warnings were issued across the state. He said Ohio
    ARES was in the process of announcing a partnership with the Ohio
    Emergency Management Agency Watch Desk, in which some 2,000 Ohio
    radio amateurs will feed situation awareness to the state.

    "Our plan was to use the Ohio DMR statewide talk group along with our
    normal HF 80-meter voice and digital nets -- depending on storm
    noise," Broadway said. "We got to launch that system under pressure
    [on] Memorial Day." Broadway said information received from radio
    amateurs during the all-night effort was fed directly into the
    state's WebEOC software to help the Watch Desk determine the need to
    assist county EMA directors requests for aid. The Ohio AuxComm's
    W8SGT was on the air continuously, receiving reports from county ARES
    groups, he added.

    The severe weather struck after dark, causing widespread damage in
    and around Dayton and elsewhere in the Miami Valley. Multiple
    injuries and one fatality have been reported. It appears that at
    least two tornadoes were responsible for most of the devastation,
    which was called "catastrophic." The NWS office in Wilmington, Ohio,
    estimated that at one point, storms and tornadoes left some 5 million
    people without electrical power.

    Snow plows were repurposed to remove debris from Interstate Route 75,
    and the American Red Cross set up shelters to accommodate displaced
    residents.

    "First-tier communications remained solid in most of the affected
    areas," Broadway recounted, "but amateur operators were able to
    provide situational awareness that enhanced the response." Most ARES
    activities in Ohio wrapped up on May 29.

    WHIO-TV reported on June 5 that structural engineers were still
    assessing the damage at Hara Arena, but Michael Heitz, the Kentucky
    developer who now owns the building and the surrounding 120 acres,
    has expressed confidence that the main arena can be saved, although
    an attached section will have to be demolished.

    +++

    Hurricane Michael Investigation Digs into Factors that Hindered
    Wireless Services Recovery

    On May 9, the FCC's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau
    released a report on its investigation into communications providers'
    preparation for and response to Hurricane Michael last October. An
    array of Amateur Radio public service assets was active as Hurricane
    Michael made landfall near Mexico Beach on the Florida Panhandle,
    boasting devastating 155 MPH winds. The storm was the first Category
    4 or stronger hurricane to hit the Florida Panhandle since 1992.

    The FCC investigation found that three key factors -- insufficiently
    resilient backhaul connectivity, inadequate reciprocal roaming
    arrangements, and a lack of coordination between wireless service
    providers, power crews, and municipalities -- were the predominant
    causes behind what the FCC called "the unacceptably slow restoration
    of wireless service in the Florida Panhandle" in the storm's wake.
    According to the FCC, its investigation even found that recovery
    efforts themselves often led to communication outages.

    "There were numerous cases in which a wireless provider had restored
    service to customers only to have that service brought down as
    third-party crews damaged communications assets while clearing trash
    or restoring power lines and utility poles," the FCC recounted in a
    news release.

    To improve recovery efforts from future storms, the report
    recommended, among other things, that wireless providers use diverse
    backhaul options, such as microwave links and satellite links in
    hurricane-prone areas, and that communication providers participate
    in training to improve coordination of restoration efforts.

    The Hurricane Michael Report is available at on the FCC website. --
    FCC News Release

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Stringing Up Wire Antennas" is the topic of the new (June 6) episode
    of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet,
    or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to
    doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone
    or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can
    also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration
    required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free
    Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never
    listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.

    New FT4 Beta Release "Leaps and Bounds" Better than Earlier
    Iterations

    The WSJT-X Development Group released yet another new beta version of
    the FT4 protocol this week, and WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc7 is now available for
    testing. Developers point out that the FT4 included in this "release
    candidate 7" version is not compatible with any previous releases. A
    short mock contest session to wring out the contesting features of
    FT4 took place on June 4.

    "Thanks to all who participated in yesterday's FT4 mock-contest
    practice session -- and especially to those who provided useful
    feedback. It is much appreciated!" said developer Joe Taylor, K1JT.
    "Everyone likes the 7.5-second T/R sequences, which provide operators
    with significantly more human interaction time than in previous
    revisions of FT4. Users also appreciated the sensitivity improvements
    and a larger range of acceptable time offsets (DT)." DT represents
    the combined clock difference for the transmitting and receiving
    computers, he explained.

    Based on data compiled by Steve Franke, K9AN, Taylor said that it
    appears developers have the WSJT-X timing behavior under good control
    on all supported platforms, and the range of measured signal-to-noise
    values extended down to -21 dB.

    "I operated for about 3 hours using 100 W and a dipole," Taylor
    recounted. "I copied transmissions from 263 unique call signs and
    made 143 QSOs in 29 states, 5 Canadian provinces, and 15 DXCCs."

    Taylor said the developers anticipate addressing all remaining issues
    they're aware of. "I believe we are on a good path toward a General
    Availability (GA) release of WSJT-X 2.1.0 by mid-July," he said.

    Steve Franke, K9AN, of the WSJT-X Development
    Group spent most of his time observing during
    the mock contest on June 4, decoding some 25,300
    FT4 transmissions. This chart represents
    signal-to-noise ratios reported.

    "This new version of FT4 is leaps and bounds better than before,"
    said Mike Black, W9MDB, in a June 4 post to the Yahoo WSJT Meteor
    Scatter and Weak Signal Group. "I worked almost everybody I could see
    without any repeats. Seems like we have a winner here."

    Changes, improvements, and bug fixes that have been made since WSJT-X
    2.1.0-rc5 include:
    * T/R sequence length increased from 6.0 to 7.5 seconds.
    * Signal bandwidth decreased from 90 Hz to 80 Hz.
    * Improved sensitivity: Threshold S/N is now -17.5 dB.

    Release candidate WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc7 will be available for beta-testing
    through July 21, and it will permanently cease to function after that
    date. It will not be usable during the ARRL June VHF Contest or
    during ARRL Field Day. Taylor advised using WSJT-X 2.0.1 and FT8 for
    these events.

    Downloadable installation packages for WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc7 under
    Windows, Linux, and macOS are available on the WSJT-X web page.
    China Set to Launch New Amateur Satellite with "Sail Ball"
    Stabilization

    Chinese Amateur Satellite Group (CAMSAT) has announced the impending
    launch of the CAS-7B satellite, also designated as BP-1B, a
    short-lived spacecraft that will carry an Amateur Radio payload. An
    unusual feature of the spacecraft is its "sail ball" passive
    stabilization system. The 1.5 U CubeSat is attached to a
    500-millimeter flexible film ball -- or sail -- that will offer
    passive "pneumatic resistance" stabilization, the announcement said.
    CAS-7B is expected to remain in orbit for up to 1 month.

    The spacecraft will carry an Amateur Radio transponder and
    educational mission. CAMSAT is working with the Beijing Institute of
    Technology (BIT), a top aerospace school, which is providing launch
    support. BIT faculty and students are participating in the
    development and testing of the satellite, and, with CAMSAT's help,
    the university has established an Amateur Radio club (BI1LG). CAMSAT
    said many students are now members, "learning Amateur Radio satellite
    communication and [experiencing] endless fun."

    The VHF and UHF antennas are quarter-wave monopoles. CAS-7B will
    transmit a CW telemetry beacon on 435.715 MHz. The V/U FM voice
    transponder downlink will be 435.690 MHz, and the transponder uplink
    will be 145.900 MHz (16 kHz passband).

    CAS-7B during testing. [CAMSAT
    photo]

    The 3-kilogram satellite will have an apogee of 300 kilometers.

    "Because of the orbital apogee and the size and mass of the
    satellite, the orbital life is expected to be only 1 week, up to a
    maximum of 1 month, which will also provide an opportunity for hams
    to track and monitor satellite entering the atmosphere," CAMSAT said
    in announcing the new satellite, scheduled for launch late this
    month.

    "The launch will use a new launch vehicle from a small commercial
    rocket company," CAMSAT explained. "This is the first launch of this
    launch vehicle, and there is a large possibility of failure; if the
    launch fails, we will have another launch later this year." -- Thanks
    to Alan Kung, BA1DU/CAMSAT

    Mexican Amateur Radio Volunteers Provide Communication in Wildfire
    Response

    Mexican radio amateurs provided communication support in late May
    from a fire scene in a remote area to civil protection authorities in
    Monterrey, Mexico. Two-member teams of volunteers were flown in via
    helicopter since May 20, the first day of radio support, when the
    fire had already been burning for a couple of days. The fire in
    Pajonal -- about 20 kilometers south of Monterrey -- covered more
    than 200 acres in rough terrain. Temperatures topped 100 °F.

    Fueled by hot and dry conditions, Mexico's 2019 fire season has been
    intense, leading to poor air quality. By mid-May, more than 100
    wildfires were active in 17 Mexican states.

    Teams had been using Winlink but added the weak-signal software Vara
    HF, after José Alberto Nieto, EA5HVK, provided a Vara license on
    short notice. Tom Whiteside, N5TW, in Georgetown, Texas, supported
    the effort from across the border, aiming his 40- and 20-meter arrays
    in the direction of the fire in Nuevo Leon. Alfonso Tamez, XE2O,
    president of Mexico's IARU member-society Federación Mexicana de
    Radioexperimentadores (FMRE), was been among the volunteers.

    In addition to HF digital traffic, the volunteer teams took advantage
    of VHF repeaters. HF antennas consisted of a 40-meter dipole for 40
    and a steerable portable dipole. A generator is providing electrical
    power.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: According to Spaceweather.com, as
    of June 5 there have been no sunspots for 17 days in a row. Average
    daily solar flux went to 69.5 for the May 30 - June 5 reporting week
    from 67.4 in the previous 7 days. The average daily planetary A index
    declined from 7.3 to 5.6, while the mid-latitude A index dipped from
    8.1 to 5.

    Last week I suggested that sunspots should return soon, based on the
    predicted solar flux, but those projections have softened. On June 5
    the 45-day predicted solar flux was 70 on June 6 - 13; 72 on June 14
    - 16; 71 on June 17; 70 on June 18 - 29; 71 on June 30; 72 on July 1
    - 13; 71 on July 14, and 70 on July 15 - 20.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5, 8, 10, and 8 on June 6 - 9; 5 on
    June 10 - 22; 8, 10, 12, and 8 on June 23 - 26; 5 on June 27 - 29; 8
    on June 30 - July 2; 5 on July 3 - 4; 8 on July 5 - 6; 5 on July 7 -
    19, and 8 on July 20.

    Spaceweather.com reported on June 5 that Northern Hemisphere radars
    were "pinging with activity" from a strong daytime meteor shower.

    In Friday's bulletin, read about recent openings on 10 and 6 meters.

    Sunspot numbers for May - June 5, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0,
    with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 68.7, 68.7, 69.7,
    69.9, 69.8, 70, and 69.8, with a mean of 69.5. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 8, 5, 4, 4, 5, 8, and 5, with a mean of 5.6. Middle
    latitude A index was 8, 5, 3, 4, 4, 7, and 4, with a mean of 5.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    * June 7 -- HA3NS Sprint Memorial Contest (CW)
    * June 8 -- Asia-Pacific Sprint, SSB
    * June 8 - 9 DRCG WW RTTY Contest
    * June 8 - 9 -- VK Shires Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 8 - 9 -- Portugal Day Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 8 - 9 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * June 8 - 9 -- GACW WWSA CW DX Contest
    * June 8 - 9 -- REF DDFM 6-Meter Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 8 - 10 -- ARRL June VHF Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 9 -- All Cookie Crumble QRP Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 10 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * June 10 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (Digital)
    * June 12 -- NAQCC CW Sprint (CW)

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    AMSAT, ARISS Veteran Keith D. Pugh, W5IU, SK

    AMSAT and ARISS engineering veteran, Keith Pugh, W5IU, of Fort Worth,
    Texas, died on May 24. An ARRL Life Member, he was 80.

    Born and raised in Dodge City, Kansas, Pugh was licensed in 1953.
    Amateur Radio strongly influenced his decision to pursue a career in
    electrical engineering, and he earned a Bachelor of Science in
    electrical engineering at Kansas State University in 1961. He moved
    to Texas to work for Convair (later General Dynamics and Lockheed
    Martin), and, after upgrading to an Amateur Extra-class license, he
    became W5IU. Pugh retired from Lockheed Martin in 2004 after a career
    in RADAR and Navigation Systems Engineering.

    At Dayton Hamvention^(R), Pugh
    volunteered in the AMSAT Booth for
    many years and frequently headed up
    the Dayton Hamvention Satellite
    Demonstration Station.

    In the early 1980s, he became interested in ham radio satellites,
    making contacts on AO-08 and AO-10. He went on to become an AMSAT
    Area Coordinator and, later served as AMSAT Vice President for
    Operations.

    Pugh jump-started his passion for Amateur Radio on human spaceflight
    missions in 1991, when the Soviet space station Mir was in orbit.
    Pugh joined the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
    (ARISS) team in 2004, where he has provided support as an operations
    leader, mentoring numerous schools and ARISS contact organizations
    and attending ARISS International meetings.

    ARISS ARRL Representative Rosalie White, K1STO, said Pugh made a
    difference in his role as an ARISS Technical Mentor for many schools.
    "ARISS contacts are always exciting and sometimes produce tense
    moments," White said. "He touched hundreds of thousands of youth
    along with all ages of people who had curiosity about ham radio,
    space, and satellites."
    Yasme Foundation Designates Supporting Grant, Excellence Award
    Recipients

    The Board of Directors of The Yasme Foundation has awarded $5,000
    each to the Foundation for Amateur Radio (FAR) and ARRL scholarship
    programs for 2019, and $5,000 in general support to World Radiosport
    Team Championship 2022 (WRTC 2022) in Italy and a second grant to
    sponsor the so-called "Widow's Ball" during WRTC 2022.

    The Yasme Foundation Board also announced recipients of the Yasme
    Excellence Award. They are:
    * Angel Vazquez, WP3R, for his work in disaster relief, and as an
    outstanding ambassador for Amateur Radio.
    * Nikola Percin, 9A5W, for his outstanding work in advancing
    Amateur Radio in Croatia and the surrounding region. He is a
    cofounder of 9A1A. Percin initiated efforts to recruit young
    amateurs and established youth programs in coordination with
    local universities.

    The Yasme Excellence Award recognizes individuals and groups who,
    through their own service, creativity, effort, and dedication, have
    made significant contributions to Amateur Radio. These may be in
    recognition of technical, operating, or organizational achievement,
    as all three are necessary for the growth of Amateur Radio. The Yasme
    Excellence Award is in the form of a cash grant and an individually
    engraved crystal globe.
    In Brief...

    The next Kids Day is Saturday, June 15. That's the day to get
    youngsters on the air to share in the joy and fun that Amateur Radio
    has to offer. Kids Day gets under way at 1800 UTC and concludes at
    2359 UTC. Sponsored by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this
    event has a simple exchange, suitable for younger operators: first
    name, age, location, and favorite color. After that, the contact can
    be as long or as short as each participant prefers. Look for activity
    on these frequencies: 10 meters: 28.350 - 28.400 MHz; 12 meters:
    24.960 - 24.980 MHz; 15 meters: 21.360 - 21.400 MHz; 17 meters:
    18.140 - 18.145 MHz; 20 meters: 14.270 - 14.300 MHz; 40 meters: 7.270
    - 7.290 MHz, and 80 meters: 3.740 - 3.940 MHz. Repeater contacts are
    okay with permission of the repeater owner. As with any on-the-air
    activity that includes unlicensed individuals, control operators must
    observe third-party traffic restrictions when making DX contacts.
    Additional details are on the ARRL website.

    +++

    LoTW is now accepting FT4 contacts. The latest TQSL update
    (Config.xml version 11.8), released on May 22, includes FT4 as a
    submode of MFSK. It also adds AISAT-1 and PO-101 in the satellite
    category. As of June 5, more 1 billion contact records have been
    entered into the system, resulting in 201,492,514 contact
    confirmations. LoTW has 118,729 users worldwide.

    +++

    Adafruit Industries Founder Limor Fried, AC2SN, was one of two 2019
    Women in Open Source Award winners. Sponsored by open-source solution
    provider Red Hat, the awards honor women who make important
    contributions to open-source projects and communities, or those
    making innovative use of open-source methodology. Nominations for
    this year's awards were accepted for two categories: "Academic" for
    those currently enrolled in a college or university, and "Community"
    for those working on or volunteering with projects related to open
    source. A panel of judges determined finalists based on nomination
    criteria, and the public voted to determine the award winners. Fried
    was recognized in the community category. She is the founder and lead
    engineer at Adafruit Industries, an open-source hardware company
    designed to provide a place for people to learn about and purchase
    open tools, equipment, and electronics online.

    +++

    Tom Roscoe, K8CX, has posted 361 photos in his Ham Gallery of various
    Dayton Hamvention^(R) 2019 events. Hamvention 2019 hosted the ARRL
    National Convention. This is Roscoe's 23rd year of documenting the
    event, bringing the total to 6,053 Hamvention photos, including this
    one of ARRL Washington Counsel David Siddall, K3ZJ. Search the entire
    photo database by entering a call sign. Roscoe also invites photos
    via email, but at least one ham not already listed on his page must
    be in the photo, and all hams shown must be identified by call sign.
    He also accepts Dayton Hamvention photos from past years that meet
    the same requirements, as well as any "interesting stories or fun
    moments" from Dayton Hamvention 2019 or forum reviews for his blog.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention (Ham-Com), Plano,
    Texas
    * June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention, Owensville, Ohio
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 6 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty
    Convention, Normal, Illinois
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur
    Radio's most popular and informative journal, delivered to your
    mailbox each month.
    * Listen to ARRL Audio News, available every Friday.

    Subscribe to...
    * NCJ -- National Contest Journal. Published bimonthly, features
    articles by top contesters, letters, hints, statistics, scores,
    NA Sprint, and QSO parties.
    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
    bimonthly, features technical articles, construction projects,
    columns, and other items of interest to radio amateurs and
    communications professionals.

    Free of charge to ARRL members...
    * Subscribe to the ARES E-Letter (monthly public service and
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    -- and much more!
    * Find ARRL on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
    and registered guests may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by editing
    their profile.

    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
    non-commercial or educational purposes, with attribution. All other
    purposes require written permission.



    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, June 14, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    June 13, 2019

    * Paul Bourque, N1SFE, Joins ARRL Headquarters Staff as Contest
    Program Manager
    * Rick Murphy, K1MU, to Receive ARRL President's Award
    * Tuning Electrically Short Antennas for Field Operation
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * QRZ Institutes Password Security, Seller Verification Programs
    * WSJT-X Developer Posts Observations on Using FT8 in June VHF
    Contest
    * Wireless Power Transmission Prompts Discussion in ITU-R Study
    Group
    * Proposed WRC-23 Agenda Items Causing Concern
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Paul Bourque, N1SFE, Joins ARRL Headquarters Staff as Contest Program
    Manager

    Paul Bourque, N1SFE, of Middletown, Connecticut, has joined the ARRL
    Headquarters staff as Contest Program Manager. He succeeds Bart
    Jahnke, W9JJ, who recently was promoted to the post of ARRL
    Radiosport and Field Services Manager. Licensed since 1994, Bourque's
    interest in radio began when, as a youngster, he listened for distant
    AM stations, and he later developed a career involving various
    aspects of broadcasting.

    "Originally, I wanted to be a DJ, but I ended up being drawn to the
    technical/engineering side of the radio business," Bourque said. His
    journey into Amateur Radio started during his time as the host of an
    overnight free-form rock music show at WWUH Radio at the University
    of Hartford, and the station's general manager, John Ramsey, W1JNR,
    pushed him to get his license.

    Because being an Amateur Radio operator had opened several
    professional doors for him, Bourque said, "The opportunity to give
    back to this hobby as Contest Program Manager really appealed to me."

    Bourque, who grew up in Newington, remarked that working at ARRL
    Headquarters "is like coming home." In his early years as a radio
    amateur, he was more of a casual contester, and it "was about making
    contacts," he conceded. Today, though, he has become passionate about
    getting people active and on the air. As Contest Program Manager,
    Bourque wants to find ways to get newer hams into contesting, and to
    dispel the idea that you need tons of equipment to participate.

    Bourque's other interests include cooking, astronomy, photography,
    and meteorology.
    Rick Murphy, K1MU, to Receive ARRL President's Award

    At its May 20 meeting in Dayton, Ohio, the ARRL Executive Committee,
    acting on behalf of the Board of Directors, conferred the prestigious
    ARRL President's Award on Rick Murphy, K1MU, one of the unsung heroes
    of Logbook of The World (LoTW). The President's Award recognizes
    individuals showing long-term dedication in support of ARRL programs.
    Murphy was credited for his work to upgrade and improve the LoTW TQSL
    software to help users more easily and successfully use LoTW. Murphy
    was cited for single-handedly rewriting TQSL to make it accessible to
    those with limited vision, to display information in languages other
    than English (more than 10 so far), and for providing consistent
    online support to users.

    "Rick is richly deserving of this honor for his efforts to make the
    TQSL application and Logbook of The World more accessible to all
    users," said ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR. "Rick Murphy
    embodies the spirit of unselfish volunteerism that represents the
    best of Amateur Radio."

    An information security professional, Murphy, who lives in Annandale,
    Virginia, is coauthor (with Rickland D. Hollar) of the book
    Enterprise Web Services Security. He's a volunteer Incoming QSL
    Bureau card sorter for the 3rd call district and a past president of
    the National Capital DX Association.

    The President's Award plaque bears the likeness of ARRL's cofounder
    and first president Hiram Percy Maxim, W1AW.

    Tuning Electrically Short Antennas for Field Operation

    An article,"Tuning Electrically Short Antennas for Field Operation,"
    by two well-known amateurs, appeared in Microwave Journal. Authored
    by QEX Editor Kai Siwiak, KE4PT, and award-winning researcher Ulrich
    Rohde, N1UL, the article points out that both Amateur Radio and
    military applications exist for 20 W battery-powered radios equipped
    with whip antennas. "In general, the whip antenna [that] makes the
    radio portable is not optimized for signal propagation: A whip
    antenna has no ground return or proper counterpoise," the article
    notes. "While some users drag a wire of up to 8 meters behind, this
    is not an ideal solution."

    Rohde's al fresco test stand
    for short HF antennas.
    [Photo courtesy of Ulrich
    Rohde, N1UL]

    As the article explains, electrically short antennas -- typically 0.1
    I» or shorter -- look like a capacitor, with a typical capacitance of
    25 pF per meter of length. "At 2 MHz, where the wavelength is 150
    meters, an inductor of 84 IČH is required for resonance," the article
    says. But just getting a good VSWR is not all there is to it.

    Rohde told ARRL that loading coil placement in a short vertical
    antenna is critical, and "the greater the elevation of the coil, the
    better the radiation. He said that "center loading" -- he considers
    the "best compromise" to be more on the order of two-thirds' loading
    -- can dramatically affect both the antenna's transmitting and
    receiving performance, as opposed to base loading, as found with
    popular so-called screwdriver antennas. Radials of some sort also are
    essential.

    As the article points out, "With center loading, both the radiation
    resistance and integrated surface are larger, which are better for
    radiation." Inductors are the lossy components of an antenna tuner,
    while capacitors "are infinitely better." The authors conclude that,
    for optimal operation, antenna radials should be 0.25 I», with one
    sufficient for tuning, and up to four producing a symmetrical
    azimuth. "Connecting the HF radio ground to a large metallic object
    is a good choice," the article said.

    Ulrich told ARRL that optimizing an antenna in the manner the article
    describes will produce "significantly better" signal reception,
    although a short antenna will also have a narrower bandwidth. The
    objective should not be to get a good VSWR but to keep in mind that
    there's a difference between resonance and radiation.

    "These requirements for optimum antenna performance make HF manpack
    radios somewhat complicated and unattractive," the authors concede.
    "Nonetheless, the well matched and radiating antenna provides the
    most success, and some of these highly portable radios provide vital
    communications in disaster areas -- recently in Puerto Rico and South
    Florida."

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    So Now What? Podcast

    "Highlights from Hamvention" is the focus of the new (June 13)
    episode of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers. It
    will feature segments from Tony Milluzzi, KD8RTT, and Andy Milluzzi,
    KK4LWR, of The Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative (CARI); Teachers
    Institute instructor Tommy Gober, N5DUX, who was at the ARRL Lifelong
    Learning booth this year; Jet Jurgensmeyer, KE0UWZ, of Last Man
    Standing, and Space Weather Woman Tamitha Skov, WX6SWW. Two aspiring
    hams -- Sarah Byrne, who works in emergency management, and Valencia
    Simpson, who has assisted ARRL at Dayton Hamvention^A(R) for the past
    5 years -- also will be guests.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you
    have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now
    What? offers insights from those who've been just where you are now.
    New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest), and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: The long string of days with no
    sunspots continues, with spots last observed nearly a month ago, on
    May 18. Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 70 on June 13 -
    20, and 68 on June 21 through July 27.

    The predicted planetary A index is 12 and 8 on June 13 - 14; 5 on
    June 15 - 23; 8, 12, and 8 on June 24 - 26; 5 on June 27 - July 5;
    10, 8, 10, and 8 on July 6 - 9; 5 on July 10 - 20; 8, 10, and 8 on
    July 21 - 23, and 5 on July 24 - 27.

    Scott Avery, WA6LIE, wrote to report his experiences during the ARRL
    June VHF Contest last weekend. "During the day, expecting sporadic E,
    we were influenced by a lot of meteor scatter caused by the Beta
    Taurids, a daytime event that is not advertised, as it is not seen
    and only radio astronomers and hams would be interested," he said. "I
    spent a lot of time on 6 meters, FT8 mode [and a] little SSB/CW, and
    the same with 2 meters. I was bombarded with pings [of] CQ TEST, and
    that station was gone. This happened for most of the daylight hours
    with [few contacts]." Avery said an opening to Japan yielded a few
    contacts. A Sunday multi-hop sporadic E opening to the east coast
    also occurred, he said.

    Sunspot numbers for June 6 - 12 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with a
    mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 68.9, 68.9, 68.4, 68.4, 68.9,
    69.7, and 69.5, with a mean of 69. Estimated planetary A indices were
    3, 4, 18, 6, 3, 3, and 4, with a mean of 5.9. Middle latitude A index
    was 4, 6, 14, 8, 4, 3, and 5, with a mean of 6.3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * June 15 -- ARRL Kids Day (Phone)
    * June 15 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * June 15 -- AGCW VHF/UHF Contest (CW)
    * June 15 - 16 -- SMIRK Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 15 - 16 -- All Asian DX Contest, CW
    * June 15 - 16 -- Ukrainian DX Classic RTTY Contest
    * June 15 - 16 -- ARR BPSK63 Contest
    * June 15 - 16 -- IARU Region 1 50 MHz Contest (CW, phone)
    * June 15 - 16 -- Stew Perry Topband Challenge (CW)
    * June 15 - 16 -- West Virginia QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 16 -- WAB 50 MHz Phone Contest
    * June 17 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * June 19 -- RSGB 80 Meter Club Championship, CW
    * June 20 -- NAQCC CW Sprint

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    QRZ Institutes Password Security, Seller Verification Programs

    In an effort to combat fraudsters and password phishers, the popular
    QRZ Amateur Radio website is offering the option of establishing
    two-factor authentication (2FA) for its registered users. The site's
    founder and president, Fred Lloyd, AA7BQ, explains that 2FA secures a
    user's password on the site.

    "With 2FA, your actual password becomes nearly moot, and revealing it
    to a crook has no detrimental effect," Lloyd told ARRL. "With 2FA,
    you need the one-time code, and that's the only thing that will work.
    It's a solid technology that is rapidly gaining in popularity."

    Lloyd said that when a user logs into the site with 2FA, the
    validation for the session is stored in the user's browser as an
    encrypted cookie that can live for up to 30 days. He said QRZ.com
    staffers have been using 2FA successfully for a couple of years now.
    A video has been posted that demonstrates how to get started with 2FA
    without using a cell phone to receive codes.

    Although 2FA will not become a requirement in order to log onto
    QRZ.com, a separate seller verification system has been instituted
    for anyone marketing ham gear via the Swapmeet forum. As of July 1,
    only those enrolled in the Verified User program will be able to list
    in that forum. Users may opt out of the Verified User program for the
    rest of the site.

    "While verification is available to anyone on QRZ, it is required
    only in the Swapmeet section," Lloyd told ARRL. "Lately, there has
    been as many as a scam per day in the Swapmeet, and sometimes a
    popular radio model will be sold several times before it comes to our
    attention. One false listing can net any number of victims before
    it's discovered."

    QRZ Founder and President Fred
    Lloyd, AA7BQ.

    Lloyd explained that these fake listings are being placed using the
    accounts of users who have been tricked into giving out their log-in
    passwords though elaborate phishing schemes. "There is virtually
    nothing that QRZ can do to prevent phishing attacks, as a great many
    users never even know that they've been hacked," Lloyd allowed.
    "Scammers find it relatively easy to trick the users into supplying
    their actual passwords."

    Setting up two-factor authentication is the first step to becoming a
    QRZ.com Verified User. Information on becoming a Verified User is
    available to those registered on the site via their Account page,
    accessible from the QRZ main page. Once they've secured their
    accounts with 2FA, members will have to submit photographic
    identification to QRZ in order to complete the Verified User process.
    Read more.
    WSJT-X Developer Posts Observations on Using FT8 in June VHF Contest

    WSJT-X developer Joe Taylor, K1JT, has tentatively concluded that
    there are good reasons to use both FT4 and FT8 in ARRL VHF contests.
    The latest beta version of FT4 was not available for the event, but
    Taylor noted that FT4 will be available for future contests

    (the current -rc7 beta version will not be usable during ARRL Field
    Day either). Taylor, who was active in the VHF event over the past
    weekend, made the remark in a post to the Packrats reflector. Taylor
    reported making 433 contacts (21 dupes) in 152 grids, all, by and
    large, on FT8.

    "Most of the time there was enough sporadic E and tropo-scatter to
    keep things busy using FT8," Taylor observed. "In this event, meteor
    scatter using MSK144 was not, score-wise, time efficient."

    Taylor said he operated from home only on 6 meters and only on
    digital, "mainly to see how FT8 plays in a June VHF Contest." He
    operated for 21 of the contest's 33 hours and left his receiver
    running on 50.313 MHz when not in the shack.

    Joe Taylor, K1JT.
    [Bob Inderbitzen,
    NQ1R, photo]

    "During the contest period, I decoded 45,375 transmissions from
    others in the 4 kHz window starting at 50.313 MHz," Taylor recounted.
    "That's an average of about 11 decodes per 15-second receive cycle."

    Taylor said he seldom, if ever, found that a single 3 or 4 kHz window
    was "too crowded" with activity. "There were nearly always some open
    spots, even with nearly everyone in the first 2.7 kHz of the window,"
    he said.

    Taylor also speculated as to how the twice-as-fast FT4 might have
    fared, being 4 dB less sensitive than FT8 and having an 80 Hz
    bandwidth instead of FT8's 50 Hz bandwidth.

    "My guess is that something like 80 - 85% of my QSOs could have been
    completed using FT4, most of them in half the time than it took in
    FT8," Taylor said.

    Wireless Power Transmission Prompts Discussion in ITU-R Study Group

    The emerging wireless power transmission (WPT) technology and
    associated applications came under closer scrutiny during the
    May/June meeting of International Telecommunication Union
    Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) Study Group 1 and its Working
    Parties. Participants wrapped up 7 days of sessions in Geneva on June
    7, with International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 (IARU-R1)
    President Don Beattie, G3BJ, representing the IARU. The primary
    concern over WPT centers on its interference potential.

    "Work was advanced on reports on WPT at 100 - 148.5 kHz for low-power
    charging of portable devices, for WPT for electric vehicles (WPT-EV)
    at around 20, 60, and 85 kHz, and for 'beam' WPT for remote
    charging," IARU Region 1 reported. "All of these technologies have
    the potential for harmful interference to radiocommunication services
    if not carefully managed, particularly the harmonics of the WPT
    systems."

    The IARU has submitted formal studies on the impact of WPT on the
    Amateur Service, and these have been incorporated into a single
    completed report and will inform a new recommendation being developed
    on WPT emissions.

    IARU says it's advocating "proper emission limits" to protect radio
    services and is working with other spectrum users and administrations
    that share its concerns.

    IARU Region 1
    President Don
    Beattie, G3BJ.

    The ITU meetings discussed emerging proposals for WPT-EV emission
    limits from the International Special Committee on Radio Interference
    (CISPR), where there is a level of concern that these limits fall
    short of providing the necessary protection to radiocommunication
    services. Founded in 1934, CISPR sets standards for controlling
    electromagnetic interference in electrical and electronic devices and
    equipment.

    The issue of WPT-EV is World Radiocommunication Conference 2019
    (WRC-19) Agenda Item 9.1.6. In a WPT status report at the IARU Region
    1 Interim Meeting in Vienna in late April, Beattie said the Amateur
    Service is "highly susceptible to any increase in the background
    noise level," such as that WPT might generate.

    He said frequencies being planned for WPT are 19 - 21 kHz for high
    power; 55 - 65 kHz and 79 - 90 kHz for medium power, and 100 - 148.5
    kHz for lower power -- but still up to 2.4 kW.

    "WPT is generally high duty cycle, located in residential areas, and
    its harmonics are likely to be spread across a band of frequencies,
    in some cases the whole of the HF spectrum," Beattie said in his
    presentation to the Vienna interim meeting. Read more.
    Proposed WRC-23 Agenda Items Causing Concern

    Two proposals under discussion in Europe as possible World
    Radiocommunication Conference 2023 (WRC-23) agenda items "could
    impact important Amateur Radio frequencies," IARU reported this week.
    Included is a proposal from France to consider the 144 - 146 MHz band
    as a primary allocation to the Aeronautical Mobile service, as part
    of a broader consideration of spectrum allocated to that service.
    IARU also cautioned the amateur community against overreacting to the
    news.

    France will submit a paper containing a proposal for an agenda item
    for "new non-safety Aeronautical Mobile applications" at the June 17
    - 21 Conference Preparatory Group meeting of the European Conference
    of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) in Prague.
    The 144 - 146 MHz segment is a primary global Amateur and Amateur
    Satellite allocation. IARU said it "views with grave concern any
    proposal to include this band in the proposed study" and pledged to
    "energetically" promote this viewpoint in the appropriate forums "to
    seek to obtain assurances that the spectrum will remain a primary
    allocation for the amateur services."

    Another proposal has been raised to study the 23-centimeter amateur
    allocation, 1240 - 1300 MHz, following reports of interference to the
    Galileo navigation system -- Europe's GPS system. IARU said it's
    aware of "a handful of cases" of reported interference to the Galileo
    E6 signal on 1278.750 MHz. According to IARU, joint studies have been
    carried out to assess the vulnerability of the system and, based on
    these, it considers the proposal to initiate an Agenda item for
    WRC-23 premature.

    IARU asked its member-societies to "refrain at this time from making
    speculative public comments about the situation until further
    progress has been made in regulatory discussions," and said it's
    ready to discuss the issue with other non-IARU societies.

    One European Amateur Radio organization already has called for radio
    amateurs to "occupy" 2 meters on June 15 for 1 hour in protest of the
    French proposal.
    In Brief...

    Support ARRL as you shop Amazon Smile for Father's Day, Sunday, June
    16. If you're looking for the perfect gift, we invite you to shop at
    AmazonSmile and choose American Radio Relay League Inc. (ARRL) as
    your charity of choice. With every purchase you make at AmazonSmile,
    Amazon will make a contribution to ARRL. This helps the League to
    extend its reach in public service, advocacy, education, technology,
    and membership. Amazon has a large variety of gifts that are perfect
    for Father's Day, including electronics, clothing, ham radio
    equipment, and more. Make Dad's day! Get him something extra special
    this year while supporting his favorite hobby. Bookmark ARRL's link
    and support Amateur Radio and ARRL every time you shop online.

    AMSAT President and ARRL Life Member Joe Spier, K6WAO, has been
    awarded Russia's E.T. Krenkel Medal. The prestigious honor is
    bestowed on individuals and organizations for outstanding global
    contributions to Amateur Radio. Spier has also served AMSAT as
    Executive Vice President, and Vice President, Educational Relations.
    The award's namesake, Ernst Teodorovich Krenkel, was a radio amateur
    who, over the years, used the call signs RAEM, U3AA, and UA3AA. Spier
    became AMSAT President in 2017. He's a supporter of Amateur Radio on
    the International Space Station (ARISS) and of scientific, technical,
    engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Spier also is a Life
    Member of the Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers (SARA). ARRL
    Headquarters staff alumna and Life Member Ellen White, W1YL, was
    awarded the Krenkel medal in May. -- Thanks to AMSAT
    Getting It Right

    The story, "Emergency Messaging Demonstration for Red Cross, FEMA is
    a Success, in the June 6 edition of The ARRL Letter omitted Virginia
    from the list of states where radio amateurs participated in the
    exercise.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention, Owensville, Ohio
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 6 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty
    Convention, Normal, Illinois
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    Subscribe to...
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.



    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, June 21, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    June 20, 2019

    * ARRL Executive Committee Establishes Hoc Committee on
    Communications
    * ARRL Files Interim Report with FCC in "Symbol Rate" Proceeding
    * LightSail 2 Set to Launch on June 22
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * ARRL, IARU Contingents to Attend HAM RADIO 2019 in Germany
    * Radio Amateur to Lose License as Part of Enforcement Case
    Settlement
    * Pennsylvania Radio Amateur Dies in Tower Installation Mishap
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Historic 2-Meter Transatlantic Contact Reported
    * ARRL ARDF Coordinator Steps Down, New Coordinator Named
    * Morse Code is Still a Hit
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Internet Access to some ARRL Systems May Be Disrupted on June 23

    Maintenance work on Sunday, June 23, may disrupt internet access to
    ARRL Headquarters systems -- including VPN connections and Logbook of
    The World. The main website should remain online during this outage,
    which could last for up to 6 hours on June 23, which will start at
    approximately midnight EDT (0400 UTC on June 24). All services will
    automatically resume as soon as connectivity is restored. Email
    should not be affected. Any orders placed via the ARRL Store during
    the outage will be queued for handling after connectivity returns. We
    apologize for any inconvenience.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Executive Committee Establishes Hoc Committee on
    Communications

    Meeting right after Dayton Hamvention^(R) at the University of Dayton
    on May 20, the ARRL Board's Executive Committee (EC) adopted a motion
    to establish an Hoc Committee on Communications with ARRL Members.
    The panel would review ARRL communications with members and members'
    perceptions to "consider areas needing enhancement," and it would
    "propose concrete changes in communication processes and methods by
    which improvements may be accomplished," according to the resolution.
    ARRL Vice President Greg Widin, K0GW, will chair the committee.

    In his remarks to the EC, President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said he's
    been receiving positive feedback from members. He also reported
    receiving numerous questions regarding the Amateur Radio Parity Act.
    He stressed that ARRL needs to assure members that it has not given
    up on the initiative, which was put on hold earlier this year. At the
    same meeting, ARRL Pacific Division Director Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT,
    updated the EC on efforts to reassess the Amateur Radio Parity Act.
    He said the Board's Legislative Committee is working on a plan of
    action to go before the full Board at its July meeting.

    President Roderick, who chaired the EC meeting, said he remains
    concerned that Technician licensees, who make up more than half of
    the US Amateur Radio population, only comprise some 16% of ARRL
    members.

    The EC referred to the Administration and Finance (A&F) Committee for
    its consideration of a suggested graduated ARRL Life Membership dues
    reduction after an individual has reached a certain age. The EC asked
    the A&F Committee for recommendations to the full Board in January
    2020.

    The Executive Committee expressed its thanks and extended its
    compliments to the ARRL staff and volunteers for "their outstanding
    work at the just-completed National Convention as part of Dayton
    Hamvention 2019."

    The minutes of the May 20 Executive Committee meeting have been
    posted on the ARRL website.
    ARRL Files Interim Report with FCC in "Symbol Rate" Proceeding

    ARRL has filed an interim report with the FCC in order to report on
    its efforts to find common ground regarding issues surrounding the
    "symbol" or "baud" rate proceeding, FCC Docket WT 16-239 (the FCC has
    issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in WT 16-239, which stemmed
    from ARRL's rulemaking petition RM-11708). ARRL highlighted that the
    public benefits from the FCC's "fairly flexible" regulation of
    Amateur Radio, citing innovative developments in digital technology,
    including WSJT-X.

    Noting that more than 1,400 comments in total have been filed in this
    and on a related rulemaking petition (RM-11831), ARRL pointed out
    that, as in other Commission-regulated areas, adapting current
    regulations to rapidly evolving technology presents challenges that
    may require adjustments to, or clarifications of, the governing
    regulations. Making such adjustments can be a challenge to ensure
    that valid regulatory purposes continue to be served without
    hindering technological change and innovation in the process.

    While a June 11 meeting organized by ARRL had to be reset to
    accommodate the invited parties, ARRL has re-affirmed its commitment
    to protecting the interests of all amateurs. ARRL said it will
    continue to pursue its efforts to address and reconcile differing
    opinions expressed in the two matters now pending before the FCC.

    LightSail 2 Set to Launch on June 22

    The Planetary Society's citizen-funded LightSail 2 solar-propelled
    spacecraft is set to launch on June 22 on board a SpaceX Falcon
    Heavy. It will attempt the first controlled solar sail flight in
    Earth orbit. LightSail 1 successfully completed its test flight
    mission in 2015. LightSail^(R) is aimed at testing "solar sailing"
    technology for CubeSats, which comprise many Amateur Radio
    satellites. According to the Planetary Society, solar sailing uses
    reflective sails to harness the momentum of sunlight for propulsion.
    "One disadvantage to CubeSats is that they typically lack propulsion,
    which limits their range of applications," The Planetary Society
    says. "LightSail will demonstrate the viability of using solar
    sailing for CubeSats."

    Scientific collaboration between The Planetary Society and Russia led
    to the creation of Cosmos 1, a solar sail spacecraft launched aboard
    a repurposed ICBM. But test flights in 2001 and 2005 failed due to
    problems with the launch vehicle. The first successful solar sail was
    launched by Japan in 2010, when the IKAROS spacecraft was deployed
    from a Venus-bound space probe. NASA has looked into using solar
    sails to de-orbit CubeSats with atmospheric drag, and its Nanosail-D2
    mission in 2010 was successful. The Planetary Society's LightSail
    program was initiated a year earlier. It aimed to construct a CubeSat
    similar to Nanosail-D that would demonstrate true solar sailing.
    LightSail 1 snagged a slot aboard an Atlas V launch in 2015, but the
    target orbit was not high enough for solar sailing thrust to overcome
    atmospheric drag. The Planetary Society accepted the free ride anyway
    and successfully tested the spacecraft's sail deployment mechanism.

    LightSail 2 will be enclosed within Prox-1, a Georgia Tech
    student-built spacecraft the size of a small washing machine. Prox-1
    will detach from the Falcon Heavy into a circular 720-kilometer
    orbit. A week later, it will deploy LightSail 2.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    The Doctor opens the Listener Mailbag in the new (June 20) episode of
    the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet,
    or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to
    doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone
    or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can
    also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration
    required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free
    Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never
    listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.

    ARRL, IARU Contingents to Attend HAM RADIO 2019 in Germany

    Delegations from ARRL and the International Amateur Radio Union
    (IARU) will attend HAM RADIO 2019, the popular international Amateur
    Radio exhibition in Friedrichshafen, Germany. Each year, a contingent
    from ARRL attends HAM RADIO, greeting its non-US members and
    networking with other national radio societies. Billed as Europe's
    biggest Amateur Radio convention, HAM RADIO 2019 takes place June 21
    - 23 on the shores of Lake Constance.

    ARRL representatives will include ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR;
    International Affairs Vice President Jay Bellows, K0QB, and ARRL
    staff members CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX; Product Development Manager
    Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, and Regulatory Information Manager Dan
    Henderson, N1ND.

    Attending on behalf of the IARU are President Tim Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA;
    Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ, and past IARU Secretary and ARRL
    President (1995 - 2000) Rod Stafford, W6ROD.

    This year's event marks the 44th HAM RADIO exhibition and the 70th
    Lake Constance Convention of Radio Amateurs, sponsored by Germany's
    IARU member-society, the Deutscher Amateur Radio Club (DARC). The
    convention theme this year is "Amateur Radio on Tour."

    DARC Press Spokesperson Stephanie Heine, DO7PR, points out, "Radio
    amateurs know no bounds and are on land and water as well as in the
    air with their mobile 'ham radio shacks.' They like having the option
    of being reachable all over the world on their expeditions and
    getting to know new friends."

    Some 180 exhibitors and associations from 32 countries are expected
    to attend. In 2018, the event drew 15,460 visitors from 63 countries.
    Radio Amateur to Lose License as Part of Enforcement Case Settlement

    New Jersey radio amateur David S. Larsen, Sr., WS2L, of Highland
    Park, will surrender his Amateur Extra-class license and pay a $7,500
    civil penalty as part of a Consent Decree with the FCC to settle an
    enforcement action. An FCC Enforcement Bureau Order released June 18
    said Larsen violated the Communications Act of 1934 and Part 90 rules
    by operating on frequencies licensed to the Borough of Highland Park
    for public safety communication.

    As part of the settlement, Larsen admitted to making the unauthorized
    transmissions, and he agreed not to engage in unauthorized use of a
    radio station, and to surrender radios in his possession capable of
    transmitting on the town's public safety frequencies. If the
    Commission finds that Larsen makes unauthorized radio transmissions
    or otherwise violates the terms of the Consent Decree, he'll be
    subject to an additional $32,500 civil penalty. The agreement
    stipulates that Larsen may not apply for a new Amateur Radio license
    for 3 years.

    The case stems from a May 2018 complaint of unauthorized
    transmissions on the Highland Park municipal radio system. FCC agents
    followed up with several visits to the town.

    "Based on information provided by the complainant and direct
    observations by the Bureau's agents, the unauthorized transmissions
    consisted of brief, pre-recorded sounds (such as the sad trombone
    sound)," the FCC said in the Consent Decree. The FCC said individuals
    the agents interviewed identified Larsen -- a former rescue squad
    volunteer -- as the person who was likely responsible.

    Responding to an FCC Letter of Inquiry, Larsen subsequently contacted
    the Enforcement Bureau and related that the unauthorized
    transmissions had ceased. Last fall, Larsen, responded to the inquiry
    through counsel to deny making the unauthorized transmissions. A
    short time later, the unauthorized transmissions resumed, and the FCC
    restarted its investigation, attempting to trace the source of the
    transmissions. Last March, agents used direction-finding equipment at
    a fixed location near the complainant's residence, while other agents
    conducted mobile direction finding of Larsen's vehicle in transit.

    "The four agents observed Mr. Larsen pull over to the side of the
    road on the way to his home," the Consent Decree recounts. "The four
    Bureau agents observed (a) that during the brief stop, Mr. Larsen
    remained in his vehicle, (b) while stopped, a brief transmission
    consisting of the sad trombone sound emanated from the direction of
    Mr. Larsen's vehicle on a frequency licensed for use by the Highland
    Park Radio System, and (c) following the transmission of the sad
    trombone sound, Mr. Larsen resumed his drive to his residence."

    The FCC said agents returned in April to observe Larsen repeat the
    earlier behavior, including a similar transmission emanating from Mr.
    Larsen's vehicle, according to the Decree.

    Pennsylvania Radio Amateur Dies in Tower Installation Mishap

    Well-known northeastern Pennsylvania radio amateur Leland L. "Lee"
    Parsons III, N3LPJ, lost his life on June 14 during a ham tower
    installation project when a tower section he was working on collapsed
    off State Route 2069 in Gibson Township. Authorities said Parsons,
    62, was apparently attempting to attach a guy wire to the bottom
    tower section when it went over. An ARRL member, Parsons was the
    president of the Susquehanna County Amateur Radio Club.

    [WNEP TV16 video]

    The online Wireless Estimator called the incident "a stark reminder
    of the dangers present this weekend during Field Day." The article
    cited a 2009 Field Day tower collapse that claimed the life of
    57-year-old Larry Prelog, KE4PM -- an experienced climber -- while he
    was installing an antenna. In that incident, two legs at the base of
    the tower buckled.

    The Wireless Estimator article also recalled the death of the
    Reverend Paul Bittner, W0AIH, 84, a well-known radio amateur,
    contester, and Field Day participant, who lost his life last October
    when he fell from one of the towers at his extensive antenna farm in
    Wisconsin.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: The quiet sun continues, with yet
    another week of zero sunspots. As of mid-week, that makes 32 days
    with no sunspot activity. So far this year, 62% of the days have been
    spotless, much the same as last year's 61%. The average daily solar
    flux over the past week was 67.1, down from 69 a week ago, and 69.5 2
    weeks ago.

    Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 67 on June 20 - 27; 69
    on June 28 - July 4; 68 on July 5 - 6; 69 on July 7 - 9; 68 on July
    10 - 11; 67 and 66 on July 12 - 13; 67 on July 14 - 20; 68 on July 21
    - 24; 69 on July 25 - 31; 68 on August 1 - 2, and 69 on August 3.

    Predicted planetary A index is 12, 10, 8, 5, 8, 12, and 8 on June 20
    - 26; 5 on June 27 - July 5; 8 on July 6; 5 on July 7 - 9; 8 on July
    10 - 11; 5 and 8 on July 12 - 13; 12 on July 14 - 17; 10, 8, 5, 8,
    12, and 8 on July 18 - 23; 5 on July 24 - August 1, then 8 and 5 on
    August 2 - 3.

    Sunspot numbers for June 13 through 19, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    and 0, with a mean of 0. The 10.7 centimeter flux was 67.5, 68, 66.7,
    65.9, 66.3, 67, and 68, with a mean of 69. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 10, 8, 4, 4, 3, 4, and 4, with a mean of 5.9. Middle
    latitude A index was 12, 13, 6, 6, 5, 3, and 4, with a mean of 6.3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * June 22 - 23 -- ARRL Field Day (CW, phone, digital)
    * June 22 - 23 -- Ukrainian DX DIGI Contest
    * June 22 - 23 -- His Majesty King of Spain Contest, SSB
    * June 24 - 25 -- QCX Challenge (CW)
    * June 26 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * June 27 -- 3.5 RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, SSB

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Historic 2-Meter Transatlantic Contact Reported

    D41CV on Cape Verde Islands and FG8OJ in Guadeloupe spanned the
    Atlantic Ocean on 2 meters for the first time on June 16, according
    to reports. The distance was 3,867 kilometers (2,397.5 miles). The
    historic contact was made on 144.174 MHz using FT8 mode.

    "The mode of propagation was most likely marine ducting, with the
    signal traveling in a layer near the ocean surface," said John
    Desmond, EI7GL, who was among those posting information on the
    contact. Mark De Munck, EA8FF, was at the helm of D41CV, the
    Monteverde Contest Team club station, off the coast of Africa. He
    used the beacon antenna at the station, as the so-called "Pinocchio
    Yagi" was down for repair. Bert Demarcq, FG8OJ, was on the other end
    of the contact.

    "Now that this historic contact has been made, more 144 MHz contacts
    across this part of the Atlantic are sure to follow," Desmond said.

    The initial contact does not qualify for the Brendan Trophies and
    Brendan Shields awards, because they require a valid contact to be
    made between Europe and the Americas on 2 meters. The distance
    covered, however, was greater than the distance between Ireland and
    Newfoundland.

    "We continue to write a part of the history and to push barriers
    further away," a post on the D4C VHF & Up Facebook page said.
    ARRL ARDF Coordinator Steps Down, New Coordinator Named

    ARRL Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) Coordinator Joe Moell,
    K0OV, is stepping down after more than 20 years on the job. Since he
    became ARRL ARDF Coordinator in February 1998, Moell said the sport
    of on-foot transmitter hunting under international rules has grown
    steadily in participation and popularity. Since 2001, beginners and
    experts alike have gathered each year for the USA Championships of
    ARDF.

    ARRL ARDF Coordinator
    Joe Moell, K0OV.

    ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, has appointed Jerry Boyd, WB8WFK,
    of Albuquerque, New Mexico, as the new ARRL ARDF Coordinator,
    effective on July 1. Boyd has been involved in ARDF for many years
    and has been a frequent medal winner at USA's championships. He
    headed the team of organizers for the 2002, 2005, and 2011 USA and
    IARU Region 2 ARDF Championships, held in his hometown. He was on
    Team USA for the 2004, 2006, and 2010 ARDF World Championships. Boyd
    also holds an appointment as ARRL Official Observer Coordinator for
    the New Mexico Section.

    The ARRL ARDF Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the selection
    of Team USA members for the World ARDF Championships

    Incoming ARRL ARDF
    Coordinator Jerry
    Boyd, WB8WFK.

    in even-numbered years, selecting the location and organizers of the
    annual USA ARDF Championships, and working with coordinators and
    working groups of other nations and IARU regions to schedule
    activities and develop rule updates, among other activities.

    As Boyd prepares to take the reins, President Roderick has expressed
    gratitude for all Moell has done for the advancement of ARDF. Moell
    will continue posting radio-orienteering event news and photos on his
    Homing In website and participating with other southern California
    ARDF enthusiasts. He expressed his appreciation for the efforts of
    all who have worked to make ARDF practices and competitions available
    to aspiring champions. "ARDF has moved from a novelty into the
    mainstream of Amateur Radio," he said. "It is recognized as an ideal
    way to interest young people in our hobby and to get them started.
    Please keep up the good work." Read more.
    Morse Code is Still a Hit

    The music lyrics website Genius came up with an ingenious way of
    determining if other sites -- specifically Google -- had been lifting
    song lyrics directly from its site and reposting them without
    permission. According to the Wall Street Journal, starting in 2016,
    Genius strategically placed both straight and curly apostrophes in
    their rendering of a song's lyrics. When converted into Morse code,
    the rigged punctuation spells out the words "red handed." Genius
    claims it's uncovered more than 100 instances where Google used
    Genius's own lyrics in Google search results.

    "Over the last two years, we've shown Google irrefutable evidence
    again and again that they are displaying lyrics copied from Genius,"
    Genius's chief strategy officer Ben Gross told the Wall Street
    Journal. "We noticed that Google's lyrics matched our lyrics down to
    the character."

    The Wall Street Journal corroborated the accusations by matching the
    results of three songs randomly chosen from the list of 100
    instances. Google denied the allegations through its partnership with
    LyricFind, which provides the search engine with lyrics through a
    deal with music publishers. "We do not source lyrics from Genius,"
    LyricFind Chief Executive Darryl Ballantyne said. -- Thanks to
    Rolling Stone and other media reports
    In Brief...

    ARRL has produced a downloadable video, What is Amateur Radio?, to
    use at club meetings and public events. This could be an attractive
    addition for visitors to your ARRL Field Day site this weekend. The
    video runs just under 3 minutes. A PowerPoint version is also
    available.

    Paul Stiles, KF7SOJ, will become ARRL Montana Section Manager on
    October 1. Stiles, of Billings, was the only candidate after
    nominations for the position were re-solicited this spring, and will
    serve an 18-month term. He will take over the position following
    George Forsyth, AA7GS, of Great Falls, who decided not to run for a
    new term after serving since 2013. There are no contested seats in
    the summer SM election cycle. These incumbent Section Managers had no
    opposition and were declared re-elected to start new terms on October
    1: Jack Ciaccia, WM0G (Colorado); Jack Tiley, AD7FO (Eastern
    Washington); David Benoist, AG4ZR (Georgia); Diana Feinberg, AI6DF
    (Los Angeles); Carol Milazzo, KP4MD (Sacramento Valley); Bill
    Hillendahl, KH6GJV (San Francisco); Paul Gilbert, KE5ZW (South
    Texas); Dan Ringer, K8WV (West Virginia), and Monte Simpson, AF7PQ
    (Western Washington).

    AMSAT has announced Field Day on the Satellites. June 22 - 23 is ARRL
    Field Day weekend, and each year AMSAT promotes its own concurrent
    event, focused on operation via the amateur satellites. ARRL Field
    Day offers bonus points for making a contact via satellite. The AMSAT
    Field Day 2019 event is open to all radio amateurs, and the AMSAT
    Field Day exchange is the same as that for ARRL Field Day. To reduce
    congestion, participants are limited to one contact per FM satellite,
    including the ISS. Complete rules for AMSAT Field Day are on the
    AMSAT website.

    Ham Radio Newscast Producer Hap Holly, KC9RP, and The RAIN Report
    have retired. Holly has been producing the The RAIN Report (Radio
    Amateur Information Network) newscast every week for 30 years, and
    the farewell edition is now available. "The archives will remain
    online for those who want to download and/or broadcast them," Holly
    told ARRL. "My thought is to expand the archive from RAIN Reports
    that have never been archived." A ham since 1969, Holly was a
    prolific reporter of Dayton Hamvention^(R) news and forum accounts
    over the years, and in 2002, was named Hamvention's 2002 Amateur of
    the Year. He produced The RAIN Report from his home studio/ham shack
    in suburban Chicago.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 6 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty
    Convention, Normal, Illinois
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    .
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    Subscribe to...
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    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.



    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, June 28, 2019 06:05:03
    The ARRL Letter
    June 27, 2019

    * ARRL Field Day 2019 is a Hit, Entries Due by July 23
    * Petition for Rulemaking Asks FCC to Create a New 8-Meter Amateur
    Band
    * New Device Creates Electricity from Snowfall
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * LightSail 2 Launches, Will Transmit CW Beacon
    * HAM RADIO 2019 Reports 14,300 Attended from 50 Countries
    * Over-the-Horizon Radars Continue to Plague Amateur Bands
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Headquarters will close on July 4 and 5 for Independence Day.

    The ARRL Letter will not be published on July 4, and ARRL Audio News
    will not be produced on July 5. ARRL Headquarters will re-open on
    Monday, July 8, at 8 AM EDT. We wish everyone an enjoyable and safe
    holiday weekend.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Field Day 2019 is a Hit, Entries Due by July 23

    ARRL Field Day isn't over until participants take that final step of
    submitting their entries. By Thursday at 1800 UTC, nearly 1,400 had
    done so. The preferred method of submitting a Field Day entry is via
    the 2019 Field Day Entry Form on the ARRL website. This app,
    developed and supplied by Bruce Horn, WA7BNM, asks for the call sign
    used (as well as the GOTA station call sign, if applicable), entry
    class, number of participants, list of operators, power source and
    multiplier, claimed bonus points, contact totals by band and mode,
    and GOTA station operators and contact totals. It also allows the
    attachment of supporting information for bonuses. In addition, all
    entries require a list of stations contacted by band and mode (a dupe
    sheet). A Cabrillo file is also acceptable. Log files or summary
    sheets alone sent to ARRL do not constitute a valid Field Day entry.
    To confirm that your web entry has been received, visit the Field Day
    logs received page. If the entry indicates "Pending documents,"
    upload the missing items for maximum scoring. Entries must be
    postmarked or submitted by Tuesday, July 23, 2019. Late entries
    cannot be accepted.

    Field Day is typically a club activity, and by the time the fourth
    weekend in June had arrived, nearly 1,600 groups had registered their
    locations.

    The NB6GC crew
    operated from the deck
    of the USS Hornet.

    The South Jersey Radio Association's (SJRA) K2AA operated in the 7A
    category. "This was a great effort by the SJRA members and guest
    operators, especially at the low point in the sunspot cycle and what
    seemed like not very good conditions," Bob Beyer, KE2D, reported on
    3830scores.com. "Our digital station was the new star this year,
    contributing 232 QSOs -- a considerable improvement over other
    years."

    W3AO, the well-known call sign of the National Press Radio Club in
    Maryland, had an unofficial contact count of 10,000 in the 14 A
    category. "Propagation on 15 and especially 10 meters was somewhat
    sub par, same for 6 meters," said Frank Donovan, W3LPL. "FT8 has
    fundamentally changed the digital landscape; there was very limited
    RTTY and PSK31 activity. There was also very limited CW and SSB
    activity on 6 meters."

    Rob Collins, W8HAP, tweaks the
    antenna tuning at the Ellsworth
    (Maine) Amateur Radio Association's
    W1TU Field Day site. [Rick
    Lindquist, WW1ME, photo]

    One operator who posted to the ARRL Field Day 2019 Facebook page was
    among those pointing out that propagation was difficult; while he was
    able to hear stations on the other side of the country and in the
    Caribbean, they could not hear him. He also reported high atmospheric
    noise. Nonetheless, others reported openings on 6, 10, and 15 meters,
    where good propagation has been sparse in recent months.

    Wade Harris, KF5IF, was part of the crew at the USS Batfish WW2SUB
    Field Day in Oklahoma. "Everyone seemed to have a good time, but it
    was a less-than-wonderful Field Day event, mainly due to storms that
    caused noisy band conditions and severe lightning and high winds that
    caused everyone to disconnect and drop the antennas to stay safe," he
    said on the ARRL Field Day 2019 Facebook page. Less than a month ago,
    extreme flooding at the museum floated the World War II submarine
    downriver, after mooring lines broke.

    Donald Purnhagen, K4ILG, in Florida said his 10-year-old daughter,
    Donalyn, caught the bug operating the GOTA station at the Platinum
    Coast Amateur Radio Society Field Day site (W4MLB). "After some quick
    instructions, she was answering CQs, exchanging information, and
    logging contacts," he reported on the ARRL Field Day soapbox page.
    Her dad said Donalyn was eager to return the next day and logged a
    total of some 40 contacts. "I am pretty sure that she will be ready
    to take her Technician exam by the time our hamfest rolls around in
    October," he added.

    Michelle Gangi, AC2SQ, who was among the Community Amateur Radio Club
    (K2SRV) operators in New York, asked in jest if bonus points were
    available for having a wedding take place in the midst of a Field Day
    setup. "Apparently, the lighthouse we're set up at double booked,"
    she posted on the ARRL Field Day 2019 Facebook page. "We respectfully
    shut down our stations for the ceremony."

    Brenda Plummer, KD9GDX, narrated a video tour of the Fort Wayne Radio
    Club's Field Day operation in Indiana.
    Petition for Rulemaking Asks FCC to Create a New 8-Meter Amateur Band

    The FCC has put on public notice for comment a Petition for
    Rulemaking (RM-11843) that seeks the creation of a new 8-meter
    Amateur Radio allocation on a secondary basis. The Petition suggests
    the new band could be centered on an industrial-scientific-medical
    (ISM) segment somewhere between 40.51 and 40.70 MHz. The spectrum
    between 40 and 41 MHz is currently allocated to the Federal
    Government and, as such, within the purview of the National
    Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). ARRL member
    Michelle Bradley, KU3N, of Maryland, filed the Petition in May on
    behalf of REC Networks, which she founded and described in the
    Petition as "a leading advocate for a citizen's access to spectrum,"
    including Amateur Radio spectrum.

    "REC feels that the time is right for the Commission to open a Notice
    of Inquiry and eventually a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, and in
    cooperation with the NTIA, this new band opportunity can be realized
    to spark the next generation of 'makers' in the fields of science,
    technology, education, and math (STEM), especially women and girls,"
    Bradley told the FCC in the Petition. "The more opportunities we give
    to make things, the more opportunities we have to build a pool of
    experts in STEM, right here at home."

    The Petition said the objective of a new band would be "an effort to
    foster experimentation into the propagation characteristics of this
    band midway between the 10- and 6-meter bands." An allocation in the
    8-meter band is available to radio amateurs in Ireland, where the
    Irish Radio Transmitters Society has developed a band plan for 40 -
    41 MHz.

    "REC perceives this spectrum can be used for weak signal
    experimentation and eventually general amateur use, especially along
    transatlantic paths using CW, SSB, digital modes such as FT8 and
    digital voice," the Petition said. "As no radios are mass-produced
    for this band at this time, this opens up new opportunities for
    'makers' to construct transmitters, receivers, and antenna systems
    that can be used in this spectrum."

    REC anticipates "very low" usage of the new band, "with peak usage
    around sporadic-E episodes, operating events such as ARRL Field Day,
    and VHF contests, as well as during the peak of sunspot cycles,"
    Bradley told the Commission. "[W]e feel that the sharing of 40 MHz
    can be accomplished in a manner that serves the needs of the Amateur
    Radio Service while meeting the organizational missions of Federal
    Government agencies that utilize this spectrum."

    Interested parties may file short comments on RM-11843 via the FCC's
    Electronic Comment Filing Service (Express).

    New Device Creates Electricity from Snowfall

    UCLA reports that researchers and colleagues there have designed a
    new device that creates electricity from falling and fallen snow. The
    first-of-its-kind device is inexpensive, small, thin, and flexible
    like a sheet of plastic.

    "The device can work in remote areas, because it provides its own
    power and does not need batteries," said senior author Richard Kaner.
    "It's a very clever device -- a weather station that can tell you how
    much snow is falling, the direction the snow is falling, and the
    direction and speed of the wind."

    The researchers call it a snow-based triboelectric nanogenerator,
    which generates charge through static electricity and produces energy
    from the exchange of electrons.

    Findings about the device are published in the journal Nano Energy.

    "Static electricity occurs from the interaction of one material that
    captures electrons and another that gives up electrons," said Kaner.
    "You separate the charges and create electricity out of essentially
    nothing."

    Snow is positively charged and gives up electrons. Silicone -- a
    synthetic rubber-like material composed of silicon and oxygen atoms,
    combined with carbon, hydrogen and other elements -- is negatively
    charged. When falling snow contacts the surface of silicone, that
    produces a charge that the device captures, creating electricity.

    Hiking shoe with device attached.
    [Abdelsalam Ahmed for UCLA, photo]

    "While snow likes to give up electrons, the performance of the device
    depends on the efficiency of the other material at extracting these
    electrons," said co-author Maher El-Kady, a UCLA assistant researcher
    of chemistry and biochemistry. "After testing a large number of
    materials including aluminum foils and Teflon, we found that silicone
    produces more charge than any other material."

    About 30 percent of the Earth's surface is covered by snow each
    winter, during which time solar panels often fail to operate, El-Kady
    noted. The accumulation of snow reduces the amount of sunlight that
    reaches the solar array, limiting the panels' power output. The new
    device could be integrated into solar panels to provide a continuous
    power supply when it snows, he said.
    So Now What? Podcast

    "Available Operating Modes to Us New Hams" is the focus of the new
    (June 27) episode of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio
    newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you
    have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now
    What? offers insights from those who've been just where you are now.
    New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: A new sunspot group emerged on June
    24, but don't count on it persisting much longer. It emerged already
    far along the western limb, and it's about to rotate off the visible
    solar disc.

    The average daily sunspot number increased from 0 to 6.7 over the
    June 20 - 26 reporting week, while average daily solar flux increased
    from 67.1 to 67.4.

    The average daily planetary A index decreased from 5.3 to 5, and the
    average daily middle latitude A index decreased from 7 to 5.7.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 on June 27 - July 6; 69 on July 7 - 9; 68
    on July 10 - 11; 67 on July 12 - 27; 68 on July 28; 69 on July 29 -
    31; 68 on August 1 - 2; 69 on August 3 - 5; 68 on August 6 - 7, and
    67 on August 8 - 10.

    Predicted planetary A index is 8 on June 27; 5 on June 28 - 30; 8 on
    July 1; 5 on July 2 - 5; 8 on July 6; 5 on July 7 - 9; 8 on July 10 -
    11; 5 on July 12 - 20; 8, 12, and 10 on July 21 - 23; 5 on July 24 -
    August 1; 8 on August 2; 5 on August 3 - 5; 8 on August 6 - 7, and 5
    on August 8 - 10.

    Sunspot numbers for June 20 - 26 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 24, 12, and 11,
    with a mean of 6.7. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.7, 66.5, 66.4,
    67.2, 67.9, 67.9, and 68, with a mean of 67.4. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 7, 6, 4, 3, 5, 4, and 6, with a mean of 5. Middle
    latitude A index was 8, 8, 5, 4, 5, 5, and 5, with a mean of 5.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * June 29 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * June 29 -- Battle of Carabobo International Contest (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * June 29 -- UFT QRP Contest (CW)
    * July 1 -- RAC Canada Day Contest (CW, phone)
    * July 1 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, CW
    * July 1 - 7 -- 10-10 International Spirit of 76 QSO Party (CW,
    phone, digital)
    * July 1 - 7 -- IQRP Quarterly Marathon (CW, phone, digital)
    * July 2 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * July 4 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * July 4 -- SKCC Sprint Europe CW
    * July 6 -- FISTS Summer Slow Speed Sprint (CW)
    * July 6 -- Venezuelan Independence Day Contest (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * July 6 - 7 -- DL-DX RTTY Contest
    * July 6 - 7 -- Marconi Memorial HF Contest (CW)
    * July 6 - 7 -- Original QRP Contest (CW)
    * July 6 - 7 -- PODXS 070 Club 40-Meter Firecracker Sprint
    (Digital)
    * July 10 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, SSB

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    LightSail 2 Launches, Will Transmit CW Beacon

    The Planetary Society's LightSail 2 CubeSat, launched on June 25,
    will transmit Morse code from space on 437.025 MHz, within the
    Amateur Radio 70-centimeter band. LightSail is a citizen-funded
    project to send a small spacecraft, propelled solely by sunlight,
    into Earth's orbit. The innovative satellite is due to be deployed on
    July 2 from Prox-1, a Georgia Tech student-built spacecraft. Once
    deployed, LightSail 2 will automatically transmit a beacon packet
    every few seconds, which can be decoded into 238 lines of text
    telemetry describing the spacecraft's health and status, including
    everything from battery status to solar sail deployment motor state.

    LightSail 2 lifted off from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, carried by
    the SpaceX triple-booster Falcon Heavy rocket. The launcher also
    carried aloft two dozen US Air Force spacecraft.

    "During its ride to orbit, LightSail 2 was tucked safely inside its
    Prox-1 carrier spacecraft," The Planetary Society said post-launch.
    "The Falcon Heavy upper stage's payload stack released Prox-1 about
    an hour and 20 minutes after liftoff, at an altitude of roughly 720
    kilometers (446 miles). Prox-1 will house LightSail 2 for one week,
    allowing time for other vehicles released into the same orbit to
    drift apart so each can be identified individually."

    LightSail 2 team members will soon converge at Cal Poly San Luis
    Obispo in California, where the spacecraft's mission control is
    located. Once LightSail 2 is released from Prox-1, the team will
    spend several days checking out its systems before commanding its
    dual-sided solar panels to deploy. Following that, the spacecraft's
    solar sails will be deployed in approximately 2 weeks.

    Two US Naval Academy student-built satellites carrying Amateur Radio
    payloads were on the launch. BRICSat-2 (call sign USNAP1) will
    function as a 1.2/9.6 kB APRS digipeater on 145.825 MHz. Telemetry
    will be transmitted on 437.975 MHz. PSAT-2 also will operate on
    145.825 MHz with APRS to voice and DTMF to voice/APRS, and it will
    carry a 28.120 MHz up/435.350 MHz down PSK31 transponder. An SSTV
    camera will transmit on the same downlink. -- Thanks to The Planetary
    Society, Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, and AMSAT News Service
    HAM RADIO 2019 Reports 14,300 Attended from 50 Countries

    While thousands were enjoying ARRL Field Day over the June 21 - 23
    weekend, some 14,300 visitors from more than 50 countries arrived on
    the shores of Lake Constance in Friedrichshafen, Germany, for HAM
    RADIO 2019. Show officials said this 44th event attracted about 400
    more visitors this year. The previously reported 2018 attendance of
    15,460 included radio amateurs, invited Scouts, and attendees at the
    concurrent and co-located Maker Faire, which did not take place at
    this year's show. This year's show boasted 184 exhibitors and
    associations from 32 countries.

    A young operator at the HAM RADIO
    youth "Ham Camp" station DA0HC.
    [Messe Friedrichshafen, photo]

    ARRL fielded a contingent of representatives to HAM RADIO 2019,
    headed by President Rick Roderick, K5UR.

    "The ARRL booth was busy," reported ARRL Product Development Manager
    Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R. "Many international attendees joined ARRL or
    renewed their memberships. It was nice to meet so many radio amateurs
    from around the globe." Inderbitzen said he was struck by the large
    number of younger attendees.

    "Many of these young radio amateurs and prospective hams attended Ham
    Camp," Inderbitzen said. "A large contingent representing Youngsters
    on the Air (YOTA), an initiative of IARU Region 1, helped promote the
    2019 YOTA summer camp, August 11 - 17 in Bulgaria. During HAM RADIO,
    young hams carried the YOTA flag to each of the stands organized by
    International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) member-societies, gathering
    crowds to cheer on the young hams."

    HAM RADIO 2020 will take place June 26 - 28.

    Over-the-Horizon Radars Continue to Plague Amateur Bands

    The International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Monitoring System
    (IARUMS) reports a "new kind" of over-the-horizon (OTH) radar on 20
    meters. The intruding signal, appearing to emanate from the Far East,
    was monitored during May on 14.140 - 14.150 MHz. Another Chinese
    wideband OTH radar has been showing up on 15 meters, with a signal
    160 kHz wide. An Iranian radar has appeared on 10 meters, centered on
    28.860 MHz, and is audible in Europe during sporadic-E

    A spectrograph of the "new kind" of
    over-the-horizon radar on 20 meters.
    [Wolf Hadel, DK2OM, image]

    conditions. The signal is about 46 kHz wide. The Russian OTH radar
    "Konteyner," centered on 14.127 MHz, continues to be observed, with a
    12 kHz wide signal.

    The so-called "Foghorn" OTH radar from China, first heard in 2017,
    and other OTH radars were spotted on several 20-meter frequencies.
    The Foghorn is a burst radar that has been heard on other bands, with
    the signal often jumping. The signal is frequency modulation on pulse
    (FMOP) with 66.66 sweeps-per-second bursts.

    From the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) that emerged
    following the breakup of the Soviet Union, taxi traffic continues to
    appear on 10 meters, using FM. IARUMS said pirates in the Far East
    have been "abusing" 20 meters, transmitting on 14.000 MHz, using USB.
    IARUMS monitors also logged several fish net (driftnet) buoys between
    28.000 and 28.500 MHz, transmitting a carrier followed by a CW
    identification. Codan selective callings (selcalls) believed to be in
    Oceania have been heard between 7.108 and 7.150 MHz.
    In Brief...

    A "Grand Solar Minimum" may be approaching. A juried research paper
    in Nature, "Oscillations of the baseline of solar magnetic field and
    solar irradiance on a millennial timescale," suggests that a "grand
    solar minimum" -- similar to the legendary "Maunder Minimum" -- is
    approaching, starting as early as next year and lasting for three
    solar cycles. That would be bad news for HF enthusiasts already
    struggling with marginal conditions. As the paper's abstract
    explains, "Recently discovered long-term oscillations of the solar
    background magnetic field associated with double dynamo waves
    generated in inner and outer layers of the Sun indicate that the
    solar activity is heading in the next three decades (2019 - 2055) to
    a modern grand minimum similar to Maunder one." As propagation buff
    and contester Frank Donovan, W3LPL, observed, "It's very uncertain if
    this forecast is correct, but, as usual, the forecasts of the next
    solar cycle are all over the map. Let's hope these scientists are
    wrong."

    The January 2019 VHF Contest results showed FT8 played a major role.
    The results article has been posted, and article author James Duffey,
    KK6MC, says the digital modes -- FT8 in particular -- played a major
    role in the January contest, increasing the logs submitted
    significantly. "Despite conditions, a surprising 918 logs were
    submitted, by far the most in this century!" Duffey said in his
    contest write-up. "While the total number of QSOs reported in 2019
    did not differ significantly from 2018 (61,532 in 2019, as opposed to
    59,587 in 2018), the number of submitted logs was up. Apparently, the
    FT8 operators are more inclined to submit logs than the casual
    operator on SSB and CW." Duffey went on to point out that nearly half
    of contacts made in the 2019 event occurred on 6 meters, and 60% of
    those were made on one or more of the digital modes.

    The annual "Alexanderson Day" transmission from SAQ in Grimeton,
    Sweden, will take place on June 30. The Alexanderson alternator will
    transmit on 17.2 kHz on the following schedule: Startup/tuning at
    0830 UTC, and message transmission at 0900 UTC; startup/tuning at
    1130 UTC, and message transmission at 1200 UTC. Both events will be
    livestreamed on YouTube. SAQ has introduced an online SAQ reception
    report form for listeners to report reception of any SAQ
    transmissions. This replaces the former email route. Amateur Radio
    station SK6SAQ will be active on Alexanderson Day on or about 7.035
    MHz and 14.035 MHz on CW, and 3.755 MHz on SSB. QSL via the SM QSL
    Bureau. Two stations will be on the air most of the time. An article
    discussing Alexanderson Day, called "The Legacy of Radio at Grimeton
    Station, SAQ," appears on page 66 of the July 2019 issue of QST.

    The Yasme Foundation Board of Directors has made a supporting grant
    to Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network (AREDN). AREDN extended the
    early work of the Broadband Ham Net mesh developers by developing
    firmware and related user software for more modern and efficient
    consumer routers. Based in San Diego, California, the AREDN
    development team has produced code for the Ubiquiti 2, 3, and 5 GHz
    routers and has recently added firmware to convert lower-priced
    consumer equipment from other manufacturers for amateur mesh network
    use. Yasme's grant will go toward the purchase of test equipment to
    aid AREDN's development efforts.
    Getting It Right

    In recent editions of The ARRL Letter, the dates for the Society of
    Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention in Normal, Illinois, were
    incorrect. The event will take place August 24.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque,
    New Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, July 05, 2019 06:05:03
    The ARRL Letter
    June 27, 2019

    * ARRL Field Day 2019 is a Hit, Entries Due by July 23
    * Petition for Rulemaking Asks FCC to Create a New 8-Meter Amateur
    Band
    * New Device Creates Electricity from Snowfall
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * LightSail 2 Launches, Will Transmit CW Beacon
    * HAM RADIO 2019 Reports 14,300 Attended from 50 Countries
    * Over-the-Horizon Radars Continue to Plague Amateur Bands
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Headquarters will close on July 4 and 5 for Independence Day.

    The ARRL Letter will not be published on July 4, and ARRL Audio News
    will not be produced on July 5. ARRL Headquarters will re-open on
    Monday, July 8, at 8 AM EDT. We wish everyone an enjoyable and safe
    holiday weekend.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Field Day 2019 is a Hit, Entries Due by July 23

    ARRL Field Day isn't over until participants take that final step of
    submitting their entries. By Thursday at 1800 UTC, nearly 1,400 had
    done so. The preferred method of submitting a Field Day entry is via
    the 2019 Field Day Entry Form on the ARRL website. This app,
    developed and supplied by Bruce Horn, WA7BNM, asks for the call sign
    used (as well as the GOTA station call sign, if applicable), entry
    class, number of participants, list of operators, power source and
    multiplier, claimed bonus points, contact totals by band and mode,
    and GOTA station operators and contact totals. It also allows the
    attachment of supporting information for bonuses. In addition, all
    entries require a list of stations contacted by band and mode (a dupe
    sheet). A Cabrillo file is also acceptable. Log files or summary
    sheets alone sent to ARRL do not constitute a valid Field Day entry.
    To confirm that your web entry has been received, visit the Field Day
    logs received page. If the entry indicates "Pending documents,"
    upload the missing items for maximum scoring. Entries must be
    postmarked or submitted by Tuesday, July 23, 2019. Late entries
    cannot be accepted.

    Field Day is typically a club activity, and by the time the fourth
    weekend in June had arrived, nearly 1,600 groups had registered their
    locations.

    The NB6GC crew
    operated from the deck
    of the USS Hornet.

    The South Jersey Radio Association's (SJRA) K2AA operated in the 7A
    category. "This was a great effort by the SJRA members and guest
    operators, especially at the low point in the sunspot cycle and what
    seemed like not very good conditions," Bob Beyer, KE2D, reported on
    3830scores.com. "Our digital station was the new star this year,
    contributing 232 QSOs -- a considerable improvement over other
    years."

    W3AO, the well-known call sign of the National Press Radio Club in
    Maryland, had an unofficial contact count of 10,000 in the 14 A
    category. "Propagation on 15 and especially 10 meters was somewhat
    sub par, same for 6 meters," said Frank Donovan, W3LPL. "FT8 has
    fundamentally changed the digital landscape; there was very limited
    RTTY and PSK31 activity. There was also very limited CW and SSB
    activity on 6 meters."

    Rob Collins, W8HAP, tweaks the
    antenna tuning at the Ellsworth
    (Maine) Amateur Radio Association's
    W1TU Field Day site. [Rick
    Lindquist, WW1ME, photo]

    One operator who posted to the ARRL Field Day 2019 Facebook page was
    among those pointing out that propagation was difficult; while he was
    able to hear stations on the other side of the country and in the
    Caribbean, they could not hear him. He also reported high atmospheric
    noise. Nonetheless, others reported openings on 6, 10, and 15 meters,
    where good propagation has been sparse in recent months.

    Wade Harris, KF5IF, was part of the crew at the USS Batfish WW2SUB
    Field Day in Oklahoma. "Everyone seemed to have a good time, but it
    was a less-than-wonderful Field Day event, mainly due to storms that
    caused noisy band conditions and severe lightning and high winds that
    caused everyone to disconnect and drop the antennas to stay safe," he
    said on the ARRL Field Day 2019 Facebook page. Less than a month ago,
    extreme flooding at the museum floated the World War II submarine
    downriver, after mooring lines broke.

    Donald Purnhagen, K4ILG, in Florida said his 10-year-old daughter,
    Donalyn, caught the bug operating the GOTA station at the Platinum
    Coast Amateur Radio Society Field Day site (W4MLB). "After some quick
    instructions, she was answering CQs, exchanging information, and
    logging contacts," he reported on the ARRL Field Day soapbox page.
    Her dad said Donalyn was eager to return the next day and logged a
    total of some 40 contacts. "I am pretty sure that she will be ready
    to take her Technician exam by the time our hamfest rolls around in
    October," he added.

    Michelle Gangi, AC2SQ, who was among the Community Amateur Radio Club
    (K2SRV) operators in New York, asked in jest if bonus points were
    available for having a wedding take place in the midst of a Field Day
    setup. "Apparently, the lighthouse we're set up at double booked,"
    she posted on the ARRL Field Day 2019 Facebook page. "We respectfully
    shut down our stations for the ceremony."

    Brenda Plummer, KD9GDX, narrated a video tour of the Fort Wayne Radio
    Club's Field Day operation in Indiana.
    Petition for Rulemaking Asks FCC to Create a New 8-Meter Amateur Band

    The FCC has put on public notice for comment a Petition for
    Rulemaking (RM-11843) that seeks the creation of a new 8-meter
    Amateur Radio allocation on a secondary basis. The Petition suggests
    the new band could be centered on an industrial-scientific-medical
    (ISM) segment somewhere between 40.51 and 40.70 MHz. The spectrum
    between 40 and 41 MHz is currently allocated to the Federal
    Government and, as such, within the purview of the National
    Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). ARRL member
    Michelle Bradley, KU3N, of Maryland, filed the Petition in May on
    behalf of REC Networks, which she founded and described in the
    Petition as "a leading advocate for a citizen's access to spectrum,"
    including Amateur Radio spectrum.

    "REC feels that the time is right for the Commission to open a Notice
    of Inquiry and eventually a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, and in
    cooperation with the NTIA, this new band opportunity can be realized
    to spark the next generation of 'makers' in the fields of science,
    technology, education, and math (STEM), especially women and girls,"
    Bradley told the FCC in the Petition. "The more opportunities we give
    to make things, the more opportunities we have to build a pool of
    experts in STEM, right here at home."

    The Petition said the objective of a new band would be "an effort to
    foster experimentation into the propagation characteristics of this
    band midway between the 10- and 6-meter bands." An allocation in the
    8-meter band is available to radio amateurs in Ireland, where the
    Irish Radio Transmitters Society has developed a band plan for 40 -
    41 MHz.

    "REC perceives this spectrum can be used for weak signal
    experimentation and eventually general amateur use, especially along
    transatlantic paths using CW, SSB, digital modes such as FT8 and
    digital voice," the Petition said. "As no radios are mass-produced
    for this band at this time, this opens up new opportunities for
    'makers' to construct transmitters, receivers, and antenna systems
    that can be used in this spectrum."

    REC anticipates "very low" usage of the new band, "with peak usage
    around sporadic-E episodes, operating events such as ARRL Field Day,
    and VHF contests, as well as during the peak of sunspot cycles,"
    Bradley told the Commission. "[W]e feel that the sharing of 40 MHz
    can be accomplished in a manner that serves the needs of the Amateur
    Radio Service while meeting the organizational missions of Federal
    Government agencies that utilize this spectrum."

    Interested parties may file short comments on RM-11843 via the FCC's
    Electronic Comment Filing Service (Express).

    New Device Creates Electricity from Snowfall

    UCLA reports that researchers and colleagues there have designed a
    new device that creates electricity from falling and fallen snow. The
    first-of-its-kind device is inexpensive, small, thin, and flexible
    like a sheet of plastic.

    "The device can work in remote areas, because it provides its own
    power and does not need batteries," said senior author Richard Kaner.
    "It's a very clever device -- a weather station that can tell you how
    much snow is falling, the direction the snow is falling, and the
    direction and speed of the wind."

    The researchers call it a snow-based triboelectric nanogenerator,
    which generates charge through static electricity and produces energy
    from the exchange of electrons.

    Findings about the device are published in the journal Nano Energy.

    "Static electricity occurs from the interaction of one material that
    captures electrons and another that gives up electrons," said Kaner.
    "You separate the charges and create electricity out of essentially
    nothing."

    Snow is positively charged and gives up electrons. Silicone -- a
    synthetic rubber-like material composed of silicon and oxygen atoms,
    combined with carbon, hydrogen and other elements -- is negatively
    charged. When falling snow contacts the surface of silicone, that
    produces a charge that the device captures, creating electricity.

    Hiking shoe with device attached.
    [Abdelsalam Ahmed for UCLA, photo]

    "While snow likes to give up electrons, the performance of the device
    depends on the efficiency of the other material at extracting these
    electrons," said co-author Maher El-Kady, a UCLA assistant researcher
    of chemistry and biochemistry. "After testing a large number of
    materials including aluminum foils and Teflon, we found that silicone
    produces more charge than any other material."

    About 30 percent of the Earth's surface is covered by snow each
    winter, during which time solar panels often fail to operate, El-Kady
    noted. The accumulation of snow reduces the amount of sunlight that
    reaches the solar array, limiting the panels' power output. The new
    device could be integrated into solar panels to provide a continuous
    power supply when it snows, he said.
    So Now What? Podcast

    "Available Operating Modes to Us New Hams" is the focus of the new
    (June 27) episode of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio
    newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you
    have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now
    What? offers insights from those who've been just where you are now.
    New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: A new sunspot group emerged on June
    24, but don't count on it persisting much longer. It emerged already
    far along the western limb, and it's about to rotate off the visible
    solar disc.

    The average daily sunspot number increased from 0 to 6.7 over the
    June 20 - 26 reporting week, while average daily solar flux increased
    from 67.1 to 67.4.

    The average daily planetary A index decreased from 5.3 to 5, and the
    average daily middle latitude A index decreased from 7 to 5.7.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 on June 27 - July 6; 69 on July 7 - 9; 68
    on July 10 - 11; 67 on July 12 - 27; 68 on July 28; 69 on July 29 -
    31; 68 on August 1 - 2; 69 on August 3 - 5; 68 on August 6 - 7, and
    67 on August 8 - 10.

    Predicted planetary A index is 8 on June 27; 5 on June 28 - 30; 8 on
    July 1; 5 on July 2 - 5; 8 on July 6; 5 on July 7 - 9; 8 on July 10 -
    11; 5 on July 12 - 20; 8, 12, and 10 on July 21 - 23; 5 on July 24 -
    August 1; 8 on August 2; 5 on August 3 - 5; 8 on August 6 - 7, and 5
    on August 8 - 10.

    Sunspot numbers for June 20 - 26 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 24, 12, and 11,
    with a mean of 6.7. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.7, 66.5, 66.4,
    67.2, 67.9, 67.9, and 68, with a mean of 67.4. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 7, 6, 4, 3, 5, 4, and 6, with a mean of 5. Middle
    latitude A index was 8, 8, 5, 4, 5, 5, and 5, with a mean of 5.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * June 29 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * June 29 -- Battle of Carabobo International Contest (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * June 29 -- UFT QRP Contest (CW)
    * July 1 -- RAC Canada Day Contest (CW, phone)
    * July 1 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, CW
    * July 1 - 7 -- 10-10 International Spirit of 76 QSO Party (CW,
    phone, digital)
    * July 1 - 7 -- IQRP Quarterly Marathon (CW, phone, digital)
    * July 2 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * July 4 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * July 4 -- SKCC Sprint Europe CW
    * July 6 -- FISTS Summer Slow Speed Sprint (CW)
    * July 6 -- Venezuelan Independence Day Contest (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * July 6 - 7 -- DL-DX RTTY Contest
    * July 6 - 7 -- Marconi Memorial HF Contest (CW)
    * July 6 - 7 -- Original QRP Contest (CW)
    * July 6 - 7 -- PODXS 070 Club 40-Meter Firecracker Sprint
    (Digital)
    * July 10 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, SSB

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    LightSail 2 Launches, Will Transmit CW Beacon

    The Planetary Society's LightSail 2 CubeSat, launched on June 25,
    will transmit Morse code from space on 437.025 MHz, within the
    Amateur Radio 70-centimeter band. LightSail is a citizen-funded
    project to send a small spacecraft, propelled solely by sunlight,
    into Earth's orbit. The innovative satellite is due to be deployed on
    July 2 from Prox-1, a Georgia Tech student-built spacecraft. Once
    deployed, LightSail 2 will automatically transmit a beacon packet
    every few seconds, which can be decoded into 238 lines of text
    telemetry describing the spacecraft's health and status, including
    everything from battery status to solar sail deployment motor state.

    LightSail 2 lifted off from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, carried by
    the SpaceX triple-booster Falcon Heavy rocket. The launcher also
    carried aloft two dozen US Air Force spacecraft.

    "During its ride to orbit, LightSail 2 was tucked safely inside its
    Prox-1 carrier spacecraft," The Planetary Society said post-launch.
    "The Falcon Heavy upper stage's payload stack released Prox-1 about
    an hour and 20 minutes after liftoff, at an altitude of roughly 720
    kilometers (446 miles). Prox-1 will house LightSail 2 for one week,
    allowing time for other vehicles released into the same orbit to
    drift apart so each can be identified individually."

    LightSail 2 team members will soon converge at Cal Poly San Luis
    Obispo in California, where the spacecraft's mission control is
    located. Once LightSail 2 is released from Prox-1, the team will
    spend several days checking out its systems before commanding its
    dual-sided solar panels to deploy. Following that, the spacecraft's
    solar sails will be deployed in approximately 2 weeks.

    Two US Naval Academy student-built satellites carrying Amateur Radio
    payloads were on the launch. BRICSat-2 (call sign USNAP1) will
    function as a 1.2/9.6 kB APRS digipeater on 145.825 MHz. Telemetry
    will be transmitted on 437.975 MHz. PSAT-2 also will operate on
    145.825 MHz with APRS to voice and DTMF to voice/APRS, and it will
    carry a 28.120 MHz up/435.350 MHz down PSK31 transponder. An SSTV
    camera will transmit on the same downlink. -- Thanks to The Planetary
    Society, Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, and AMSAT News Service
    HAM RADIO 2019 Reports 14,300 Attended from 50 Countries

    While thousands were enjoying ARRL Field Day over the June 21 - 23
    weekend, some 14,300 visitors from more than 50 countries arrived on
    the shores of Lake Constance in Friedrichshafen, Germany, for HAM
    RADIO 2019. Show officials said this 44th event attracted about 400
    more visitors this year. The previously reported 2018 attendance of
    15,460 included radio amateurs, invited Scouts, and attendees at the
    concurrent and co-located Maker Faire, which did not take place at
    this year's show. This year's show boasted 184 exhibitors and
    associations from 32 countries.

    A young operator at the HAM RADIO
    youth "Ham Camp" station DA0HC.
    [Messe Friedrichshafen, photo]

    ARRL fielded a contingent of representatives to HAM RADIO 2019,
    headed by President Rick Roderick, K5UR.

    "The ARRL booth was busy," reported ARRL Product Development Manager
    Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R. "Many international attendees joined ARRL or
    renewed their memberships. It was nice to meet so many radio amateurs
    from around the globe." Inderbitzen said he was struck by the large
    number of younger attendees.

    "Many of these young radio amateurs and prospective hams attended Ham
    Camp," Inderbitzen said. "A large contingent representing Youngsters
    on the Air (YOTA), an initiative of IARU Region 1, helped promote the
    2019 YOTA summer camp, August 11 - 17 in Bulgaria. During HAM RADIO,
    young hams carried the YOTA flag to each of the stands organized by
    International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) member-societies, gathering
    crowds to cheer on the young hams."

    HAM RADIO 2020 will take place June 26 - 28.

    Over-the-Horizon Radars Continue to Plague Amateur Bands

    The International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Monitoring System
    (IARUMS) reports a "new kind" of over-the-horizon (OTH) radar on 20
    meters. The intruding signal, appearing to emanate from the Far East,
    was monitored during May on 14.140 - 14.150 MHz. Another Chinese
    wideband OTH radar has been showing up on 15 meters, with a signal
    160 kHz wide. An Iranian radar has appeared on 10 meters, centered on
    28.860 MHz, and is audible in Europe during sporadic-E

    A spectrograph of the "new kind" of
    over-the-horizon radar on 20 meters.
    [Wolf Hadel, DK2OM, image]

    conditions. The signal is about 46 kHz wide. The Russian OTH radar
    "Konteyner," centered on 14.127 MHz, continues to be observed, with a
    12 kHz wide signal.

    The so-called "Foghorn" OTH radar from China, first heard in 2017,
    and other OTH radars were spotted on several 20-meter frequencies.
    The Foghorn is a burst radar that has been heard on other bands, with
    the signal often jumping. The signal is frequency modulation on pulse
    (FMOP) with 66.66 sweeps-per-second bursts.

    From the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) that emerged
    following the breakup of the Soviet Union, taxi traffic continues to
    appear on 10 meters, using FM. IARUMS said pirates in the Far East
    have been "abusing" 20 meters, transmitting on 14.000 MHz, using USB.
    IARUMS monitors also logged several fish net (driftnet) buoys between
    28.000 and 28.500 MHz, transmitting a carrier followed by a CW
    identification. Codan selective callings (selcalls) believed to be in
    Oceania have been heard between 7.108 and 7.150 MHz.
    In Brief...

    A "Grand Solar Minimum" may be approaching. A juried research paper
    in Nature, "Oscillations of the baseline of solar magnetic field and
    solar irradiance on a millennial timescale," suggests that a "grand
    solar minimum" -- similar to the legendary "Maunder Minimum" -- is
    approaching, starting as early as next year and lasting for three
    solar cycles. That would be bad news for HF enthusiasts already
    struggling with marginal conditions. As the paper's abstract
    explains, "Recently discovered long-term oscillations of the solar
    background magnetic field associated with double dynamo waves
    generated in inner and outer layers of the Sun indicate that the
    solar activity is heading in the next three decades (2019 - 2055) to
    a modern grand minimum similar to Maunder one." As propagation buff
    and contester Frank Donovan, W3LPL, observed, "It's very uncertain if
    this forecast is correct, but, as usual, the forecasts of the next
    solar cycle are all over the map. Let's hope these scientists are
    wrong."

    The January 2019 VHF Contest results showed FT8 played a major role.
    The results article has been posted, and article author James Duffey,
    KK6MC, says the digital modes -- FT8 in particular -- played a major
    role in the January contest, increasing the logs submitted
    significantly. "Despite conditions, a surprising 918 logs were
    submitted, by far the most in this century!" Duffey said in his
    contest write-up. "While the total number of QSOs reported in 2019
    did not differ significantly from 2018 (61,532 in 2019, as opposed to
    59,587 in 2018), the number of submitted logs was up. Apparently, the
    FT8 operators are more inclined to submit logs than the casual
    operator on SSB and CW." Duffey went on to point out that nearly half
    of contacts made in the 2019 event occurred on 6 meters, and 60% of
    those were made on one or more of the digital modes.

    The annual "Alexanderson Day" transmission from SAQ in Grimeton,
    Sweden, will take place on June 30. The Alexanderson alternator will
    transmit on 17.2 kHz on the following schedule: Startup/tuning at
    0830 UTC, and message transmission at 0900 UTC; startup/tuning at
    1130 UTC, and message transmission at 1200 UTC. Both events will be
    livestreamed on YouTube. SAQ has introduced an online SAQ reception
    report form for listeners to report reception of any SAQ
    transmissions. This replaces the former email route. Amateur Radio
    station SK6SAQ will be active on Alexanderson Day on or about 7.035
    MHz and 14.035 MHz on CW, and 3.755 MHz on SSB. QSL via the SM QSL
    Bureau. Two stations will be on the air most of the time. An article
    discussing Alexanderson Day, called "The Legacy of Radio at Grimeton
    Station, SAQ," appears on page 66 of the July 2019 issue of QST.

    The Yasme Foundation Board of Directors has made a supporting grant
    to Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network (AREDN). AREDN extended the
    early work of the Broadband Ham Net mesh developers by developing
    firmware and related user software for more modern and efficient
    consumer routers. Based in San Diego, California, the AREDN
    development team has produced code for the Ubiquiti 2, 3, and 5 GHz
    routers and has recently added firmware to convert lower-priced
    consumer equipment from other manufacturers for amateur mesh network
    use. Yasme's grant will go toward the purchase of test equipment to
    aid AREDN's development efforts.
    Getting It Right

    In recent editions of The ARRL Letter, the dates for the Society of
    Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention in Normal, Illinois, were
    incorrect. The event will take place August 24.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque,
    New Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

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    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur
    Radio's most popular and informative journal, delivered to your
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    Subscribe to...
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    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.



    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, July 12, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    July 11, 2019

    * ARRL Announces "Happy 150!" Hiram Percy Maxim Birthday
    Celebration
    * Window Closes on July 15 for Volunteer Monitor Program
    Applications
    * FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 Changes Recreational Drone Flying
    Requirements
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * Shop AmazonSmile on Prime Day and Support ARRL
    * IARU President Offers Assurances Regarding French 144 - 146 MHz
    Allocation Proposal
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * W1AW, NU1AW to be Headquarters Multipliers for the IARU HF
    Championship
    * Historic Amateur Radio Contact via Moon-Orbiting Satellite
    Reported
    * ARISS-International Delegates Meet in Montreal
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL Announces "Happy 150!" Hiram Percy Maxim Birthday Celebration

    This year marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of ARRL's first
    president and cofounder Hiram Percy Maxim (HPM), W1AW, born on
    September 2, 1869. ARRL will hold an operating event to celebrate
    HPM's legacy, getting under way at 0000 UTC on August 31, and
    continuing until 2359 UTC on September 8. The event is open to all
    radio amateurs.

    The goal is straightforward: Contact as many participating stations
    as possible. W1AW and all ARRL members will append "/150" to their
    call signs during this event (DX operators who are ARRL members may
    identify as <call sign>/150, if permitted by their country of
    license.) Participating stations will exchange signal report and
    ARRL/RAC Section. DX stations will send signal report and "DX." Those
    taking part may use all Amateur Radio bands, excluding 60, 30, 17,
    and 12 meters.

    Permitted modes: CW, phone (any voice modes), and digital. Submit
    Cabrillo log or ADI files. ARRL will calculate all final scores based
    on participants' uploads to the ARRL event web app (link not yet
    active).

    The 84 available multipliers only count once. These include the 83
    ARRL/RAC Sections (RAC Sections include the Canadian Northern
    Territories, encompassing VE8, VY1, and VY0) and DX. The W1AW
    operating schedule during this period may be adjusted as necessary to
    accommodate on-air celebration operating activities. Contacts with
    W1AW/150 will earn 3 points each. Contacts with any ARRL member will
    earn 2 points each. These stations will also identify as <call
    sign>/150. Contacts with nonmembers will earn 1 point each.

    Participants can earn 150 bonus points by:
    * Contacting W1AW/150 on each band and mode.
    * Uploading entries (ARRL members only).
    * Using social media to publicize this event and/or participation
    before, during, and/or after the event.
    * Operating with 5 W PEP output or less throughout the event.
    * Making at least 20 contacts while operating portable.
    * Completing at least 150 contacts.

    Online certificates will be awarded, and are available via download
    only. Updates and results will be publicized.

    There are no power or operator categories. Participating ARRL members
    who use Logbook of The World (LoTW) are encouraged to create a
    separate LoTW certificate for uploading <call sign>/150 contacts.
    Members then should upload logs for this event using their /150
    certificates. Submissions must be via the online web app. No email or
    paper submissions will be accepted.
    Window Closes on July 15 for Volunteer Monitor Program Applications

    Monday, July 15, will be the last day that applications for the new
    Volunteer Monitor Program will be accepted. Some 250 applications
    have been submitted to fill approximately 150 Volunteer Monitor (VM)
    positions in the program, which is succeeding the Official Observer
    (OO) program. Retired FCC special counsel and former Atlantic
    Division Vice Director Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, is overseeing
    ARRL's role in the development and implementation of the program, and
    he has been interviewing all applicants. Those not selected as VMs
    will be placed in a reserve pool. Current OOs have been invited to
    apply for appointments.

    Approved by the ARRL Board of Directors at its July 2018 meeting, the
    new Volunteer Monitor Program represents a formal agreement between
    the FCC and ARRL in which volunteers trained and vetted by ARRL will
    monitor the airwaves and collect evidence that can be used to correct
    misconduct, as well as to recognize exemplary on-air operation. ARRL
    will refer incidents of flagrant violations to the FCC for action, in
    accordance with FCC guidelines, and the FCC will give priority to
    enforcement cases developed by the Volunteer Monitor Program. The FCC
    proposed the program following the closures of several FCC regional
    offices and a reduction in field staff.

    ARRL and the FCC have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that
    establishes the Volunteer Monitor Program as a replacement for the
    Official Observers.

    The first Volunteer Monitors could be in place and ready to begin
    their duties by this fall.

    FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 Changes Recreational Drone Flying
    Requirements

    The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 includes changes to recreational
    drone flying in the US. Radio amateurs have used drones to inspect
    antenna systems and terrain and to carry support lines aloft, as well
    as for other purposes. The FAA considers those who fly their drones
    for fun as recreational users. The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018
    describes how, when, and where owners may fly drones for recreational
    purposes. These broad guidelines should apply to most Amateur Radio
    users of drones.
    * [IMG]Register as a "modeler." A registrant must be at least 13
    years old and a US citizen or legal permanent resident.
    * Label your model aircraft with your registration number.
    * Fly only for recreational purposes.
    * Follow the safety guidelines of a community-based organization
    (see below).
    * Fly your drone at or below 400 feet when in uncontrolled or Class
    G airspace, and do not fly it in airspace where flight is
    prohibited.
    * Keep your drone within your line of sight or within the
    line-of-sight of a visual observer who is co-located and in
    direct communication with the operator.
    * Never fly near other aircraft, especially near airports.
    * Never fly over groups of people, public events, or stadiums full
    of people.
    * Never fly near emergencies such as any type of accident response,
    law enforcement activities, firefighting, or hurricane recovery
    efforts.
    * Never fly under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

    Recreational flyers who intentionally violate any of these safety
    requirements and/or operate in a careless and reckless manner could
    be liable for criminal and/or civil penalties. Read the Authorization
    for limited recreational operations as described in Section 44809
    (PDF). All limited recreational operations should be conducted in
    accordance with this authorization.

    For more information, read Advisory Circular 91-57B.

    The FAA is upgrading the online system, known as LAANC (the Low
    Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability), so that
    recreational operations can get automated airspace authorizations to
    fly in controlled airspace.

    The new law also will require that drone operators pass an online
    aeronautical knowledge and safety test and carry proof of test
    passage. The FAA is developing the test in consultation with
    stakeholders. Recreational flyers would have to pass the test, which
    could be administered electronically. The FAA will provide additional
    guidance and will notify when the test is available. The FAA also
    will issue guidance for how it will recognize community-based
    organizations.

    More detailed information about the FAA's plan to fully implement the
    requirements of Section 349 of the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 is
    available in the Federal Register.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    So Now What? Podcast

    "Fan Questions" will be the focus of the new (July 11) episode of the
    So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you
    have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now
    What? offers insights from those who've been just where you are now.
    New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    Shop AmazonSmile on Prime Day and Support ARRL

    Amazon Prime Day is almost here! Deals start at 3 AM ET on Monday,
    July 15, and continue through Tuesday, July 16. Prime Day is one of
    the biggest shopping days of the year.

    As you browse the great deals available exclusively to Amazon Prime
    members, we invite you to shop at AmazonSmile, choosing the ARRL as
    your charity of choice.

    With every qualifying purchase you make through AmazonSmile, Amazon
    will make a contribution to ARRL. This helps ARRL extend its reach in
    public service, advocacy, education, technology, and membership.

    Support the Amateur Radio Service and ARRL with your eligible
    purchase on Amazon Prime Day, or on any day of the year.

    For more information on Amazon Prime Day and AmazonSmile visit
    AmazonSmile and log in to your Amazon account.
    IARU President Offers Assurances Regarding French 144 - 146 MHz
    Allocation Proposal

    International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) President Tim Ellam,
    VE6SH/G4HUA, said his organization empathizes with the concerns of
    radio amateurs worldwide regarding a French proposal to allocate 144
    - 146 MHz to the Aeronautical Service on a primary basis, essentially
    sharing it with Amateur Radio. The band is currently allocated to
    Amateur Radio on a primary basis around the world. Ellam this week
    offered assurances that the IARU is on top of the matter, which is
    still a regional issue, and is already working to keep the band in
    the hands of radio amateurs. While the issue could end up on the
    agenda of World Radiocommunication Conference 2023 (WRC-23), a lot
    would have to happen first.

    "There is a lot of misinformation circulating as to what the proposal
    is seeking and how IARU is responding to it," Ellam told ARRL. "While
    the proposal is a concern, petitions and the like, while well
    intended, are going to have very limited value and, in fact, may harm
    the steps being taken in the regulatory environment."

    The French proposal, submitted last month to a pre-WRC-19 European
    Conference of Telecommunications and Postal Administrations (CEPT)
    meeting, included 144 - 146 MHz within a range of frequencies to be
    studied for future airborne, non-safety applications in the
    Aeronautical Service. Germany opposed the move, and IARU "objected
    strongly," Ellam said. "Nonetheless, the proposal was carried forward
    to the next meeting of the CEPT Conference Preparatory Group in late
    August." IARU anticipates that other countries attending the August
    meeting will oppose the inclusion of 144 - 146 MHz as a frequency
    range to be considered for the WRC-23 agenda, Ellam said.

    IARU President Tim
    Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA

    Since the June meeting, IARU Region 1 (Europe, Africa, and the Middle
    East) has asked its member-societies to contact their national
    administrations (i.e., governments) to explain the importance of the
    144 - 146 MHz primary allocation, Ellam recounted. "IARU is also
    taking other actions to make its views known to those involved in the
    proposal," he said.

    "If accepted as a WRC-23 Agenda Item, this proposal would require 4
    years of studies by administrations," Ellam stressed. "Considering
    the challenges of sharing spectrum with aeronautical systems, it
    seems inevitable that the conclusion of such studies would be that
    sharing with a widely used part of the amateur spectrum presents too
    many problems to be viable."

    Ellam encouraged individual radio amateurs who want to help to become
    members of their IARU member-society. "If anything," Ellam concluded,
    "this recent news should serve as a timely reminder that defense of
    the amateur spectrum does not just happen. Your member-societies and
    the IARU constantly work at defending the amateur allocations." Read
    more.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: As was the case in the previous
    reporting week, the current week had only 1 day, July 13, on which
    sunspots made a brief appearance; both were new spots from Cycle 25,
    according to their magnetic signatures.

    The average daily solar flux declined marginally from 67.5 to 67.1.

    Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 68 on July 11 - 18, and
    67 on July 19 - August 24.

    Predicted planetary A index is 8 on July 1; 5 on July 12-27; 8 on
    July 28; 5 on July 29 - August 4; 12, 15, and 12 on August 5 - 7; 5
    on August 8 - 23, and 8 on August 24.

    Here's an interesting article on space weather from The Conversation:
    "Solar weather has real, material effects on Earth."

    Space Weather Woman Tamitha Skov, WX6SWW, has posted a new video.

    Sunspot numbers for July 4 - 10 were 0, 0, 0, 12, 0, 0, and 0, with a
    mean of 1.7. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.8, 67.5, 66.5, 67.3,
    66.5, 66.8, and 67.6, with a mean of 67.1. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 5, 5, 3, 5, 9, 17, and 15, with a mean of 8.4. Middle
    latitude A index was 8, 6, 5, 5, 7, 16, and 13, with a mean of 8.6.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * July 13 -- FISTS Summer Unlimited Sprint (CW)
    * July 13 - 14 -- IARU HF Championship (CW, phone)
    * July 13 - 14 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * July 15 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    W1AW, NU1AW to be Headquarters Multipliers for the IARU HF
    Championship

    During the IARU HF Championship contest July 13 - 14, the ARRL HQ
    station will be W1AW/7, on the air from Nevada with Tom Taormina,
    K5RC, as control operator. IARU Secretariat Club station NU1AW will
    be on the air from KC1XX in New Hampshire and K1TTT in Massachusetts
    and counts as the IARU HQ station.

    Both single and multioperator stations may operate the entire 24-hour
    period, and stations may operate on phone, on CW, or on both modes.
    IARU member-society HQ stations send signal report and official IARU
    member-society abbreviation (e.g., ARRL).

    Members of the IARU Administrative Council and the three IARU
    regional Executive Committees send "AC," "R1," "R2," and "R3," as
    appropriate. All other stations send signal report and ITU zone.
    Historic Amateur Radio Contact via Moon-Orbiting Satellite Reported

    A contact between radio amateurs in Germany and China took place on
    July 1 via the moon-orbiting LO-94 satellite, DSLWP-B, launched in
    May 2018. The two-way exchange between Reinhard Kuehn, DK5LA, in
    Sorup, Germany, and Harbin Institute of Technology club station
    BY2HIT (operated by Wei Mingchuan, BG2BHC), in Harbin, China,
    occurred between 0551 and 0728 UTC, according to reports. The
    GMSK-to-JT4G repeater onboard DSLWP-B was used to make the contact,
    the first ever via a lunar-orbiting repeater.

    "Using the GMSK-to-JT4G repeater is not easy, in terms of the signal
    power needed for the uplink," commented radio amateur and engineer
    Daniel Estévez, EA4GPZ, whose blog includes images of the lunar
    surface downloaded via DSLWP-B. "There were plans to make a QSO
    between BY2HIT and Reinhard since many months ago, but previous
    attempts didn't work out. My congratulations to the people at both
    sides of the QSO, who have achieved it a month before DSLWP-B crashes
    against the lunar surface."

    As Estévez explained it, the GMSK-to-JT4G repeater works by sending
    commands to the satellite that embed a 13-character message, using
    the same frequency and a similar protocol to the one that commands
    the camera and other satellite functions. He said sending a message
    in this fashion takes a little longer than 1 minute.

    An open telecommand protocol allows radio amateurs to take and
    download images, and DSLWP-B transmitted images of the moon and Earth
    during this week's solar eclipse. DSLWP-B was launched as a secondary
    payload with the Quequiao relay satellite as part of the Chang'e 4
    mission to the far side of the moon.

    DSLWP stands for "Discovering the Sky at Longest Wavelengths
    Pathfinder," and was designed to test low-frequency radio astronomy
    and space-based interferometry. The repeater uplink is on 2 meters
    and the downlink is on 70 centimeters.
    ARISS-International Delegates Meet in Montreal

    Representatives of nine nations were on hand as Amateur Radio on the
    International Space Station (ARISS) held its 2019 "face-to-face"
    meeting of international delegates at the Canadian Space Agency in
    Montreal, June 26 - 28. ARISS-Canada was the host for the gathering.
    A high point of the conference came when JVC Kenwood Software Manager
    Shin Aota, JL1IBD, presented two Kenwood TM-D710GA transceivers to
    ARISS-Russia delegate Sergey Samburov, RV3DR. One of the TM-D710GA
    radios will replace aging Amateur Radio equipment currently in use on
    the International Space Station, while the other will remain on Earth
    as a spare for training cosmonauts. For more than a year, these
    radios have undergone rigorous NASA qualification testing followed by
    final software configuration and verification.

    "With today's transfer of the radios to ARISS-Russia, we are one step
    closer to an enhanced Amateur Radio system on board the ISS,
    supporting various operations such as SSTV, voice communication,
    APRS, and a variety of experiments," ARISS-International said in
    announcing the presentation. The ARISS Hardware Team met on June 25.

    JVC Kenwood's Shin Aota, JL1IBD
    (left), hands a new Kenwood
    TM-D710GA transceiver to
    ARISS-Russia's Sergey Samburov,
    RV3DR. [Greg Sarratt, W4OZK, photo]

    Other topics included ARISS' future participation in NASA's Deep
    Space Gateway (DSG) program. ARISS is the only noncommercial entity
    whose ideas are under study by the program. The ARISS plan focuses on
    Amateur Radio communication, including optical communication
    channels, as well as equipment development, team cooperation,
    education, and public outreach.

    Those attending the conference included Radio Amateurs of Canada
    (RAC) President and ARISS-Canada Delegate for RAC Glenn MacDonell,
    VE3XRA; AMSAT-NA President Joe Spier, K6WAO, and AMSAT-Italia
    President Emanuele D'Andria, I0ELE. ARRL Southeastern Division
    Director Greg Sarratt, W4OZK, attended in his role as chair of the
    ARRL Board's new ARISS Committee. Rosalie White, K1STO, represented
    ARRL as an ARISS-US delegate and handled the duties of
    ARISS-International Secretary. The other ARISS-US delegate was Dave
    Taylor, W8AAS. Read more. -- Thanks to Dave Jordan, AA4KN, ARISS
    Public Relations, and Rosalie White, K1STO
    In Brief...

    Applications for the 2020 ARRL Foundation Scholarship Program will be
    accepted between September 1 and December 31, 2019. All applicants
    must be FCC-licensed radio amateurs, and many scholarships have other
    specific requirements, such as intended area of study, residence
    within a particular ARRL Division, Section or state, and license
    class. Applicants should review the scholarships and check off the
    ones for which they are eligible. If you complete an online
    application, you must also email a PDF of academic transcripts from
    your most-recently completed school year by January 13, 2020.
    Applications not accompanied by transcripts will not be considered.
    The ARRL Foundation Scholarship Committee will review all applicants
    for eligibility and award decisions. Scholarship recipients will be
    notified in May 2020 via USPS mail and email. For more information,
    visit the ARRL Foundation Scholarship Program page.

    Starting with the August issue, QST will list the recipients of W1AW
    Code Proficiency certificates. Key manufacturer Vibroplex is now
    sponsoring the certificates, which have been redesigned. The Code
    Proficiency program has been an ARRL staple for decades. Participants
    who copy a W1AW qualifying run and submit 1 minute of legible solid
    copy and the $10 certificate fee can qualify. Send submissions to
    W1AW Qualifying Run, 225 Main St., Newington, CT USA 06111. These are
    checked directly against the official W1AW text, and those
    demonstrating solid copy will receive an initial Code Proficiency
    certificate. Endorsement stickers, which cost $7.50, are issued for
    speeds up to 40 WPM. The W1AW Code Proficiency Program is open to
    hams and non-hams alike. Those seeking to attain a Code Proficiency
    certificate can listen to W1AW daily code practice sessions, in which
    the text is taken directly from QST, as announced before each
    practice run.

    A final call has been issued to solicit technical papers for
    presentation at the ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference
    (DCC). The event is set for September 20 - 22 at the Marriott Detroit
    Metro Airport Hotel. Papers will also be published in the Conference
    Proceedings. Authors do not need to attend the conference to have
    their papers included in the Proceedings. The submission deadline is
    August 5. Submit papers via email or mail to Maty Weinberg, KB1EIB,
    ARRL, 225 Main St., Newington, CT 06111. Papers will be published
    exactly as submitted, and authors will retain all rights.

    Cathryn Mitchell, M0IBG, the academic director of the University of
    Bath Doctoral College in the UK, has received the 2019 Edward
    Appleton Medal and Prize. She was recognized for her pioneering
    research in tomography and data assimilation that revealed a
    completely new perspective on the ionosphere in response to extreme
    space weather. "Mitchell innovated a completely new Earth observation
    technique by adapting medical tomography to image the Earth's
    ionosphere, thus revealing the dynamics of the near-Earth space
    environment," an announcement on the Institute of Physics (IOP)
    website explained. "Her use of Global Positioning System satellite
    signals as a source for space weather tomography, through a new
    time-dependent mathematical inversion algorithm, has given us the
    first global-scale view of the ionosphere in response to space
    weather storms." The award's namesake, Edward Appleton, won the 1947
    Nobel Prize in Physics for his 1924 work that proved the existence of
    the ionosphere. Radio amateurs participated in listening tests during
    the early 1920s that provided data regarding how radio signals
    propagate. Read more.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque,
    New Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur
    Radio's most popular and informative journal, delivered to your
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    Subscribe to...
    * NCJ -- National Contest Journal. Published bimonthly, features
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    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
    and registered guests may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by editing
    their profile.

    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
    non-commercial or educational purposes, with attribution. All other
    purposes require written permission.



    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, July 19, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    July 18, 2019

    * No Consensus Reached for FCC on "Symbol Rate" Issues
    * HWN and National Hurricane Center's WX4NHC Activate for Tropical
    Storm Barry
    * Centenarian Radio Amateur's Efforts Helped Pave the Way to the
    Moon
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * Major WSJT-X Upgrade Boosts FT4 into "a Finished Protocol for HF
    Contesting"
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * New Summer EURAO Party to Premier FT4
    * World Wide Radio Operators Foundation Announces Global Digital DX
    Contest
    * Dayton Hamvention 2019 Attendance Approaches All-Time Peak
    * IARU Represents Amateur Radio at CEPT Meetings
    * 2018 Leonard Award for Outstanding Video Journalism Presented
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    No Consensus Reached for FCC on "Symbol Rate" Issues

    ARRL-initiated efforts for rival parties to reach consensus on issues
    raised in the so-called "Symbol Rate" proceeding have ended. In
    April, the FCC granted ARRL's request for a 90-day hold in the
    proceeding, FCC Docket WT 16-239, to provide an opportunity for ARRL
    to lead an effort to determine whether consensus could be reached on
    some or all of the issues that commenters raised in the FCC's
    proceeding. The FCC already has issued a Notice of Proposed
    Rulemaking in WT 16-239, which stemmed from ARRL's rulemaking
    petition RM-11708.

    Discussions were since widened to include issues raised in another
    Petition for Rule Making, RM-11831, filed by Ron Kolarik, K0IDT, that
    seeks, "to ensure Amateur Radio digital modes remain openly decodable
    and available for monitoring" by the FCC and by other third parties,
    including other radio amateurs. His petition also aims to limit
    Automatically Controlled Digital Stations (ACDS) to identified
    subbands on HF, to reduce interference. Last month, ARRL filed an
    interim report with the FCC summarizing its efforts to bring all
    sides to the table, and on June 28, ARRL requested an additional
    60-day pause to pursue promising talks.

    "In seeking the delay, it was the ARRL's intent to facilitate
    discussions between the opposing parties in an effort to explore the
    possibility of an agreed resolution that would better protect users
    of the Amateur Radio spectrum from interference and would permit all
    members of the Amateur Radio service to continue to contribute to the
    advancement of the radio art," ARRL Washington Counsel David Siddall,
    K3ZJ, said, summarizing the situation in a July 15 letter to the FCC.
    "The end purpose, if a binding agreement between the opposing parties
    could not be reached, was to provide the strongest possible basis for
    the ARRL to file its recommendations on a fair and equitable
    resolution of the issues."

    Siddall said that despite difficulties "partially attributable to the
    passions of the respective parties," ARRL was able to schedule
    meetings with both sides and, eventually, facilitate joint
    discussions among the respective parties.

    Siddall said in his letter, "At the beginning of our meetings there
    emerged consensus on the issues to be discussed. By the end, the
    parties had reached consensus on some of the issues, but not all.
    Despite our best efforts, some of the parties did not agree to submit
    to the Commission any of the recommendations on which there had been
    an apparent consensus, having negotiated with an 'all or nothing'
    approach."

    Despite the disappointing conclusion, Siddall expressed confidence
    that a better understanding of issues and positions of the various
    interests exists among all of the parties who participated in the
    in-person meetings and teleconferences, and that this will have an
    overall positive effect upon the outcome of the proceeding. Read
    more.
    HWN and National Hurricane Center's WX4NHC Activate for Tropical
    Storm Barry

    Responding to then-Tropical Storm Barry, the Hurricane Watch Net
    (HWN) and WX4NHC -- the Amateur Radio station at the National
    Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami -- activated on July 12. The HWN's
    primary frequency is 14.325 MHz with 7.268 MHz as a secondary
    channel, depending upon propagation. This time, the HWN fired up on
    both bands.

    Net Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, noted that the HWN would be
    available to provide back-up communication to official agencies in
    the affected area and would collect and report "significant damage
    assessment data" to FEMA officials at the National Hurricane Center.

    The HWN works in concert with WX4NHC at the NHC to help forecasters
    get a better sense of ground-level meteorological data such as wind
    speed, barometric pressure, and rainfall.

    Forecasters predicted that Barry would develop into a Category 1
    hurricane before making landfall, and the storm lived up to those
    expectations. Dangerous storm surge, heavy rainfall, and high wind
    conditions were expected across the north-central Gulf Coast.

    The major fear was that heavy rainfall could generate additional
    flooding in the region. NHC forecasters said Barry was expected to
    produce total rain accumulations of 10 to 20 inches over
    south-central and southeast Louisiana, as well as over southwest
    Mississippi, with isolated maximum amounts of 25 inches. The actual
    rainfall was somewhat less but still significant.

    WX4NHC volunteers Susie Blank, WX2L
    (left), and Alan Wolfe, WB4L
    (right), with WX4NHC Coordinator
    John McHugh, K4AG, at the Hurricane
    Barry activation. [Julio Ripoll,
    WD4R, photo]

    The HWN officially secured operations for Hurricane Barry on July 13,
    after the storm made landfall on the Louisiana coast. Graves said the
    activation for Barry "proved to be a good training platform for our
    newest members" and an opportunity to test new systems.

    WX4NHC remained active for 2 days, gathering surface reports from
    stations located in the affected areas for use by forecasters. "We
    received many reports about the flooding, downed trees, road
    closures, and power outages," said WX4NHC Assistant Coordinator Julio
    Ripoll, WD4R. He expressed gratitude for the support of the Hurricane
    Watch Net and the EchoLink VoIP Hurricane Net (WX_TALK).

    "Remember, the season is still young, so please, don't drop your
    guard," Graves advised

    Centenarian Radio Amateur's Efforts Helped Pave the Way to the Moon

    The Nashville Tennessean newspaper recently featured the story of a
    104-year-old ARRL member who contributed to NASA's effort to put the
    first humans on the moon 50 years ago this month. Cary Nettles,
    W5SRR, of Columbia, Tennessee -- who calls himself the nation's
    oldest rocket scientist still alive -- was a NASA project manager and
    research engineer on rocket propulsion systems in the 1950s and
    1960s.

    While working on the Centaur second-stage rocket program, Nettles
    determined that the rocket engine failures NASA was experiencing were
    a result of misdirected exhaust destroying the vehicles' engines.
    Nettles told the Tennessean he came up with an "exhaust pipe" that
    solved the problem. In May 1966, an Atlas-Centaur launcher propelled
    the first Surveyor lander toward the moon. That year, NASA awarded
    Nettles and colleague Ed Jonash with its Distinguished Service Medal
    for "their superhuman effort in turning the troubled rocket into a
    reliable upper stage," according to a 2004 NASA publication, "Taming
    Liquid Hydrogen -- The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket 1958 - 2002."

    On July 16, 1969, a Saturn V rocket with a liquid hydrogen-fueled
    second stage carried astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and
    Michael Collins to their rendezvous with the moon. Nettles retired
    from NASA the following year.

    Nettles got his Amateur Radio license in 1945 and remains active on
    40 meters as well as on VHF and UHF repeaters. He is a member of the
    Maury Amateur Radio Club. In addition to sustaining his interest in
    ham radio over the decades, Nettles is an enthusiast of "large-scale"
    steam trains, which he works on in his basement. Look for him
    Tuesdays at 1400 UTC on 7.215 MHz on the Steam Railroad Net.

    In 2015, the year he turned 100, the ARRL Tennessee Section presented
    Nettles with its Elder Statesman Award.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Antenna Polarization" is the topic of the new (July 18) episode of
    the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet,
    or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to
    doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone
    or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can
    also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration
    required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free
    Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never
    listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.

    Major WSJT-X Upgrade Boosts FT4 into "a Finished Protocol for HF
    Contesting"

    The WSJT Development Group has announced the "general availability"
    release of WSJT-X version 2.1.0. This major upgrade formally
    introduces FT4 as "a finished protocol for HF contesting." Users have
    been advised to discontinue using any "release candidate" (beta)
    versions of the software that WSJT-X version 2.1.0 supplants. The
    latest edition of the popular digital software suite also includes
    improvements and bug fixes in several areas, including FT8. The list
    includes:
    * FT8 waveform generated with GMSK and fully backward compatible
    * User options for waterfall and spectrum display
    * Contest logging
    * Rig control
    * User interface

    The WSJT-X Development Group is providing a separate WSJT-X version
    2.1.0 installation package for 64-bit Windows that offers significant
    improvements in decoding speed.

    A detailed list of program changes since WSJT-X version 2.0.1 is
    included in the cumulative release notes. Upgrading from earlier
    versions of WSJT-X should be seamless, with no need to uninstall a
    previous version or to move any files.

    Installation packages for Windows, Linux, and Macintosh are
    available.

    Visit the FT8/FT4/JT9: WSJT 2-Way Narrow Modes for Amateur Radio
    Facebook page for additional information. Read more.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Very low solar activity continues;
    there were no sunspots. Over the past week, average daily solar flux
    changed insignificantly, from 67.1 to 67. Average daily planetary A
    index changed from 8.4 to 5.9, while mid-latitude A index changed
    from 8.6 to 6.7. Conditions remain quiet. Predicted solar flux is 68
    for July 18 - 24, and 67 for July 25 - August 31.

    The predicted planetary A index is 5 on July 18 - 22; 8 on July 23; 5
    on July 24 - 27; 8 on July 28; 5 on July 29 - August 3; 8, 15, 15,
    and 8 on August 4 - 7; 5 on August 8 - 10; 10, 12, and 8 on August 11
    - 13; 5 on August 14 - 23; 8 on August 24; 5 on August 25 - 30, and 8
    on August 31.

    On July 17, Spaceweather.com reported a coronal hole spewing a stream
    of solar wind, with arrival expected to cause minor geomagnetic upset
    in the July 19 - 20 time frame. Spaceweather also reported that, so
    far this calendar year, 64% of all days were without sunspots. Last
    year the total percentage of spotless days was 61%, 28% in 2017, 9%
    in 2016, and nearly 0% in 2011 - 2015.

    N4SO in Alabama reported some success on July 13 running FT8 with 15
    W while testing a new antenna. He contacted stations in Texas,
    California, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Oregon, and Guatemala.

    On July 12, KD4SR reported contacting Puerto Rico, Haiti, Hawaii,
    Brazil, and Canada from central Florida on 6 meters, running FT8 and
    100 W to modest antennas.

    Sunspot numbers for July 11 - 17 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with a
    mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.1, 66.8, 66, 67.2, 67.1,
    67.2, and 67.8, with a mean of 67. Estimated planetary A indices were
    8, 5, 6, 5, 7, 4, and 6, with a mean of 5.9. Middle latitude A index
    was 9, 5, 6, 6, 8, 5, and 8, with a mean of 6.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * July 20 -- NAQCC CW Sprint
    * July 20 -- Russian Radio Team Championship (CW, phone)
    * July 20 -- Trans-Tasman Low-Bands Challenge (CW, phone, digital)
    * July 20 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * July 20 -- SA Sprint Contest (CW, phone)
    * July 20 - 21 -- North American QSO Party, RTTY
    * July 20 - 21 -- CQ Worldwide VHF Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * July 21 -- RSGB Low Power Contest (CW)
    * July 21 -- CQC Great Colorado Gold Rush (CW)
    * July 22 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * July 24 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * July 25 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (Digital)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    New Summer EURAO Party to Premier FT4

    The motto of the new European Radio Amateurs' Organization (EURAO)
    Summer Party is "Premiering FT4." This is not a contest but an
    on-the-air radio gathering with some suggested guidelines. The event
    is set for July 27 - 28 UTC.

    A new "general availability" release of WSJT-X that includes the
    latest FT4 protocol for HF contesting was released on July 15 as part
    of WSJT-X 2.1.0. FT4 is designed to be suitable for contesting in a
    manner similar to RTTY. Recommended frequencies for FT4 are 3.595,
    7.090, 10.140, 14.140, 18.104, 21.140, 24.919, 28.180, 50.318, and
    144.170 MHz.

    Exchanges are limited to what FT4 can accommodate, such as call sign,
    grid square, and signal report. For statistical purposes, EURAO is
    asking participants to submit logs in ADIF format, with your call
    sign as the file name. No results will be published, only statistical
    information.

    World Wide Radio Operators Foundation Announces Global Digital DX
    Contest

    The World Wide Radio Operators Foundation (WWROF), in collaboration
    with the Slovenia Contest Club (SCC), has announced the World Wide
    Digi DX Contest (WW Digi), which it hopes will become an annual
    event. The inaugural running of the 24-hour contest will take place
    on August 31 - September 1. The new contest aims to tap into the
    enthusiasm being generated by the new digital modes pioneered by Joe
    Taylor, K1JT, and the WSJT-X Development Group. Participants will use
    FT4 and FT8 on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters. The WW Digi will
    utilize a distance-based scoring system, with participants earning
    points based on the distance between grid square centers of the two
    stations in a given contact.

    "This will encourage operators to seek out long-distance, weak-signal
    contacts that highlight the technical advantages of the new digital
    modes," WWROF's announcement said.

    To encourage activity across all bands, each new two-character grid
    field contacted on each band will be a multiplier. The final score
    will the product of total contact points and grid field (i.e., the
    initial two letters) contacts. Single-operator and multioperator
    entries are invited to take part.

    "The contest has been designed to enable making contacts utilizing
    standard WSJT-X software behavior, making it easy for non-contesters
    to participate," the announcement said. "At the same time, the
    contest supports some new techniques that will encourage operating
    innovation, such as permitting stations to work up to three 'QSO
    streams' on a band at one time. Robotic operation is specifically
    prohibited in order to keep the human element as part of the game."

    Plaques will be awarded to top scorers. Read more.
    Dayton Hamvention 2019 Attendance Approaches All-Time Peak

    The Hamvention Executive Team announced July 15 that attendance at
    Dayton Hamvention^(R) 2019 was 32,472, the second-largest ever. This
    marks the highest attendance recorded since Hamvention moved from
    Hara Arena to the Greene County Fairgrounds and Exposition Center in
    Xenia, Ohio. This year's attendance also approached an all-time
    Hamvention high. Attendance at the show peaked in 1993, while
    Hamvention was still being held at Hara Arena, at 33,669, before the
    1996 change in date from April to May. Last year, Hamvention welcomed
    28,417 visitors in its second year in Xenia. Attendance in 2016 for
    the show's final year at Hara was 25,364. Hamvention hosted the ARRL
    2019 National Convention, and both embraced the theme of "Mentoring
    the Next Generation."

    "Our early indications were that 2019 would be a big year, and it
    lived up to our expectations," Hamvention General Chair Jack Gerbs,
    WB8SCT, said. "Our more than 700 volunteers worked hard to ensure
    that we presented a great show for our visitors. It wouldn't have
    been possible without them. I also want to thank all our vendors and
    visitors and hope they will all be back next year."

    Hamvention officials suggested that a small factor behind the
    increased attendance might have been the free admission on Sunday, an
    effort to allow local non-hams to experience Hamvention. Free Sunday
    admission is expected to be continued next year.

    The world's largest Amateur Radio exposition, Dayton Hamvention is
    sponsored by the Dayton Amateur Radio Association (DARA) every third
    full weekend in May. Hamvention 2020 will take place on May 15, 16,
    and 17. Read more.
    IARU Represents Amateur Radio at CEPT Meetings

    International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 (IARU R1) reports that a
    further meeting to address the topic of Wireless Power Transmission
    (WPT) took place earlier this month. A subgroup of the European
    Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT)
    Committee SE24, charged with work on a report on generic WPT devices,
    met in Copenhagen, Denmark in early July. IARU Region 1 President Don
    Beattie, G3BJ, provided input on projections of harmful emissions
    from WPT systems -- both generic and WPT for electric vehicles --
    operating at existing harmonic emission limits.

    IARU also reported on tests carried out on small WPT devices, and a
    full report is to be considered at the next meeting in September.
    IARU continues to argue for tighter emission limits on harmonics and
    other spurious emissions from WPT systems, which have the potential
    to cause sustained harmful interference to incumbent radio services.

    IARU also was represented at a recent meeting in Switzerland of the
    CEPT Project Team D. This was the last of the CEPT project team
    meetings preparing European Common Proposals (ECP) for a number of
    agenda items for World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19)
    this fall in Egypt.

    WRC-19 agenda item 1.1, which addresses the possibility of a
    "harmonized" Region 1 allocation at 50 MHz, was the key issue to be
    resolved. The project team agreed on the text of an ECP for WRC-19,
    which, if adopted by the delegates, would see an entry in the
    International Table of Allocations for Region 1 and allocate 50 - 52
    MHz to Amateur Radio on a secondary basis.

    In addition, the team agreed upon the addition of a footnote to the
    International Table to permit individual CEPT countries to introduce
    a national primary allocation in the 50.0 - 50.5 MHz subband.

    IARU will attend the final meeting of CEPT's Conference Preparatory
    Group (CPG) in late August and finalize CEPT's input to WRC-19. That
    meeting will consider a proposal by France to allocate 144 - 146 MHz
    to the Aeronautical Service on a primary basis.
    2018 Leonard Award for Outstanding Video Journalism Presented

    ARRL Hudson Division Director Ria Jairam, N2RJ, and Vice Director
    Bill Hudzik, W2UDT, recently presented the ARRL 2018 Leonard Award
    for Outstanding Video Journalism to NJTV public television
    correspondent Andrew Schmertz. The presentation took place in at NJTV
    in Newark, New Jersey.

    2018 Leonard Award for Outstanding
    Video Journalism recipient Andrew
    Schmertz of NJTV is flanked by
    Hudson Division Director Ria
    Jairam, N2RJ (left), and Vice
    Director Bill Hudzik, W2UDT.

    Schmertz was recognized for his story that featured interviews with
    New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) Assistant Research
    Professor Nathan Frissell, W2NAF, co-founder of HamSCI and the Solar
    Eclipse QSO Party, as well as numerous faculty members, members of
    the NJIT Amateur Radio station K2MFF, and attendees at a February
    2018 HamSCI conference at NJIT that Frissell spearheaded. The
    conference focused on the significance of measuring the effects of
    solar activity on radio communication. Through HamSCI, Frissell was
    instrumental in enlisting the global Amateur Radio community to gauge
    the effects of the August 2017 solar eclipse on propagation.

    The ARRL Board of Directors conferred the Leonard Award on Schmertz
    upon recommendation of the ARRL Public Relations Committee, which
    oversees the Leonard Awards for Outstanding Journalism in print,
    audio, and video. The award's namesake is the late CBS News President
    Bill Leonard, W2SKE.
    In Brief...

    The ARRL Board of Directors will meet July 19 - 20 in Windsor,
    Connecticut, for its second meeting of 2019. According to the agenda,
    the Board will hear reports from officers and committees as well as
    from some Headquarters staff managers. Representatives of the
    International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) and Radio Amateurs of Canada
    (RAC) are expected to attend as guests of the Board.

    Language in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Reauthorization
    Act of 2018 will exclude all but a small number of Amateur Radio
    towers from marking requirements. Thanks to action taken in 2017 and
    2018 by ARRL, the bill's original language was amended to the extent
    that amateur towers, as well as residential towers used for
    over-the-air TV reception, were effectively exempted from marking
    requirements. The topic was addressed at the annual "Ham Radio and
    the Law" forum at the Dayton Hamvention^(R) this past May. Some key
    points from that presentation: (1) Towers covered by the rules are
    structures at least 50 feet tall that support an antenna and are
    located in a rural area or on farmland or immediately adjacent to
    such land. (2) According to the Act, the term "covered tower" does
    not include any structure that is adjacent to a house, barn, or other
    building, and "is within the curtilage of a farmstead or adjacent to
    another building or visible structure." ARRL Regulatory Information
    Manager Dan Henderson, N1ND, explains that, while a few Amateur Radio
    towers will fall under the Act's marking requirements and will have
    to be registered, towers in residential yards or within farmland are
    specifically exempted. More information is on the ARRL website.

    AMSAT has issued a first call for papers for its anniversary
    symposium this fall. The 50th anniversary AMSAT Annual Meeting and
    Space Symposium will be held October 18 - 20 at The Hilton Arlington,
    950 North Stafford Street, Arlington, Virginia. Proposals for papers,
    symposium presentations, and poster presentations are invited on any
    topic of interest to the Amateur Satellite community. AMSAT request a
    working title for presentations, with final presentations submitted
    by September 23 for inclusion in the printed proceedings. Send
    abstracts and papers to Dan Schultz, N8FGV. -- Thanks to AMSAT

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention, Reno, Nevada
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 6 - 8 -- New England Division Convention, Boxborough,
    Massachusetts
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque,
    New Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, July 26, 2019 06:05:03
    The ARRL Letter
    July 25, 2019

    * ARRL Field Day 2019 Attracts Nearly 3,100 Entries
    * ARES Responds to Early July Earthquakes and Aftershocks in
    Southern California
    * Millions of AMPRNet Internet Addresses Sold to Fund Grants and
    Scholarships
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * ARRL's 2018 Annual Report is Now Available
    * Amateur Radio Being Showcased at 2019 EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh,
    Wisconsin
    * IEEE Symposium Exhibit Displays the Breadth of Amateur Radio
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Scouts Attending World Scout Jamboree Set to Talk with Space
    Station via Ham Radio
    * Some European Telecoms Regulators Keeping an Open Mind on French
    2-Meter Proposal
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL Field Day 2019 Attracts Nearly 3,100 Entries

    The 30-day deadline to submit ARRL Field Day entries via app upload
    and (timely postmarked) USPS mail is now past, and the ARRL Contest
    Branch reports 3,070 entries have been logged into the system. Last
    year saw 2,903 entries. ARRL Radiosport and Field Services Manager
    Bart Jahnke, W9JJ, said the total does not include entries postmarked
    by July 23 and still in transit. A number of entries still show a
    status of "PENDING." These include 280 incomplete entries that are
    missing the required list of call signs by band/mode (also known as a
    "Dupe Sheet"), or a Cabrillo file.

    "This requirement is to ensure that claimed contact totals do not
    include duplicate contacts on the same band and mode," Jahnke said.
    "These entries, if not complete, may end up as check logs in the
    final listings."

    An additional 191 entries are missing something other than Dupe
    Sheets. "These entries are complete," Jahnke explained. "Their scores
    at present are not benefitting from certain bonuses, for which
    documentation is still outstanding," he said. "Confirmation for
    entries submitted online using the web app include a link to update
    your entry.

    A young visitor to the Boulder
    Amateur Radio Club's W0DK Field
    Day site in Colorado makes his
    first contact on ham radio.
    This 3A operation was beset by
    rain and cool to chilly
    temperatures.

    If ARRL generated the entry from paper, or if you are unable to
    update your entry, submit pending documentation via email, and the
    Contest Branch will update your entry, assuming that
    documentation/photos confirm the bonus points claimed."

    Updates are permitted until August 23. After that, all entries as of
    that moment will be considered final. Results will appear in the
    December 2019 issue of QST. Jahnke encouraged groups to separately
    submit photos with captions for possible inclusion in QST.
    Individuals should be identified by names and call signs, and any
    subject younger than 18 years old will require a signed publication
    release. Photos should have a minimum resolution of 250 kB.
    ARES Responds to Early July Earthquakes and Aftershocks in Southern
    California

    On the morning of July 4, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake rocked the
    California High Desert, with its epicenter near Trona in the Searles
    Valley, not far from Ridgecrest, population roughly 29,000.

    ARES volunteer Jerry Brooks, KK6PA, activated the Eastern Kern County
    ARES Net, and, as members assessed their own situations and were able
    to participate, activity grew on the Eastern Kern County ARES
    Emergency Net. Others filled in as Net Control Stations a the
    activation progressed.

    The Logistics Chief with the Ridgecrest Emergency Operations Center
    (EOC), Robert Oberfeld, contacted Eastern Kern County ARES to ask
    that a radio operator be assigned to the Ridgecrest Police Department
    mobile communications van at the EOC. Eastern Kern County ARES was
    able to relay information from mobile operators to the EOC regarding
    roadway conditions in the area, as several main highways -- including
    Highway 178, the only route between Ridgecrest and Trona -- had been
    rendered impassable. CalTrans was alerted, and repair crews had the
    route opened for limited traffic within a short time.

    As the aftershocks lessened and the extent of the damage by the first
    temblor had been assessed, the EOC requested that ARES stand down but
    remain on standby.

    A US Geological Survey map displays
    the swath of earthquakes and
    aftershocks around Independence Day
    in California.

    The next day, Friday, July 5, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck in
    the early evening. This was followed over the next 2 hours nearly 2
    dozen aftershocks, ranging in magnitude from 4.5 to 5.5.

    When Eastern Kern County ARES activated again, significantly more
    damage had occurred, with the result that fewer operators were
    immediately available. More subsequently came on board to provide
    their observations to the EOC. In all, 57 operators were active at
    various times on the emergency net, providing status and updates.
    Eastern Kern County ARES stood down from active status at 9 PM on
    Sunday.

    "The ensuing days have brought thousands of aftershocks of generally
    small magnitude, but the threat of larger aftershocks remains, so
    Eastern Kern County ARES remains on stand by for now," said Dennis
    Kidder, W6DQ. Aftershocks are expected to continue for a long time,
    he said. Read more. -- Thanks to Dennis Kidder, W6DQ, Eastern Kern
    County ARES

    Millions of AMPRNet Internet Addresses Sold to Fund Grants and
    Scholarships

    The proceeds from this month's sale of some 4 million unused
    consecutive AMPRNetâ*Ť internet addresses will fund operations of the
    nonprofit Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC). This will
    establish a program of grants and scholarships in support of
    communications and networking research -- with a strong emphasis on
    Amateur Radio, an ARDC news release said. ARDC manages AMPRNet. While
    the sale fetched "several million dollars," ARDC said that its Board
    of Directors had agreed to keep the exact figure confidential for
    now, "to avoid adversely influencing others buying and selling
    addresses."

    The addresses sold came out of a block of some 16 million internet
    addresses obtained nearly 40 years ago and "devoted exclusively to
    Amateur Radio" for TCP/IP ham radio networking. Ownership of the
    addresses passed to an informal group of hams that included Phil
    Karn, KA9Q; Wally Lindstruth, WA6JPR (SK), and later, Brian Kantor,
    WB6CYT. Karn and Kantor remain on the ARDC Board.

    In its statement, ARDC said the sale decision was unanimous and that
    proceeds would be invested, in the hope that they will become "a
    perpetual endowment from which each year we will award grants and
    scholarships to qualified recipients who will use the funds to
    advance the state of the communications arts."

    ARDC said it intends to grant funds "across all reaches of the
    educational, research, and development spectrum," with awards going
    toward the support of qualified IRS 501(c)(3) organizations.

    No grants or scholarships have been granted as yet. ARDC said it is
    forming a committee to screen future candidate organizations.
    So Now What? Podcast

    "Tips on Using Coax Cable" will be the focus of the new (July 25)
    episode of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you
    have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now
    What? offers insights from those who've been just where you are now.
    New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    ARRL's 2018 Annual Report is Now Available

    ARRL has announced the release of its 2018 Annual Report to members.
    In his message to members, ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said
    "new generation" hams engage with Amateur Radio in a very different
    way than hams of his generation.

    "Through extensive research, we've learned that they come to Amateur
    Radio hoping to learn how to use it in aid of their communities, and
    for enhancing the fun they're already having while camping, hiking,
    or doing other outdoor activities," President Roderick said. "We've
    also learned that they've been discouraged by the difficulty of
    finding information and help that would allow them to get involved."
    He said ARRL has turned its attention toward those hams over the past
    year, and he directed readers to read about ARRL's new Lifelong
    Learning Department, which, he said, "will create learning materials
    for Amateur Radio enthusiasts at all levels of knowledge -- but
    especially for the beginners."

    "I'm excited about the new ways in which the organization is
    preparing to fulfill its mission to advance the art, science, and
    enjoyment of Amateur Radio," President Roderick concluded. "I hope
    you are, too."

    In his message, Chief Executive Officer Howard Michel, WB2ITX, said
    ARRL is at a crossroads, "and we need to look seriously at what we
    are and what we do. For ARRL to remain relevant to Amateur Radio, it
    must evolve. That evolution, while swift, can't be haphazard."

    "We are about relationships and information. We are about creating,
    curating, and disseminating information about Amateur Radio," Michel
    said.

    Members may download and read ARRL's 2018 Annual Report on the ARRL
    website. Set Adobe Reader to its two-page viewing mode to better view
    the larger layout. Read more.
    Amateur Radio Being Showcased at 2019 EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh,
    Wisconsin

    ARRL member-volunteers are part of the excitement at the 2019
    International Experimental Aircraft Association annual AirVenture
    show, which wraps up on July 29 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. This year
    marks the 50th anniversary of EAA AirVenture, which drew more than
    600,000 visitors and 10,000 aircraft last year. The ARRL exhibit
    highlights radio communications, encouraging pilots and aviation
    enthusiasts to discover the many facets of Amateur Radio and to
    expand their interest in technology. ARRL Product Development Manager
    Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, organized the booth (#2152 in Hangar B) and
    all-volunteer team.

    "This is a great opportunity to show off Amateur Radio at such a
    large-scale event," Inderbitzen said. "There's a kinship among the
    aviation and Amateur Radio communities. In addition to introducing
    newcomers to ham radio, we met over 600 ham-pilots at last year's
    AirVenture." (See "Growing Amateur Radio, One Pilot at a Time,"
    January 2019, QST, pp. 77 - 80.)

    Icom America and EAA Warbirds of America have organized special event
    station W9W, which will be on the air all week from AirVenture.
    [IMG]Look for W9W on 40 through 10 meters and on VHF and UHF. The
    station will be set up against the backdrop of the display of
    historic and vintage ex-military aircraft.

    Members of the Fox Cities Amateur Radio Club (FCARC) are operating
    W9ZL from the nearby Pioneer Airport. The station is located within
    KidVenture, which is filled with activities for children and youth
    attending AirVenture. (See the ARRL Special Events database for
    further details about W9ZL and W9W.)

    Tying in with the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, EAA
    AirVenture will host Apollo 11 crew member Michael Collins on Friday,
    July 26, as the event's featured guest.

    IEEE Symposium Exhibit Displays the Breadth of Amateur Radio

    Amateur Radio received excellent exposure during the IEEE
    International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation July 7 - 12 in
    Atlanta, Georgia. Some 1,400 delegates from 23 countries attended,
    and many visited ARRL's exhibit to learn more about Amateur Radio.
    Three active Amateur Radio stations were available via remote
    internet connections.

    "I wanted the booth to be inviting and get people's attention," said
    Wes Lamboley, W3WL, of the North Fulton Amateur Radio League, who
    headed up the team of booth volunteers. "The main objective was to
    engage people and find out what their interests were and then make
    them aware of aspects of ham radio that may be of interest." That
    included Amateur Radio in space activities, including the Amateur
    Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program and ham
    radio satellites.

    Visitors to the ARRL exhibit
    included (left to right) Ray Bailey,
    N4GYN; Jim Kaufman, W4IU -- a recent
    QST author; Eric Eveleigh, KN4VRW;
    ARRL Georgia Section Manger David
    Benoist, AG4ZR, and Chuck Catledge,
    AE4CW.

    Lamboley estimated that up to 400 attendees visited the ARRL exhibit,
    and all received an "Ask Me About Amateur Radio" pin designed by Ward
    Silver, N0AX.

    "As this Symposium was about antennas, propagation and radio science,
    the most interest on the part of non-hams seemed to be the frequency
    allocations we have," Lamboley observed. "It seemed that over 50% of
    the attendees were working in the 10 to 100 GHz range and engaged in
    many experimental/research endeavors in that range. This is being
    driven by 5G. There was much interest in Arduinos as well."

    Several attendees sat for Amateur Radio examinations offered at the
    conference.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: On Monday, July 22, a new sunspot
    appeared, but just for 1 day, and the magnetic signature showed it to
    be from the current Solar Cycle 24.

    Average daily solar flux increased insignificantly, from 67 to 67.3.
    Predicted solar flux is 67 for July 25 through September 7.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on July 25; 8 on July 26 - 27; 5 on
    July 28 - August 3; 8, 15, 15, and 8 on August 4 - 7; 5 on August 8 -
    18; 8 on August 19 - 20; 5 on August 21; 8 on August 22 - 24; 5 on
    August 25 - 30; 8, 15, 15, and 8 on August 31 - September 3, and 5 on
    September 4 - 7.

    An article in EurekAlert, "'Terminators' on the Sun trigger plasma
    tsunamis and the start of new solar cycles," discusses the end of the
    current cycle and beginning of the new one.

    A European Space Agency (ESA) article discusses the Solar Wind
    Composition Experiment during the Apollo 11 mission.

    Sunspot numbers for July 18 - 24 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 11, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 1.6. The 10.7 centimeter flux was 67, 66.7, 67, 67.7, 67.3,
    67.4, and 67.8, with a mean of 67.3. Estimated planetary A indices
    were 3, 4, 3, 8, 8, 6, and 5, with a mean of 5.3. Middle latitude A
    index was 4, 3, 5, 9, 11, 7, and 5, with a mean of 6.3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * July 27 - 28 -- RSGB IOTA Contest (CW, phone)
    * July 28 -- ARS Flight of the Bumblebees (CW)
    * July 29 - 30 -- QCX Challenge (CW)
    * August 1 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 1 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Scouts Attending World Scout Jamboree Set to Talk with Space Station
    via Ham Radio

    Thousands of Scouts from some 160 countries attending the 24th World
    Scout Jamboree this summer in West Virginia will have the chance to
    witness an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
    contact. The World Scout Jamboree opened on Monday, July 22. If all
    goes according to schedule, a group of 10 Scouts at Jamboree, chosen
    from among those who signed up for the opportunity, will gather at
    the World Scout Jamboree's NA1WJ to pose questions to astronaut Drew
    Morgan, KI5AAA, at the helm of OR4ISS on the ISS. The contact is set
    to take place on Saturday, July 27, at 1827 UTC. Morgan is an
    assistant scoutmaster. The contact will be enabled via a "telebridge"
    between NA1SS and ON4ISS at AMSAT-Belgium. The event will be streamed
    live via Facebook.

    In its proposal for the ARISS contact, Jamboree officials said they
    wanted the ARISS contact to serve as "the pinnacle experience during
    the World Jamboree," demonstrating to the more than 50,000 Scouts
    attending that "technology is a fascinating vocation as well as
    avocation and is a suitable area of pursuit within their Scouting
    program as well as at home when selecting an educational path for
    their lives and careers."

    The Jamboree offers demonstrations of Amateur Radio on HF, VHF, UHF,
    and multiple satellite contacts. The Jamboree also will offer Amateur
    Radio direction finding (ARDF) -- hidden-transmitter hunts
    (foxhunting) -- on 80 meters and 2 meters. More than 3,000 Scouts are
    expected to take part in the Amateur Radio demonstrations over the 11
    days of the Jamboree, Scout officials said.
    Some European Telecoms Regulators Keeping an Open Mind on French
    2-Meter Proposal

    At least two European telecommunications regulators appear inclined
    to give serious consideration to a French proposal to allocate 146 -
    148 MHz to the Aeronautical Mobile Service on a primary basis. Some
    International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 1 member-societies
    have written their governments' regulators, expressing opposition to
    the proposal, aired at a June CEPT meeting. The matter remains a
    regional issue at this stage but could become an agenda item for
    World Radiocommunication Conference 2023 (WRC-23).

    In response to a letter from Switzerland's IARU member-society USKA
    to telecommunications regulator BAKOM, the agency's head of frequency
    planning assured USKA that this was not a matter of depriving radio
    amateurs of primary use, but said "so-called co-primary" usage of 144
    - 146 MHz by both services could be examined.

    "We don't see how the Amateur Radio Service...and the Aeronautical
    Service could co-exist without operating restrictions," USKA said in
    a report that asks, "Is the 2 Meter Band Threatened?" The article's
    author, Bernard Wehrli, HB9ALH, advised radio amateurs to keep using
    2 meters and to avoid taking on the issue individually.

    Meanwhile the Netherlands IARU member-society VERON reports what it
    called a "disappointing response" from national regulator Agentschap
    Telecom to a call from Dutch radio amateurs that 144 - 146 MHz be
    protected. According to VERON, an initial Agentschap Telecom response
    indicated that the French proposal "fits in with Dutch frequency
    policy" that encourages joint and shared use of spectrum. VERON said
    Agentschap Telecom has indicated that it's necessary to take a good
    look at actual use of the segment and to have insight into
    compatibility.

    "VERON shares the opinion that this proposal has no viability," the
    organization asserts, pointing to remarks from IARU President Tim
    Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA, that said the proposal to share 144 - 146 MHz
    would require 4 years of studies and reach the same conclusion.

    Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) President Dave Wilson, M0OBW,
    also wrote to the UK's telecoms regulator Ofcom, strongly expressing
    the RSGB's concerns. Wilson said RSGB "views the French proposal as
    lacking a proper understanding of the implications of sharing an
    aeronautical application with weak-signal terrestrial and space
    communications services."

    Ellam told ARRL this week that, at this point, he's not concerned
    that some telecommunications regulators are giving serious
    consideration to the French proposal. "I think this is just part of
    the ongoing discussions," he said. Read more.
    In Brief...

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has accepted the
    European Radio Amateurs' Organization (EURAO) as a sector member.
    EURAO joins the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) in
    representing the Amateur Service at ITU conferences. IARU President
    Tim Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA, said his organization welcomes EURAO to ITU
    membership and hopes to work closely with its representatives in ITU
    Study Groups and Working Parties to protect Amateur and
    Amateur-Satellite spectrum. "IARU believes that a strong degree of
    cooperation between our two organizations into the future will be in
    the best interests of the Amateur Service and is committed to working
    to make that happen," Ellam said. IARU has participated in ITU
    conferences since 1927 and has been an ITU sector member since 1932,
    playing an active role in the work of the ITU Radiocommunication and
    Development sectors.

    Online registration is now available for Microwave Update 2019.
    Sponsored by the North Texas Microwave Society, the event will take
    place October 3 - 5 at the Hilton Garden Inn and Conference Center in
    Lewisville (Dallas), Texas. Microwave Update is the year's premier
    microwave conference and an ideal place to meet fellow microwave
    enthusiasts to share ideas and techniques. Tom McDermott, N5EG, will
    lead a Thursday, October 3, workshop on GNU Radio. Friday, October 4,
    will feature antenna-gain measuring and phase noise analysis. The
    Saturday banquet speaker will be Rex Moncur, VK7MO, who activated
    more than 100 grid squares on 10 GHz Earth-Moon-Earth in both
    Australia and New Zealand. Kent Britain, WA5VJB, will coordinate the
    publishing of the proceedings by the ARRL, and additional papers are
    invited. Submit articles by September 3.

    ARRL's Logbook of The World has been updated to embrace FT4 contacts
    for the Digital Worked All States award. This follows the WSJT-X
    Development Group's July "general availability" release of WSJT-X
    2.1.0. No other endorsements are under consideration at this time.
    LoTW users are currently able to upload all FT4 contacts they have
    made. While the FT4 Digital WAS Award Endorsement functions are now
    active, award processing and fulfilment remain pending the
    availability of the new endorsement sticker. Watch ARRL News for this
    and other updates.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 6 - 8 -- New England Division Convention, Boxborough,
    Massachusetts
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque,
    New Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, August 02, 2019 06:05:17
    The ARRL Letter
    August 1, 2019

    * Free Hiram Percy Maxim 150th Birthday Event Logging Software Now
    Available
    * One Dead, One Injured in New Hampshire Ham Radio Tower Mishap
    * DXpedition Team Donates Part of QSL Fees to Galapagos Conservancy
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * ARISS Next-Generation Radio System Completes Critical Flight
    Certification Tests
    * Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX, is 2019 Newsline Young Ham of the Year
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * AMSAT President Asks Members to Help Keep Amateur Radio in Space
    * IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society Seeks Student
    CubeSat RF Hardware Proposals
    * Cass Award Winners Announced
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Free Hiram Percy Maxim 150th Birthday Event Logging Software Now
    Available

    Scott Davis, N3FJP, perhaps best known for the ARRL Field Day
    software that bears his call sign, has developed a free logging
    program for ARRL's Happy 150! Hiram Percy Maxim Birthday Celebration
    on-the-air event that gets under way on August 31 and runs for 9
    days. Davis calls his software Hiram Percy Maxim Contest Log 1.0.
    Maxim, 1AW, who cofounded ARRL, was born on September 2, 1869.

    "I've never created a program for a non-recurring event before,
    because the coding time required is too large," Davis said in a post
    to the N3FJP software user group. "I've made this exception because
    this is a really nice, simple rule set with the very popular field
    day-style exchange that has the added bonus in schedule flexibility
    of running for 9 days. The Hiram Percy Maxim celebration sure looks
    like a well-designed event that will be a lot of fun for us all."

    The Happy 150! event will begin at 0000 UTC on August 31 and continue
    until 2359 UTC on September 8. It is open to all radio amateurs. The
    goal is straightforward: Contact as many participating stations as
    possible. W1AW and all ARRL members will append "/150" to their call
    signs during this event (DX operators who are ARRL members may
    operate as <call sign>/150, if permitted by their country of
    license.) Participating stations will exchange a signal report and
    ARRL/RAC Section. DX stations will send a signal report and "DX." All
    Amateur Radio bands except 60, 30, 17, and 12 meters are available.
    Permitted modes are CW, any voice mode, and digital.

    Davis said Hiram Percy Maxim Contest Log 1.0 is full featured and
    "very easy and intuitive to use."

    "If the Hiram Percy Maxim celebration is received as strongly as it
    appears, my hope is that ARRL will decide to make this an annual
    event," Davis allowed. "After all, birthdays come once a year, and we
    now have the infrastructure to continue."
    One Dead, One Injured in New Hampshire Ham Radio Tower Mishap

    A tower dismantling turned tragic on Saturday, July 27, in Deerfield,
    New Hampshire, when two radio amateurs working some 40 feet up on the
    tower were carried to the ground when the structure collapsed. Joseph
    Areyzaga, K1JGA, 52, of Goffstown, New Hampshire, did not survive
    injuries sustained in the fall, while the tower's owner, Michael
    Rancourt, K1EEE, 65, was seriously injured and remains

    Joseph Areyzaga, K1JGA.

    hospitalized. Rancourt was taking down the tower in preparation for
    selling his house, and the pair had nearly completed their work. They
    were tied into the tower and went down with it as it collapsed.

    The tower, a tilt-over model said to be 40 to 50 feet, had been
    bolted to prevent it from tilting as it was being dismantled.

    A law enforcement source said a number of people were at the site for
    a social gathering as the tower was being taken down, and they
    witnessed the tragedy.

    No official determination has been made regarding the cause of the
    structural failure, but a radio amateur who visited the scene
    afterward observed that two of the tower's three legs were clearly
    compromised and split cleanly and the third leg bent, just above the
    fully intact tilt base.

    The New Hampshire Amateur Radio tower-related fatality is the second
    such deadly incident in a little more than 6 weeks. In mid-June, a
    Pennsylvania radio amateur died when the tower he was installing
    collapsed as he was attempting to attach a guy line to the
    structure's bottom section.

    DXpedition Team Donates Part of QSL Fees to Galapagos Conservancy

    From February 28 until March 6, the HD8M Amateur Radio team operated
    from the side of Cerro Crocker, a volcano high above the city of
    Bellavista on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos. The HD8M team
    consisted of Jim Millner, WB2REM, a retired psychologist, and Bill
    Mims, W2WCM, a retired airline pilot. The purpose of the operation
    was to bring attention to the fragile ecosystem of the Galapagos
    Islands through their Amateur Radio activity. As a part of the
    confirmation process, the team exchanged QSL cards from which a
    dollar or more would be donated to Galapagos Conservancy.

    Bill Mims, W2WCM (left), and Jim
    Millner, WB2REM, at HD8M. [Photo
    courtesy of Jim Millner, WB2REM]

    "We used ClubLog's Online QSL Request System (OQRS), bureau requests
    associated with ClubLog, and SASEs for QSLing," Millner explained.
    "When stations used OQRS and requested a direct QSL Card, they were
    charged a $4 fee. We mentioned in the OQRS system that of every $4
    received, were going to donate $1 to the Galapagos Conservancy. As it
    turned out, however, we donated all extra money to the Conservancy."

    At the time, the HD8M team was the only Amateur Radio operation in
    the Galapagos Islands, making it a rare entity, so they found
    themselves in high demand. In just 6 days of operation, they
    contacted more than 8,000 stations in 140 DXCC entities as well as in
    all 50 US states.

    Millner and Mims operated two stations equipped with Icom IC-7300s
    and band-pass filters, operating on SSB, CW, and FT8, and using all
    wire antennas. HD8M took part in the ARRL International DX Phone and,
    despite poor conditions on the equator, they were able to make more
    than 600 contacts. "FT8 was a particularly a good mode despite the
    conditions," Millner said, noting that the location at 1,500 feet
    elevation on the side of a volcano gave the pair "an amazing view" of
    the ocean and outlying islands. "The wildlife was abundant with many
    colorful birds and land iguanas, as well as huge Galapagos tortoises
    that roamed around the 10-acre property.

    In addition, they added a fundraising component to their outreach and
    on their website, where donations were made directly to Galapagos
    Conservancy. As a result of HD8M's unique approach to fundraising,
    they were able to donate $2,285 to the Galapagos Conservancy in
    April. In September 2017, the HD8M team operated from Isabela Island,
    and amassed $1,200 in donations to the Conservancy. -- This is an
    expanded version of a story that appeared in Galapagos News
    spring/summer 2019 issue and appears by permission.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Noise Blankers and Noise Reduction" is the topic of the new (August
    1) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet,
    or smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to
    doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone
    or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can
    also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration
    required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free
    Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never
    listened to a podcast before, download our beginner's guide.

    ARISS Next-Generation Radio System Completes Critical Flight
    Certification Tests

    The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
    next-generation Interoperable Radio System (IORS) successfully
    completed a battery of stress tests, required as part of the final
    certification of the hardware for launch to and operation on the
    International Space Station (ISS). The IORS consists of a JVC Kenwood
    D710GA transceiver and the AMSAT-developed Multi-Voltage Power Supply
    (MVPS). In early July, the equipment successfully completed a series
    of electromagnetic interference/electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)
    tests to ensure that the ARISS hardware will not interfere with ISS
    systems or other payloads.

    The IORS also successfully passed power quality and acoustics
    testing, which verified that the ARISS IORS will not introduce
    harmful signals back into the ISS power system and is quiet enough to
    meet ISS acoustic requirements. ARISS Hardware Team members Lou
    McFadin, W5DID, and Kerry Banke, N6IZW, were at NASA's Johnson Space
    Center to support the 2-week battery of tests in concert with the
    NASA test and certification team.

    The ARISS MVPS, which is part
    of the ARISS Interoperable
    Radio System.

    "Since the IORS is being qualified to operate on 120 V dc, 28 V dc,
    and Russian 28 V dc, as well as transmit on VHF or UHF, a lot of test
    combinations were required to cover all cases," Banke said. "Each
    input voltage type was also tested at low, medium, and high line
    voltage. Moreover, additional permutations were required to test the
    IORS under no load, medium load, and full load at each voltage level.
    So it should not be surprising why the tests took 2 weeks to
    complete."

    Successful completion of these tests represents a key milestone in
    preparing the IORS for launch. ARISS says it now can begin final
    assembly of the flight units and prepare for their safety
    certification before launch. ARISS is working toward launch-ready
    status by year's end.
    Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX, is 2019 Newsline Young Ham of the Year

    Fifteen-year-old ARRL member Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX, of Normal,
    Illinois, has been selected as the 2019 Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
    Memorial Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year (YHOTY). His
    parents are Hari Rebba, VU2SPZ, and Shailaja Panyam. A rising
    sophomore at the Normal Community High School, Dhruv is a member of
    the Central Illinois Radio Club. He has been licensed since 2013,
    after a visit to Dayton Hamvention^(R) with his dad sparked his
    interest in Amateur Radio.

    Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX, operates PJ2Y
    from Curacao Island during the 2018
    Dave Kalter Youth DX Adventure.
    [Photo courtesy of KC9ZJX]

    After getting his license, Dhruv became involved in ARRL Field Day
    and public service events with the Central Illinois Radio Club,
    including the We Care Twin Cities Half Marathon and the Hop on for
    Hope Bike Ride/Walk. Dhruv says he found a way to combine his
    interest in space and engineering with his new hobby, joining AMSAT
    and pursuing his dream of a school contact with an astronaut aboard
    the International Space Station.

    In October 2017, he served as lead control operator for an Amateur
    Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) contact with
    students at his school, Chiddix Junior High, who spoke to astronaut
    Joe Acaba, KE5DAR. On July 27 of this year, Dhruv helped to
    facilitate another ARISS contact with Scouts attending the World
    Scout Jamboree in West Virginia.

    ARISS presentations at Dayton and Huntsville, Dhruv's selection as an
    ARISS mentor, and networking with those putting together the ARISS
    contact for the World Scout Jamboree led to his involvement in the
    July 27 contact.

    In 2018, Dhruv was selected to take part in the Dave Kalter Memorial
    Youth DX Adventure. He traveled to Curacao last summer, where the
    PJ2Y team logged a record 6,262 contacts with 135 entities. His
    favorite mode is SSB.

    Dhruv has earned many accolades for his Amateur Radio pursuits,
    including the Young Ham Lends a Hand Award at the 2019 Dayton
    Hamvention Youth Forum; a Presidential Award from AMSAT, and the
    Radio Club of America Young Achiever Award. He also has traveled to
    India to promote Amateur Radio awareness.

    The Young Ham of the Year was established in 1986 by Amateur Radio
    Newsline cofounder Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF (SK), in 1986. Dhruv will
    receive the 2019 YHOTY award during the Huntsville Hamfest on August
    17. Read more. -- Thanks to Amateur Radio Newsline

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: No sunspots were observed over the
    past week, and solar flux remains flat, with average daily values
    declining from 67.3 to 67. The average daily planetary A index edged
    down slightly, from 5.3 to 5, and the middle latitude A index dipped
    from 6.3 to 5.9. Predicted solar flux for the August 1 - September 14
    is 67 -- every day.

    Predicted planetary A index is10, 8, 5, and 5 on August 1 - 4; 8, 16,
    12, and 8 on August 5 - 8; 5 on August 9 - 16; 8 on August 17 - 18; 5
    on August 19 - 26; 8, 16, 8, 5, 8, 22, and 16 on August 27 -
    September 2; 5 on September 3 - 12, and 8 on September 13 - 14.

    George, N2CG, in Saddle Brook, New Jersey, wrote to report that on
    July 28, 6 meters opened to northern Europe -- mainly Finland -- with
    very good FT8 signals for more than an hour. "This was my very first
    time working Finland on 6 meters, and shortly after my QSO with
    OH3SR, he verified our QSO on LoTW!" he wrote.

    Sunspot numbers for July 25 - 31, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0,
    with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 68.2, 67.6, 66.7,
    67.1, 66.1, 66.2, and 66.9, with a mean of 67. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 8, and 8 with a mean of 5. Middle
    latitude A index was 3, 4, 4, 7, 5, 8, and 10, with a mean of 5.9.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * August 3 - 4 -- 10-10 International Summer Contest, SSB
    * August 3 -- European HF Championship (CW, phone)
    * August 3 -- WAB 144 MHz Low Power Phone
    * August 3 - 4 -- North American QSO Party, CW
    * August 3 - 4 --ARRL 222 MHz and Up Distance Contest
    * August 4 -- SARL HF Phone Contest
    * August 4 - 6 -- G3ZQS Memorial Straight Key Contest
    * August 6 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    AMSAT President Asks Members to Help Keep Amateur Radio in Space

    "It takes considerable volunteer effort and real dollars to keep
    Amateur Radio in Spac," AMSAT President Joe Spier, K6WAO, has
    reminded the organization's members in a message that included an
    invitation to the organization's 50th anniversary Space Symposium and
    Annual Meeting in October. In addition, Spier put out a call for
    "important assistance" in the areas of User Services and Engineering
    (prospective volunteers may contact Spier via email).

    "AMSAT has several fundraising needs," Spier said, noting that
    contributions to AMSAT are tax deductible to the extent permitted by
    IRS rules. "The daily operation of AMSAT is accomplished by donations
    to the General Fund. The other main department needs are the fund for
    GOLF 3U CubeSats design/construction and Amateur Radio on the
    International Space Station (ARISS)."

    AMSAT-NA President Joe
    Spier, K6WAO.

    Spier pointed to the 2018 successes of AO-92 (Fox-1D) and the launch
    of AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff). "AMSAT partnered with Spaceflight Inc. by
    contracting and paying for these launches," Spier noted. "Fundraising
    for Fox-series satellites has not yet recouped this expenditure, so
    donations are still being accepted." AMSAT expects to launch of
    RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E), in partnership with Vanderbilt University, by
    the end of summer. AMSAT is also partnering with several universities
    to fly the same linear transponder on their CubeSats.

    AMSAT has been selected for two CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI)
    opportunities for GOLF-TEE and GOLF-1. "GOLF's 3U spaceframe is being
    designed with versatility to add mission-specific radios, power
    supplies, and experiments," Spier noted. "A series of GOLF CubeSats
    will provide better coverage, and a greater footprint will allow more
    coverage by fewer satellites."

    One-time or recurring donations to AMSAT and ARISS are welcome. Read
    more.
    IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society Seeks Student CubeSat RF
    Hardware Proposals

    The IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (MTT-S) has
    announced the MTT-Sat Challenge for groups of students developing RF
    hardware for CubeSat applications. The MTT-Sat Challenge is a
    worldwide competition for teams of undergraduate and graduate
    students to design and build RF hardware for small satellites. The
    most promising designs will undergo space environmental qualification
    testing and could be incorporated into an actual CubeSat.

    "The main goal of the MTT-Sat Challenge is to advance space RF and
    microwave education, inspire students to pursue science and
    engineering education and careers, and prepare tomorrow's leaders
    with the interdisciplinary teamwork skills, which are necessary for
    success," the society said in announcing the competition. The MTT-Sat
    Challenge is intended to run over 4 academic years (starting in June
    2019) and is divided into several phases spanning overall technology
    readiness levels. Proposals may be submitted for every phase.

    At this time, the IEEE MTT-Sat Challenge is calling for ideas that
    could come from among the following fields: Transceivers based on
    commercial of the shelf (COTS) components; antenna systems and arrays
    for CubeSats; ground terminals for low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites;
    radiation-hardened electronics based on COTS components;
    inter-satellite communication; electromagnetic sensors for CubeSats,
    and novel RF technologies for space applications.

    Detailed information is available on the MTT-Sat Challenge. The
    submission deadline is October 2, 2019, 0900 UTC (October 1, 11 PM
    HST). Those planning to submit proposals should send a brief letter
    of interest by August 31.
    Cass Award Winners Announced

    Janusz Wegryzn, SP9FIH,
    receives the
    Single-Operator Cass
    Award plaque from his
    sister, Elzbieta.

    Janusz Wegrzyn, SP9FIH, has been named the winner of the 2018
    Single-Operator Cass Award for the second year in a row. While active
    from Sint Eustatius Island as PJ5/SP9FIH in March 2018, Wegryzn
    contacted 8,257 unique stations during the 14 days of his one-person
    DXpedition.

    The 3C0W Annobon Island DXpedition team was the recipient of the
    first Unlimited Cass Award for its effort in

    Vilnis Vosekalns, YL2KF
    (left), presents the
    Unlimited Cass Award
    plaque to YL2KL, YL2GM,
    and YL1ZF during the
    Latvian Amateur Radio
    League's summer
    gathering.

    logging as many DXers as possible. During March 2018, Girts Budis,
    YL2KL; Yuris Petersons, YL2GM, and Kaspars Uztics, YL1ZF, contacted
    18,812 unique call signs on the DXpedition.

    Sponsored by Club Log, DXLab, and the Northern California DX Club,
    the annual Cass Awards encourage DXpedition operating excellence by
    recognizing DXpeditions that contact the greatest number of unique
    call signs. Running leaderboards for the 2019 Cass Single-Operator
    and Unlimited awards are available on the Club Log website.

    These awards honor the wisdom and spirit of Cass Cassidy, WA6AUD
    (SK), whose weekly stories in the West Coast DX Bulletin, published
    from 1968 to 1979, engaged a generation of DXers.
    In Brief...

    Ham radio volunteers assisted in the search for a missing teen this
    week. Many radio amateurs were among the fire and police department
    personnel, search-and-rescue teams, and citizen volunteers who took
    part in the July 29 search in Sinking Springs, Pennsylvania, for a
    13-year-old youth with autism who was missing from his home. Hams
    served as leads for volunteer search teams, and ham radio provided
    solid communication with searchers. "We started the operation [at]
    about 1300 UTC, and he was located about 1900 UTC, safe," said Ralph
    Brandt, K3HQI. "Ham radio played a significant part in this." Brandt
    and Yvonne Roberts, AC3CM, handled communications during the search.
    Brandt said that about 25 of the radio amateurs taking part had been
    students in his Technician licensing classes. "It gives a good
    feeling when it works," said Brandt, who is the Affiliated Club
    Coordinator in the ARRL Eastern Pennsylvania Section.

    The spherical Chinese CAS-7B (BP-1B) Amateur Radio satellite carrying
    an FM transponder launched on July 25 at 0500 UTC. Signals from both
    the FM transponder and the telemetry beacon have been received.
    CAS-7B (BP-1B) was developed by the Chinese Amateur Satellite Group
    (CAMSAT) in cooperation with the Beijing Institute of Technology
    (BIT), and AMSAT has designated the satellite as Bit-Progress OSCAR
    102 (BO-102). CAMSAT completed the project planning, design, build,
    and testing, and manages the satellite's on-orbit operation. BIT
    provided the satellite environmental testing, launch support, and
    financial support. Many students from BIT were involved with the
    project, learning about satellite technology and Amateur Radio.CAS-7B
    is expected to have a lifetime of about a month before reentry. The
    satellite was launched on Hyperbola-1 from Jiuquan into a 300
    kilometer, 42.7° inclination orbit. The CW telemetry beacon transmits
    on 435.715 MHz; the V/U FM transponder downlink is 435.690 MHz (16
    kHz passband), and the V/U FM transponder uplink is 145.900 MHz.
    Further information is available from Alan Kung, BA1DU, at CAMSAT.

    ARRL is seeking a Development Manager for full-time employment at
    ARRL Headquarters in Newington, Connecticut. The Development Manager
    is responsible for the development and implementation of strategic
    plans to maximize funding from donors for the organization through
    creative and effective campaign management and relationship building.
    This individual holding this position is responsible for developing
    and managing fundraising campaigns, building strong and successful
    relationships, maintaining communication with donors, and
    collaborating with and supervising staff to effectively execute
    fundraising efforts, in addition to managing individual and corporate
    gifts. To apply, or for more information, see the complete opening
    announcement on the ARRL Employment Opportunities web page.

    The FCC is seeking to hire an electronics engineer for a full-time,
    permanent position at the Commission's Enforcement Bureau, Office of
    Field Director in Columbia, Maryland. The incumbent resolves RF
    interference, educates users, enforces regulations, and investigates
    all services for violations. This individual serves as a point of
    contact for FCC licensees in matters of fixed and mobile radio
    direction-finding and interference resolution, and initiates Official
    Notices of Violation, Warnings, Notices of Apparent Liability for
    Forfeiture, and other orders to radio operators and licensees. A
    Security Clearance is required. Apply by August 26. See the job
    opening announcement for details.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * August 2 - 3 -- Austin Summerfest, Austin, Texas
    * August 3 - 4 -- Cedar Valley ARC Hamfest/Midwest STEM Techfest,
    Central City, Iowa
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 6 - 8 -- New England Division Convention, Boxborough,
    Massachusetts
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque,
    New Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, August 09, 2019 06:05:03
    The ARRL Letter
    August 8, 2019

    * Cape Cod ARES and SKYWARN Provide Support in Rare Cape Cod
    Tornado Event
    * Arizona ARES Volunteers Support Communication during Arizona
    Wildland Fire
    * ARRL Member Had Role in Promising RF Treatment Device for
    Alzheimer's
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * AMSAT and ARISS Designing Amateur Radio System for Lunar Gateway
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Global Institutions Support Amateur Radio Communication and
    Experimentation
    * Centenarian Mentor and Multiple Award Recipient "Fritz" Nitsch,
    W4NTO, SK
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right!
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Cape Cod ARES and SKYWARN Provide Support in Rare Cape Cod Tornado
    Event

    Cape Cod, Massachusetts, ARES, and SKYWARN Amateur Radio volunteers
    were promptly pressed into action as a storm system on July 23
    produced severe thunderstorms that spawned three tornadoes over the
    Cape. Hurricane-force wind also resulted in significant tree and
    utility wire damage across Cape Cod. Some pockets of wind damage also
    occurred in the northwest corner of Martha's Vineyard.

    Amateur Radio SKYWARN spotters were the first to provide critical
    ground truth information. Under the direction of Cape Cod District
    Emergency Coordinator Frank O'Laughlin, WQ1O, and Eastern
    Massachusetts SEC Rob Macedo, KD1CY, a SKYWARN net ran for several
    hours on a Barnstable VHF repeater, receiving numerous damage
    reports.

    Amateur Radio operations shifted to an ARES net supporting
    communication between a shelter at the Dennis-Yarmouth School and the
    Barnstable County Emergency Operations Center, which serves as the
    Multiagency Coordination Center (MACC).

    "Dozens of reports of trees and wires down and some structural damage
    reports were received during the SKYWARN net, and Amateur Radio
    operators supported initial damage assessment in the hardest hit
    areas and provided photos and videos that were shared via social
    media and other outlets," Macedo said. "This provided critical
    situational awareness and disaster information to the National
    Weather Service (NWS), state emergency management, and local media
    outlets, and helped to diagnose the areas for NWS meteorologists to
    survey to determine whether a tornado or straight-line wind damage
    occurred."

    ARES support for the Dennis-Yarmouth shelter as well as Amateur Radio
    operations at the Barnstable County MACC continued around the clock,
    with six radio amateurs engaged in shelter and EOC communications
    over the course of about 2 days. The severe weather knocked out power
    for some 53,000 customers on Cape Cod, and it took utilities several
    days to repair the damage and restore service.

    "Traffic that was handled focused on the logistics of taking care of
    people who stayed in the shelter until power restoration efforts were
    near completion," O'Laughlin explained.

    A NWS-Norton survey team consisting of several meteorologists
    surveyed the damage and confirmed three tornadoes on Cape Cod in
    addition to destructive straight-line winds. Since tornado records
    have been kept, starting in 1950, only three tornadoes have been
    recorded on Cape Cod up until last year. -- Thanks to Rob Macedo,
    KD1CY
    Arizona ARES Volunteers Support Communication during Arizona Wildland
    Fire

    Members of the Coconino County Amateur Radio Club (CARC) in Arizona
    activated on July 21 as winds accelerated the Museum Fire beyond 50
    acres, triggering the activation of the county's Emergency Operations
    Center (EOC). Members of the club, many of them ARES volunteers,
    staffed the EOC.

    Smoke from the Museum
    Fire is in the distance
    as CARC members complete
    a temporary radio setup
    for more effective
    communication. [Ken Held,
    KF7DUR, photo]

    "The club has a great working relationship with Coconino County,"
    said CARC's Public Information Officer Dan Shearer, N7YIQ. "CARC's
    ARES component has a dedicated position in the EOC structure and has
    assisted on many incidents over the last few years, providing
    communications to field personnel when cell and radio coverage is
    limited or nonexistent."

    Shearer said Amateur Radio equipment and antennas are stored at the
    EOC, and CARC members have been trained to set it up and have
    everything operational within an hour of activation.

    The fire, of undetermined origin, soon grew larger than 500 acres and
    became a top fire-fighting priority. A Type 1 incident management
    team took over management of the fire-fighting effort late on July
    22, and more than 12 Hotshot crews (teams highly trained in all
    aspects of fire management), fire engines, water tenders, and
    aircraft were engaged in suppressing the blaze. Residents in some
    neighborhoods were ordered to evacuate, although no homes and
    structures were lost. There were fears that the fire might overrun
    communications sites on Mount Elden, which include public service,
    private, and Amateur Radio repeaters.

    "The loss of one or both of these complexes would have been
    catastrophic," Shearer said. CARC members were prepared for the risk
    and quickly assembled spare equipment, including extra radios and
    repeaters.

    A very large air tanker
    completing its run
    dropping retardant on the
    radio complexes atop Mount
    Elden. [CB Johnson, NQ9C,
    photo]

    Air tankers dropped many loads of fire retardant around the repeater
    sites, and the exceptional work of the fire crews prevented the fire
    from running up the slopes to the complexes, Shearer said.

    A midweek change in the weather with substantial rain gave
    firefighters a chance to keep the blaze from crossing a fire line
    they constructed. ARES resources were released on July 26 and placed
    on standby as the fire risk was substantially reduced.

    Shearer said there is now a risk of flash flooding across the
    burned-over areas from the region's summer rainy period, and the City
    of Flagstaff and Coconino County are providing sandbags.

    "CARC personnel provided well over 250 hours in support of the Museum
    Fire in direct support of the joint EOC," Shearer said, adding that
    the EOC team and Arizona Governor Doug Ducey expressed their
    appreciation when the governor visited the fire operations.

    The Museum Fire grew to nearly 2,000 acres before it was brought
    under control.

    ARRL Member Had Role in Promising RF Treatment Device for Alzheimer's

    ARRL member Eric Knight, KB1EHE, played a role in the development of
    an RF-based Alzheimer's disease treatment that now shows great
    promise. A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
    following a months-long FDA clinical trial of the treatment protocol
    concluded that memory decline in most patients "appeared to have been
    reversed to cognitive levels equivalent to 12 months earlier" after 2
    months of treatment. The clinical trial concluded last December 31
    and focused on the initial efficacy of what NeuroEM Therapeutics,
    Inc. -- the company developing the device -- calls "transcranial
    electromagnetic treatment" (TEMT), using a noninvasive head-worn
    device called the MemorEMâ*Ť.

    An unidentified clinical trial
    participant wearing the MemorEM
    cap. [Photo courtesy of NeuroEM
    Therapeutics]

    "Results from the trial demonstrate that TEMT was safe in all eight
    participating patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, and
    enhanced cognitive performance in seven of them, as measured by
    standard cognition scales," said a news release from NeuroEM
    Therapeutics. Seven of the eight clinical trial patients agreed to
    take part in a 4-month extension study, based on the findings and the
    positive feedback from all participants.

    "This pioneering study suggests that TEMT may be an entirely new
    therapeutic intervention against Alzheimer's disease," said NeuroEM
    CEO Dr. Gary Arendash. "Our bioengineering technology may be
    succeeding where drug therapy against this devastating disease has
    thus far failed. TEMT appears to be affecting the Alzheimer's disease
    process through several actions directly inside neurons (brain
    cells), which is where we believe the disease process needs to be
    stopped and hopefully reversed." Arendash has explained that TEMT in
    the 900 MHz range breaks down the small protein aggregates (amyloid
    oligomers) in brain cells that are thought to initiate Alzheimer's
    development.

    Eric Knight, KB1EHE

    Knight, of Unionville, Connecticut, is the president of Remarkable
    Technolgies. He has no medical background, but several years ago, he
    learned of experiments that Arendash had carried out on mice
    specially bred to have Alzheimer's disease, in which the mice were
    exposed to low levels of RF for therapeutic purposes. The effects
    were dramatic, sometimes even reversing the disease's effects.
    Borrowing some concepts from earlier experiments with small rockets
    and avionics, Knight set about developing -- and later patenting -- a
    wearable device that could deliver requisite low levels of RF to a
    human head. NeuroEM was also developing a device, which it patented
    as well, and NeuroEM has filed multiple patents since then, Knight
    explained to ARRL. NeuroEM has an exclusive license to Knight's
    patent, and his contribution is now part of the overall mix of
    applied technology.

    "As an inventor and entrepreneur, all you can hope for is to have a
    positive impact on society, and this is about as important as it
    gets," Knight told ARRL. Read more.
    So Now What? Podcast

    "SATERN'S involvement in the hurricane season using Amateur Radio"
    will be the focus of the new (August 8) episode of the So Now What?
    podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you
    have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now
    What? offers insights from those who've been just where you are now.
    New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers
    a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    ARRL Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented
    as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and
    Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that
    newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from
    staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to
    answer questions on specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    AMSAT and ARISS Designing Amateur Radio System for Lunar Gateway

    Details are still being fleshed out, but AMSAT and ARISS are working
    on the design of an Amateur Radio system for NASA's Lunar Gateway. As
    NASA explains, the Gateway "will be a small spaceship in orbit around
    the moon that will provide access to more of the lunar surface than
    ever before with living quarters for astronauts, a lab for science
    and research, ports for visiting spacecraft, and more." For NASA, the
    Lunar Gateway is "a spaceport for human and robotic exploration to
    the moon and beyond." For radio amateurs, the Lunar Gateway will
    represent the next step in moving ham radio away from low-Earth orbit
    and into deep space. Under the current timeline, initial sections of
    the Gateway are scheduled to launch in 2022, with the Gateway in
    lunar orbit by 2026.

    "To make this happen, we are leveraging the work and expertise of the
    worldwide AMSAT organizations and the international ARISS community,"
    ARISS-International Chair and AMSAT Vice President for Human
    Spaceflight Programs Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, said. "We have an
    international team working on this and are meeting twice a month to
    mature the concept." The ARISS concept was presented to NASA in May
    and got positive feedback, and was favorably received a few weeks
    later at the ARISS-International meeting in Montreal from the
    Canadian Space Agency's Gateway Program Manager.

    "The Amateur Radio Exploration (AREx) team has done some really good
    work," Bauer continued. "The challenge for amateurs will be on the
    order of a 30 dB signal path loss as compared to LEO."

    The Lunar Gateway will serve as a solar-powered communication hub,
    science lab, short-term habitation module, and a holding area for
    rovers and other robots that may be bound for the moon or for other
    planets. NASA is leading the project in collaboration with commercial
    and international partners, including all of the International Space
    Station partners.

    "We need to develop a block diagram of a system and subsystems and
    find team members who want to work on each," Bauer said when the
    ARISS-International team met in Montreal. "We must set up
    requirements and interface documentation. We need to solidify the
    frequencies to use, working with the International Space Frequency
    Coordination Group."

    ARISS ARRL Representative Rosalie White, K1STO, said that ARISS is
    working to spread the word about the new initiative. She also hopes
    the new project may inspire the generosity of the Amateur Radio
    community. Read more.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: A new sunspot group from Cycle 24
    appeared only briefly, August 7 - 8. Sunspot numbers on Monday and
    Tuesday were 11 and 12. The average daily solar flux shifted slightly
    from last week, from 67 to 67.2. The average planetary A index, an
    aggregate geomagnetic indicator, more than doubled, from 5 to 10.3,
    due to solar wind that raised the planetary A index to 35 on Monday.
    Alaska's high-latitude college A index reached 61 on Monday and 24 on
    Tuesday.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 on August 8 - 12, and 67 on August 13 -
    September 21.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on August 8 - 9; 6 and 8 on August
    10 - 11; 5 on August 12 - 16; 8 on August 17 - 18; 5 on August 19 -
    25; 8 on August 26 - 28; 5 on August 29 - 30; 12, 25, 25, 16, and 8
    on August 31 - September 4; 5, 8, and 8 on September 5 - 7; 5 on
    September 8 - 12; 8 on September 13 - 14, and 5 on September 15 - 22.

    Sunspot numbers for August 1 - 7 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 12, 11, and 0, with
    a mean of 3.3. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 66.8, 66.9, 65.7, 66.9,
    68.1, 68.1, and 68, with a mean of 67.2. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 8, 4, 3, 4, 35, 12, and 6 with a mean of 10.3. The
    middle latitude A index was 8, 4, 4, 6, 20, 10, and 6, with a mean of
    8.3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * August 10 -- QRP ARCI European Sprint (CW)
    * August 10 - 11 -- WAE DX Contest, CW
    * August 10 - 11 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * August 10 - 11 -- Maryland-DC QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 12 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * August 12 - 14 -- MMMonVHF/DUBUS 144 MHz Meteorscatter Sprint
    (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 14 -- NAQCC CW Sprint (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Global Institutions Support Amateur Radio Communication and
    Experimentation

    Former ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, has contributed to the latest
    edition of ITU News Magazine -- published by the International
    Telecommunication Union. The issue is devoted to "terrestrial
    wireless communications," which includes the Amateur Radio and
    Amateur Satellite services. Sumner's article, "Self-training,
    intercommunication and technical investigations: the amateur service
    in the 21st Century," discusses Amateur Radio within the context of a
    global network of experimenters and communicators who, in Sumner's
    words, "expand the body of human knowledge and technical skills that
    are essential to development and offer a resource that can literally
    save lives when natural disasters disrupt normal communications
    channels."

    "Amateur licensees are grateful that ITU member-states continue to
    recognize the benefits of providing direct access to the radio
    spectrum to qualified individuals," said Sumner, who now serves as
    secretary of the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), an ITU
    sector member.

    Sumner points out that access to frequency bands "spaced throughout
    the radio spectrum" is critical to Amateur Radio's future. He notes
    that the initial pattern of ham allocations dates back to 1927 and
    the International Radiotelegraph Conference. Allocations have been
    expanded at subsequent conferences, most recently at World
    Radiocomunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15), when ham radio obtained a
    tiny secondary band near 5.3 MHz. (An earlier WRC was responsible for
    the Amateur Service's two lowest-frequency allocations, 135.7 - 137.8
    kHz and 472 - 479 kHz.) The 1979 World Administrative Radio
    Conference (WARC) extended terrestrial allocations above 40 GHz to
    include amateur allocations.

    "If a future World Radiocommunication Conference extends allocations
    above 275 GHz, adequate provisions for amateur experimentation should
    be made," Sumner observed.

    The first item on the agenda for WRC-19, which takes place this fall
    in Egypt, calls on delegates to consider an allocation at 50 MHz to
    the Amateur Service in ITU Region 1 (Europe, Africa, and the Middle
    East) that aligns with existing allocations in Regions 2 and 3.

    IARU Secretary David
    Sumner, K1ZZ

    Sumner notes that ITU "plays an essential role" in keeping the
    spectrum clear of unwanted interference and emissions, an effort he
    said is "especially vital to the Amateur Service, which uses
    sensitive receivers to compensate for practical and regulatory
    limitations on antennas and transmitter power levels."

    Sumner also pointed to the role radio amateurs can play in developing
    and refining communication protocols, including digital techniques,
    to improve weak-signal performance. He noted that Joseph Taylor, K1JT
    -- a codeveloper of such digital modes as FT8, FT4, and JT65 --
    received an ITU Gold Medal in recognition of his outstanding
    contributions to radiocommunication.

    As Sumner explained, the IARU -- a federation of more than 140
    member-societies --represents the interests of radio amateurs around
    the world before ITU. IARU's contribution to the work of ITU began in
    1932 with its admission to participate in the work of the
    International Radiocommmunicaiton Consultative Committee (CCIR). IARU
    is a member of the ITU Radiocommunication and Development sectors.

    "The IARU is proud to be an active member of the ITU community,"
    Sumner said.

    Centenarian Mentor and Multiple Award Recipient "Fritz" Nitsch,
    W4NTO, SK

    ARRL Life Member and honoree Reynold L. "Fritz" Nitsch, W4NTO, of
    Spartanburg, South Carolina, died on August 5 following a brief
    illness. He turned 100 on July 21. Nitsch was the first recipient of
    the ARRL Board of Directors' Centurion Award in recognition of his
    centenarian status and of his almost half-century of continuous
    activity in the ARRL Field Organization as an Official Observer, an
    Official Emergency Station, and an Official Relay Station. Nitsch
    received the ARRL George Hart Distinguished Service Award in 2012,
    and was an earlier recipient of the Roanoke Division Service Award
    (the Vic Clark, W4KFC, Award) for his contributions to the public
    through Amateur Radio.

    A decorated World War II veteran, Nitsch served as a radio station
    engineer for about a decade after the war before going to work for
    the Federal Aviation Administration, where he remained until
    retirement.

    He was a charter member of the Spartanburg Amateur Radio Club,
    founded in 1952. Affectionately known as the "Godfather of Hams in
    Spartanburg County," Nitsch was known to have tutored and mentored
    many radio amateurs in the region. Nitsch had taught Morse code while
    in the Army and was an avid CW operator.

    Other awards and recognitions he received over the years include the
    Clara Barton Award for Meritorious Volunteer Service, recognizing his
    more than 30 years of service to the local American Red Cross chapter
    assisting in disaster responses.
    In Brief...

    An APRS Amateur Radio balloon, call sign NA1WJ-5, launched from the
    recent World Scout Jamboree, has floated across the Atlantic. The
    Scouting Magazine blog reports: "You can reach practically any corner
    of the globe via Amateur Radio. That's the message K2BSA wanted to
    show Scouts at the World Scout Jamboree. Those in the Amateur Radio
    association launched four Mylar balloons from the Summit Bechtel
    Reserve in West Virginia, in hopes that one would catch the jet
    stream and end up on the other side of the world. One did." Each
    balloon, approximately 3 feet in diameter, was equipped with GPS, a
    ham radio transmitter, and solar panels. The balloon payload could
    relay weather, movement, and location information. Each helium-filled
    balloon was capable of attaining an altitude of between 28,000 and
    32,000 feet -- nearly as high as most commercial planes fly.

    A new web tool can tell how active you have been over the past 12
    months. Plug your call sign into this website to review your station
    activity. This tool from DJ1YFK uses the Reverse Beacon Network (RBN)
    data to generate an activity report (a "heat map") showing the
    activity for any call sign. -- The ARRL Contest Update

    The 9th YOTA Summer Camp Gets Under Way on August 11.Up to 80 young
    radio amateurs, primarily from IARU Region 1 but including
    participants from other parts of the world, will gather in Bulgaria
    for the 9th annual Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) Summer Camp. Special
    call sign LZ19YOTA will be on the air during the weeklong event,
    hosted by the Bulgarian Federation of Radio Amateurs (BFRA). The
    event offers an opportunity for the participants to foster
    international friendships and goodwill and learn new Amateur Radio
    skills. The main theme will be "train the trainer" (TTT).
    Participants will be working on the future of Amateur Radio and be
    involved in workshops to gain skills to start similar ham radio youth
    events when they get back home. "We are aiming to create a snowball
    effect," the YOTA announcement said. "There will be more and more
    YOTA events all over the world. This also allows other youngsters and
    newcomers to enjoy Amateur Radio." Activities will include kit
    building and an opportunity to visit the surrounding region,
    including the ACOM amplifier factory. QSL LZ19YOTA via the bureau to
    LZ1BJ.
    Getting It Right!

    Regarding the article, "One Dead, One Injured in New Hampshire Ham
    Radio Tower Mishap," which appeared in the August 1 edition of The
    ARRL Letter, Audra Wilder, KD3K, the niece of the Michael Rancourt,
    K1EEE, the owner of the collapsed tower who was seriously injured in
    the mishap, wishes to amend some aspects of our report. According to
    Wilder, (1) Rancourt had already sold his house; (2) the tower
    involved was a 40-footer and not a tilt-over design; (3) the
    gathering at the house was a work party, with four people on the
    ground and two on the tower, and Rancourt's wife looking on; (4) when
    Wilder was visiting Rancourt's for Field Day, no visible wear on the
    tower was obvious, and (5) Rancourt had climbed the tower 24 hours
    prior to its collapse.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * August 8 - 10 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Ogden, Utah
    * August 9 - 11 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett,
    Washington
    * August 17 - 18 -- Huntsville Hamfest, Alabama State Convention,
    Huntsville, Alabama
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 6 - 8 -- New England Division Convention, Boxborough,
    Massachusetts
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque,
    New Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington
    * October 6 -- Iowa State Convention, Liberty, Iowa
    * October 11 - 12 -- PNWVHFS Conference and Meeting, Issaquah,
    Washington
    * October 11 - 12 -- Florida State Convention, Melbourne, Florida
    * October 13 -- Connecticut State Convention, Meriden, Connecticut
    * October 18 - 20 -- Pacific Division Convention, San Ramon,
    California

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur
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    Subscribe to...
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.



    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Friday, August 16, 2019 06:05:25
    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to SEAN DENNIS on Saturday, August 17, 2019 10:40:00
    --- MBSE BBS v1.0.7.12 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)


    I guess this was to be sent via on the air digital modes instead. <G>

    Daryl, WX4QZ

    ===
    ■ OLX 1.53 ■ Change is good; especially when it relates to underwear.
    --- SBBSecho 3.08-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (1:19/33)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to Daryl Stout on Sunday, August 18, 2019 09:48:00
    Hello Daryl.

    17 Aug 19 10:40, you wrote to me:

    I guess this was to be sent via on the air digital modes instead.


    No, I lost my DSL for three days because lightning hit the lines. The script runs whether or not there's an Internet connection.

    73,
    Sean KD5COL

    --- GoldED/2 3.0.1
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * bbs.outpostbbs.net:2304 (1:18/200)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to SEAN DENNIS on Monday, August 19, 2019 16:27:00
    Hello Daryl.

    Hi, Sean...

    I guess this was to be sent via on the air digital modes instead.


    No, I lost my DSL for three days because lightning hit the lines. The scrip SD>runs whether or not there's an Internet connection.

    Well, I didn't think you were using invisible ink in the message (hi
    hi).

    Daryl, WX4QZ

    ===
    ■ OLX 1.53 ■ Yesterday was the deadline for all complaints.
    --- SBBSecho 3.08-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (1:19/33)